The skinny on using commercial butter or udder nonsense?

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Postby Bill Glasheen » Wed Oct 28, 2009 2:02 am

chef wrote:
If you have a better way to get in touch...


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Works for me! :P

I can't believe you actually brought food by. You are too much.

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- Bill
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Postby chef » Wed Oct 28, 2009 2:30 am

I can't believe you actually brought food by. You are too much.


You picked up my daughter's necklace she had custom made in Jordan from our good Jordanian friend. I like to cook and greatly appreciated you acting as a liason and saying good things about my sweet girl.

I also told you a while back I would sometime make this for you since it is a healthy 'Bill' type food. I try to keep promises.

Thank you for keeping her necklace safe and bringing it to your karate class tonight.

Regards,
Vicki
Last edited by chef on Wed Oct 28, 2009 2:53 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby chef » Wed Oct 28, 2009 2:50 pm

So, Bill, how are the boys faring? Are they doing better?

...back to our subject matter.

Vicki
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Postby chef » Thu Oct 29, 2009 3:00 pm

Oops! Did I hijack the thread by asking how are your boys were faring, Bill?

I guess you just don't read every post. Oh well, it could be that I overwhelm others with my extroverted personality.

Won't ask you any more personal questions then.

Later,
Vicki
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Postby Bill Glasheen » Thu Oct 29, 2009 3:50 pm

One back in school, one more still at home battling "it."

I don't yet know what "it" is. It doesn't seem bad enough to be H1N1, but it's wiping the schools out.

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Re: The skinny on using commercial butter or udder nonsense?

Postby gmattson » Sun Jun 11, 2017 1:04 pm

Someone resurrected this post on diet and wanted me to post a reply and link:
It is a long and very interesting article, found here: : [url]: https://www.jenreviews.com/mediterranean-diet/[/url]

The post is interesting and contains a number of contributions from our dear departed friend Vicky.
============================================
Potentially the world’s healthiest way of eating, the Mediterranean diet is based on the traditional foods that were consumed by populations in Italy and Greece throughout history.

The diet emphasizes produce, fish, whole grains, and health fats – encouraging a high intake of fibre, moderate consumption of meats and alcohol, and tons of antioxidants. Followers of this diet will also enjoy meals with their loved ones – cooking as a family, eating as a family, and sharing a glass of red wine after dinner as a family.

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Eating plenty of fresh, non-starchy produce is key to the Mediterranean diet. You’ll want to shoot for at least five servings each day, with each serving being approximately one cup of raw produce. Healthy fats are also encouraged – coming from things like olive oil, nuts, fish, and avocado.


Legumes not only contain a ton of these necessary fats, but add a hefty boost of protein – and lean protein from non-meat sources is another cornerstone of this diet. To follow the Mediterranean diet as recommended, aim to eat a serving of legumes (a half-cup, cooked) at least twice a week, and a small handful of nuts every day.

Protein from fish and eggs is also encouraged – two to three times each week. Dairy protein, derived from milk products like yogurt and fresh cheeses, should be consumed daily. Try to get one to three servings of dairy, one cup of milk or yogurt or one ounce of cheese. Lean meats and poultry are welcome in the diet, but these are to be enjoyed in moderation.

Carbohydrates are included in this diet, as well. Refined carbs, however, are discouraged – as these will cause issues with your blood sugar. Aim for four small portions of whole grain carbs each day – whole-wheat bread, pasta made from quinoa, or sprouted or fermented grains. These should always be consumed with healthy fats and protein, to ensure proper digestion and nutrient absorption.

You should also enhance your meals with fresh herbs and spices, which are full of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Drink plenty of water, but also coffee, tea, and even a glass of red wine each day.

Where did it come from?
This diet is a nutritional model based on the lifestyle of the people of the Mediterranean throughout their history – preserving their traditions and customs and encouraging things like seasonal eating, ethical choices, and even sustainable development. This area of the world is known by historians as “the cradle of society,” since it is within this region that the majority of ancient civilization took place.

As a diet, this model began increasing in popularity with Western societies after the 1950s. An American scientist, Ancel Keys, noticed that poor populations in the small towns of southern Italy were somehow healthier than most of New York’s wealthiest citizens. To determine how this was possible, Keys embarked on a study to determine the relationship between these populations to their diets – and the nutritional value of the foods the Mediterranean people were consuming.

In fact, this study inspired the first “Food Pyramid” released by the United States Department of Agriculture – a guideline developed to represent a fair and balanced way of eating. However, the processed and refined alternatives to the natural foods consumed by Mediterranean populations changed the way the diet impacted Western eaters.

The more modern concept behind the Mediterranean diet recognizes the havoc these foods can wreak on our bodies, and encourages healthier, more natural options – similar to those that would have been used by the ancient Mediterranean civilizations.
GEM
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