Framing

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Framing

Postby fivedragons » Sun Aug 16, 2015 3:59 am

I will struggle with this, so please bear with me.

Ever notice how things change, depending on the way they are looked at? It has been shown in multiple studies of the mind/body interface, that what is suggested becomes the outcome.

Take, for example, an exercise where two people act out a predetermined conflict. If it is suggested that this is a technique that needs to be memorized, in order to survive a specific act of aggression, it becomes one thing.

If it is suggested that this is an example of a principle, and should be used as a way to find the feeling of structure and movement needed for effect, it becomes another thing.

I will try to expand on this later.
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Re: Framing

Postby fivedragons » Sun Aug 16, 2015 4:28 am

Consider the difference in framing: "If someone attacks you this way, you grab their wrist and apply pressure to their elbow at this spot, and follow up with this combination of strikes".

"If you happen to trap the arm, you can apply pressure on this reflex point of nerve and tendon, in order to hyper-extend the joint. It works the same way, no matter what position you might find yourself in. Here is an example of this principle. The meta-principle is to continue to do damage until you can safely disengage, so here are some targets."
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Re: Framing

Postby Bill Glasheen » Sun Aug 16, 2015 11:21 pm

I find people bring their prejudices and tendencies into the martial arts school with them. So if you have a mind that sees patterns, you will see a bigger picture. If you're a person with a less inquisitive mind who learns by memory, you'll likely be a literalist.

If I had a dollar for every time some idiot (no names mentioned) said "That's not Uechi!! :bad-words:" I could probably earn a salary posting on here. But going way back before martial arts, I've refused to be defined by other people and disciplines. Me an engineer? I'm a personality outlier. Catholic upbringing? I really don't need a book to understand The Golden Rule, and don't need someone else to tell me what I believe and how I think.

Among other things, I tutor both my boys and some friends (pro bono) going through school. One of my friends had a creative writing instructor who implored her students to "find their voice". This in my opinion is the end game of martial arts. I am not a maker of Bill Glasheen clones in the dojo, and I (thankfully) am not defined by authoritarian personalities dressed in white pajamas. I came to martial arts with a greater purpose in mind, and don't need a recipe book. Heck... since I was a chemist for a few years, I don't really use cookbooks when I cook. I'll read 3 or 4 recipes on how to make a dish, and then decide how I'm going to do it.

So yea... I'm the guy in search of principles over specifics. The way my brain works, that's easier for me. If I get it, I don't need to memorize it; it's mine. More importantly... Nature never really repeats herself. If you're looking for exact fits in life, you're going to have to do a whole lot of memorizing before walking out the front door.

- Bill
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Re: Framing

Postby fivedragons » Mon Aug 17, 2015 12:11 am

The system I am exploring right now has so many two person sets that It brings the whole memorizing techniques for specific attacks paradigm to the level of the absurd. But when you actually look at them from a distance you see that they all teach the same thing using different examples.

They all teach targeting the vulnerable parts of the body in order to do damage. The targets are repeated over and over, in different combinations, using different ways of attacking them, from "kata" to "kata", some are removed and some are added, until there are nothing but targets of opportunity.

They all use the same basic stances and the same gross motor body mechanics.

The all use the same circular movements to react to incoming movement, while changing the way that these circles can be used, depending on what happens in the moment. They can turn out to be flinches, blocks, strikes, traps, leverages, etc.

Very interesting so far.

It is almost as if someone took the movements in the solo forms and exploded them into a holographic representation of probabilities and possibilities.
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Re: Framing

Postby fivedragons » Mon Aug 17, 2015 2:00 am

Bill: "One of my friends had a creative writing instructor who implored her students to "find their voice". This in my opinion is the end game of martial arts."

I agree, and I think that is the end game of any discipline. 8)
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