Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 9:02 pm

Chris McKaskell

Very, very interesting....some of the responses I have received make much more sense now...

Funny, as an employer I am always interested to speak with other martial artists who apply...I have yet to hire one, but not because of their MA.

And I can see my own bias in being excited to speak with them.

But the liability exposure had never occurred to me -- of course, in any given disagreement a good lawyer will make wine out of water...even here, in Canada.

Chris
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:00 pm

Power breathing

An essential skill of Elite Performers In The Zone

For a complete presentation of this very important human performance skill, you can order the book at http://www.ffbackpain.com/FORMgallery1.htm

Additional clarification of the value of Power Breathing in The Position of Strength in Golf, can be found in Dr. Ray's sequel to In The zone, Teeing Off With the Masters: A Sport Psychology Novel which can be ordered at the link provided above.

Dr. Ray Mulry's Audio CD, Trust Your Swing: The Power of the Pendulum and Rhythmic Flow provides a unique training tool when learning how to develop a perfect, fluent golf swing.

The CD can also be ordered at the link provided above.

The following is an excerpt from Dr.Ray Mulry's Sport Psychology book,

In The Zone: Making Winning Moments Your Way of Life.....
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:03 pm

Power Breathing in Sports

Regular practice of the Position of Strength (balanced posture) coordinated with Exhaling Into The Exertion (Power Breathing) will help you form beneficial habits of correct, full-body movements.

This self-training will prove useful in all your physical activities.

If you want to improve your golf swing, your tennis game, batting average or your bowling score, you will always do better when you use Power Breathing in the Position of Strength.

Athletes and coaches often gain valuable insights that improve their performance by watching skilled specialists in other sports. You can use this cross training tool.

For example, the chances are that you've never tried fencing, and don't intend to. But if you look at fencing technique, you can see a very pure example of the effective use of Power Breathing.

The lunge is one of the fundamental moves in fencing. In simple terms, it is a long step forward with the leading foot as the fencer attempts to reach an opponent with the point of the sword.

It is by far the most rapid attack a fencer can make.

When a lunge is performed, it is common to hear the fencer make a ki-ai like sound which is, once again, the coordination of breathing, full-body movement, and mental concentration.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:06 pm

THE GRUNT

Anyone who follows tennis knows of Jimmy Connors and how he often makes a ki-ai sound as his racket meets the ball.

I don't happen to know how and why Connors began this practice, but it's clear that when you serve or return a tennis ball, coordination, timing, power and accuracy are increased as you Exhale Into The Exertion at the moment of impact.

As other tennis stars picked up this technique, it aroused a log of notice, not all of it favorable. In August of 1992, USA Today reported "Grunts gone, Seles loses in silence."

Monica Seles was the number one woman professional in the world of tennis, winner of six grand slam titles and had gained a certain reputation for her so called "grunting."

Because of media attention and complaints from other players, Seles cut back on her grunting and subsequently lost three consecutive finals. In fact, she lost to a player she had previously beaten ten consecutive times.

Seles had learned the breathing technique behind the grunt from Sport Psychologist, James Loehr, and claims it boosts her intensity and aggressiveness during competition.

In defense of Seles, tennis great Chris Evert said, "You need to grunt, and most players do." Similarly, Brett Newman, ranked in the top five in the nation in table tennis, told me "the breathing technique is use, namely Power Breathing, helped me to develop an extremely powerful smash and forehand loop in Table Tennis."


During the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, sportscasters amused by the "screaming" observed during the during various competitive events, presented a mini-special on "Olympic Screamers".

Power Breathing was observable in the Hammer Throw, Shot Put, Weight Lifting and many other events.

"We've got to scream to produce," one Olympian joked. Winning athletes take advantage of any competitive edge.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:07 pm

Here's a Uechi top master rank practitioner on the so called Uechi breathing standard...i.e., a short sssst after a strike

I find the standard shhhh breath between strikes is a difficult method to believe in,without a scientific explanation of why.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:13 pm

Kanei Uechi Sensei, said to breathe naturally, which I take it to mean as the body requires at any specific moment in time.

This seems to jibe with modern studies that suggest to let the body breathe you instead of the other way around.

This means to me that the students who become familiar with the many ways the body works with the breathing under physical/psychological pressures of various kinds, are better equipped to breathe naturally.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:14 pm

Any of us, if ever involved in a real fight for survival on the street, would also be in the grip of the fight or flight reflex, which overloads our system with adrenaline and cuts our breath in dangerous ways.

Understanding how our individual bodies will work with the breathing under extreme stress, is critical.

Over the years I have seen many Students turn red and blue on the dojo floor while practicing, especially when under the stress of testing.

There are myriad ways to breathe and it should be more of a personal matter instead of being forced to breathe a specific way.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:20 pm

In these discussions of best ways to breathe, it is critical to keep in mind that you will not be the same person who is in the dojo when you are suddenly faced with having to deal with street violence and possibly end up dead or paralyzed by unforeseen attacks upon your person, either by multiple opponents or armed opponents.

This is a lesson very difficult to learn, since most of us have not and will not experience those psychological whippings.

The survival instinct will grip you immediately…there is no way to shunt it. Epinephrine plays a central role in the short-term stress reaction—the physiological response to threatening, [ Fight-or-flight response), It also reacts to stress induced anger.

It increases heart rate and stroke volume, dilates the pupils, and constricts arterioles in the skin and gut while dilating arterioles in leg muscles.


... Adverse reactions to epinephrine include palpitations, tachycardia, anxiety, headache, tremor, hypertension, and acute pulmonary edema.

….heart starts pumping very fast, all muscles get stiff and vision tunnels or gets blurred…you will not hear so well anymore.

It also expands air passages. All of these things work together in order to allow the body to circulate more oxygen into the lungs as well as more blood throughout the body.

Because more blood can go into the muscles at this time, some people are able to find themselves with more strength than they usually possess.

This relates back to the evolutionary process when adrenalin used as a physical response that humans and animals were able to use to defend and protect themselves.

But there are downsides…your breathing rate increases and many people will hyperventilate…some people will suffer heart attacks or strokes…we have seen students go red/blue and almost stop breathing during a test…most concerning when involving students of middle age and beyond...and physical factors...which I won't go into.

In order to deal with the seriousness of these complication when fighting for our survival…we need to learn how to let our breathing flow freely depending on demands of the body…


and never program any restrictions such as holding the breath when striking and 'sshhhing' through pursed lips after the strike.

This is only one way of breathing...and so be it…but you don't want to imbed this only way when you must really fight for survival.

There are no guarantees that you can control an adrenaline dump, sometimes it will simply get the best of you.

However, if you learn to control your breathing and match your breathing to your motion you will have the best chance to control the adrenaline dump.

… The intensity of your breathing should automatically match the intensity of your work. Often our breathing lags behind and we end up in an oxygen deficiency state which makes everything more difficult….I see this happen on the dojo floor frequently.

Example: You start to increase the pace of your workout Kata/sparring etc._ but don't change your breathing until your oxygen level has dropped dramatically in the blood.

Now you start to breathe harder and deeper but your cells are already starved and behind the power curve.

Therefore learning to match your breathing with your motion is a big help, that way you automatically adjust your breathing to match the work at the beginning.

When doing hard techniques or load…. or during an intense situation inhale through the nose and exhale through the mouth…. forcefully… but never completely….which will then cause the body to immediately breathe back in to restore oxygen and load up for the next stressful action you may need to make.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:22 pm

Bill Glasheen
I think the correct way to think of it is the way another of Van's friends likes to think of it. Instead of thinking of breathing driving the power, we can think of the movement itself breathing us.

We can "be breathed" by our whole-body mechanics. This fits with the description of Uechi Ryu as "hard on the outside, and soft on the inside." If we don't hold that breath when we move, breathing will naturally happen. Then you can go with it and dial it up as it seems and feels appropriate.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:27 pm

Now, how is breathing really taught in Okinawa and by whom and why?

Surely there will be many opinions on this as well.

These comments by a high rank sensei, good friend, and veteran of many visits to Okinawa...wrote this

You know, in all my trips to Okinawa, how one breathes was NEVER an issue. Because there are so many that I have trained with and beside in their classes in Okinawa I can not remember all the particulars of each teacher.

I just know that we have to be aware of what one sensei wants so that when we get before him again that we don't make the same mistakes.

Breathing never came up as an issue, as to whether we were doing it wrong or correct. As long as you didn't pass out or turn blue it was acceptable.

I have watched carefully, as this is one of the things I take advantage of while on Okinawa, how the teachers perform and how their students perform and what the senseis expect of them and me. That is how I learn teaching techniques and subtleties of performance.

I have seen the "Uechi method" of breathing, I have seen the exhale on the strike in fact I have seen and heard Walters teacher Takara sensei exhale on the strike.

Nakahodo and Miyagi from the Shinjo lines use the 'old" breathing method that I, and I am sure you were introduced to 30 years ago. Where did this come from?

Well all these older teachers Van, Walter, Gorman, Jack, Bethoney, etc learned it somewhere because they all taught it at one time. Some have changed over time.

Why the change?, I think it was because as their bodies adapted to and became accustom to their breathing they didn't think of it any more. As their knowledge became greater and their understanding of what they were doing they figured it out, some changed, some didn't.

Whatever works for you is the best way.

Sanchin is an exercise, Uechi sanchin, is far different from Goju sanchin as far as breathing standards.

Sanchin breathing is far different from kata breathing demands, as is breathing when fighting different from kata breathing.

Who is right, who is wrong? I have no idea....
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:28 pm

Now, how is breathing really taught in Okinawa and by whom and why?

Surely there will be many opinions on this as well.

These comments by a high rank sensei, good friend, and veteran of many visits to Okinawa...wrote this

You know, in all my trips to Okinawa, how one breathes was NEVER an issue. Because there are so many that I have trained with and beside in their classes in Okinawa I can not remember all the particulars of each teacher.

I just know that we have to be aware of what one sensei wants so that when we get before him again that we don't make the same mistakes.

Breathing never came up as an issue, as to whether we were doing it wrong or correct. As long as you didn't pass out or turn blue it was acceptable.

I have watched carefully, as this is one of the things I take advantage of while on Okinawa, how the teachers perform and how their students perform and what the senseis expect of them and me. That is how I learn teaching techniques and subtleties of performance.

I have seen the "Uechi method" of breathing, I have seen the exhale on the strike in fact I have seen and heard Walters teacher Takara sensei exhale on the strike.

Nakahodo and Miyagi from the Shinjo lines use the 'old" breathing method that I, and I am sure you were introduced to 30 years ago. Where did this come from?

Well all these older teachers Van, Walter, Gorman, Jack, Bethoney, etc learned it somewhere because they all taught it at one time. Some have changed over time.

Why the change?, I think it was because as their bodies adapted to and became accustom to their breathing they didn't think of it any more. As their knowledge became greater and their understanding of what they were doing they figured it out, some changed, some didn't.

Whatever works for you is the best way.

Sanchin is an exercise, Uechi sanchin, is far different from Goju sanchin as far as breathing standards.

Sanchin breathing is far different from kata breathing demands, as is breathing when fighting different from kata breathing.

Who is right, who is wrong? I have no idea....
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 21, 2017 3:34 am

But then again we have the so called 'Uechi breathing method'...like you thrust while holding the breath, and after you complete the thrust, you perform a SHORT _'shsst' sound and then breathe in...right?

Let's see...this is found in Master Takimiyagi's book where he talks about Uechi breathing and I believe this is also found in the 'Blue Book' Master Uechi's Kihon
>>>Breathing methods. from Uechiryu and Shoheiryu for the 21st Century

An understanding of breathing methods must be present for effective kata performance.

Technical groups of movements are separated not only by pauses but by breaths within these pauses, which both articulate the kata rhythm and prepare the performer physically for the next set of movements.

The basic breathing method is that learned in SANCHIN kata; an " interrupted" breath, short sharp and explosive.


This is not an un aspirated exhalation but a clearly defined aspired 'hiss' originating from the strained abdomen and expelling air through the mouth.

The focus of the breath must be on the exhalation: replenishment of air must be allowed to take place naturally through the nose, immediately following the exhalation. This kind of breath is seen in all katas.

A second kind of breath is seen only in the upper ranks kata ( seichin, seisan, seiryu, kanchin, sanseiryu, and ryuko): this is a continuant breath, long and sustained.

The patterns of these two kinds of breaths occur in conjunction with variations in the pairs of opposite features, short and sharp breaths combining with long sustained breaths as the movements dictate.

Except in training kata sanchin, no breathing should be exercised in a regular structured pattern.

It should always take place in compliance with a performers physical demands.

These bodily demands, the logical divisions of techniques, and the combinations of the paired opposite features will determine the placement and type of breathing in a kata performance.
End. <<<


Is this what you are doing on the floor? I bet you are not.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 21, 2017 3:37 am

Scientific research has a way of moving on and leaving old beliefs in the dust.

All indications by scientific research into this subject seem to point to a focus on the exhale leaving the timing of the inhale to come naturally to equalize internal pressures, in this manner avoiding hyperventilation from too erratic breathing.

When under attack by 'adrenaline' it is best to breathe flowing with motion with intermittent burst of energy when needed in 'forces unloading' _ the 'forces' we so well gather in the execution of our beloved style.

Think of the torso between the bottoms of the ribs to the tops of the pelvic bowl as a slinky, one of those big loose springs kids get for Christmas.

Take a long hot dog balloon and blow it up inside the slinky.
The slinky becomes rigid and strong instead of floppy and soft.

However, the internal pressure puts a lot of stress on the diaphragm, especially where the esophagus and aorta pass through from thorax to abdomen; as well as the throat, glottis and vocal cords.

Therefore, one forces air through these openings, restricting the flow enough to keep the torso pressurized and at the same time allowing emergency over-pressure relief….

it is at the moment of the greatest stress brought about by forceful contact coupled with the changes to our system by the adrenaline surge…that air must be released through the small openings of throat and lips….which will result in an immediate 'in breath' to replenish .
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 21, 2017 3:39 am

Exhaling in the matter described above also has an added benefit: Uechi promotes the fusion of whipping and settling of our bodies down to create structure behind a strike.

Exhaling when settling the body weight into a strike aids in better force of fusion upon impact to a target…because this type of breathing can greatly assist muscular tension, provide a solid stance and explosive action.

How one conditions to breathe in and out is very important.

Only exhaling through the mouth in the partial release of our pressure structure….can accommodate the explosive, outward force necessary for committed martial arts striking techniques.


By properly exhaling during a strike you're are constricting your lungs, thereby causing more power with a wider range of movement capability.

You are controlling the adrenaline built up in your body to be released with greater exertion while exhaling, versus keeping it pent up inside during inhalation.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 21, 2017 3:55 am

I think where the confusion reigns here on breathing discussions is where the perception by many readers is that the power breathing only involves breathing with power moves or moves in general, with no breathing in between the moves.

Absolutely not so...

The answer, as Bill also pointed out is as per Scott Sonnon's studies of breathing mechanics in Russia...with the exhortation to be 'body breathed'...

you need to breathe in every which way as your body demands it...with the move, in between moves, and when just standing still.

The power breath as used in this discussion refers to the sharp short exhale with automatic quick inhale to replenish...just as you connect with your strike...a power strike...

It does not mean you need to exhale or whatever...with each move you make...
especially if the moves are not power strikes meant to solidify your structure to create the most damage.

Wehave a boxer trained by Petronelli in our dojo...a real fighter, as opposed to most of us 'air punchers'...and he was trained by Petronelli exactly the way I describe above.

It is a fighting breathing method that he learned from Petronelli as opposed to a kata method.
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