Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:32 pm

I had the scariest moment of my life once in my Norwood dojo, when one of my students collapsed during a 'Sanchin check'

He was foaming at the mouth and turning green. While waiting for the 911 call to respond with an ambulance, I tried to give him CPR but his teeth were clenched tight.

Then the police ran up the stairs and charged into the dojo...

In my shocked state, I tried to explain that nobody had knocked him out but that he had just collapsed in training.

Then the EMS responders arrived and said he had suffered a seizure.

I had no knowledge of his Epilepsy....what a nice kid. But we never saw him again after that episode...

When I think about it I still get the shakes.

If you are a teacher, it might be useful to ask about any pre-existing conditions...

your 'due diligence' standard.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:33 pm

Bill,
As you know, in addition to Commotio-cordis, blows to the chest can also cause Contusio-Cordis.

Here is a report of a 30 year old professional soccer player hit in the chest by a 'power soccer ball'

Considering the clinical presentation of the patient, the normal coronary angiography, and the findings of the CMR examination, we made the diagnosis of contusio cordis.

The patient was advised to refrain from strenuous physical activity for a month. At the 6-week follow-up, the patient was symptom free, and his ECG changes normalized with complete resolution of the ST- and T-wave abnormalities.

On the follow-up CMR examination, both the regional wall motion abnormality and edema were no longer present.

On the late gadolinium-enhancement images, the focal region with hyperenhancement persisted, still involving 6% of the left ventricular myocardial mass, reflecting permanent myocardial structural damage.


The heart muscle is nothing to 'toy' with.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:35 pm

The 'killer kick' soccer players and goal keepers fear the most is the one that comes in with no spin...

'dead weight' flying at you like a musket ball.

Image
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:39 pm

I was discussing the 'chest beating' for conditioning and testing, we see in Uechi Ryu, the other night with Jim Maloney and Art Rabesa, and we reminisced about this 'practice' we were submitted to years back.

Maloney reported a case where someone hit in the chest by a punch in a fight died from the CC condition.

Now I am informed that in Uechi, this particular aspect of conditioning goes under the name of:

MUNEKAN-KITAE
Pounding of the chest area


And it reminds me of monkeys/gorillas pounding their chest.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:40 pm

Bill Glasheen

Maybe this so called 'conditioning' has a sexual root... known as 'red chesting'

'Red Chested' _ The sexual act where the partner on top repeatedly slaps or punches the bottom partner's chest...

Guy 1:aw man my chest is still throbbing from last night
Guy 2: what for?
Guy 1:because my girl red chested me so hard last night


Damn…I suspected the old Okinawan masters knew the real reason behind chest pounding. :mrgreen:

Bill
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:41 pm

Bill

For the lay folk:
•The "P" wave is when the atrium contracts. The atrium contains the heart "pace maker" (SA node) which can be modulated by vagal input. The two atriums are the chambers where the blood first comes in from the body after being used (right atrium) or back from the lung after being oxygenated (left atrium).
...
•The "QRS" wave is when the ventricles contract. The ventricles are the main pumping chambers.
...
•The "T" wave is when the heart is repolarizing. Note how it's in the middle of that phase with part of the cardiac muscle in latency phase and part repolarized where things can go wrong.


Bill
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 21, 2017 4:01 pm

Then there is 'contusio cordis' worth taking another look at:
Here's one case:

Considering the clinical presentation of the patient, the normal coronary angiography, and the findings of the CMR examination, we made the diagnosis of contusio cordis.

The patient was advised to refrain from strenuous physical activity for a month. At the 6-week follow-up, the patient was symptom free, and his ECG changes normalized with complete resolution of the ST- and T-wave abnormalities.

On the follow-up CMR examination, both the regional wall motion abnormality and edema were no longer present.

On the late gadolinium-enhancement images, the focal region with hyperenhancement persisted, still involving 6% of the left ventricular myocardial mass, reflecting permanent myocardial structural damage.


If you are a teacher...just do away with chest banging...

If you are a student...protect your centerline area...and learn to blade and offline...wauke 'blocks' notwithstanding...

The smart fighter will use the wauke concept to intercept and redirect for the most part, as he has no idea how powerful and 'long reaching' his opponent will be.

The combination of the wauke with the offline angled 'shoot offs' the way sensei Itokazu was reported to have been a master at...

is the safest and more efficient way to counter an attack.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 22, 2017 4:58 pm

On being a witness

When, as a field casualty agent, interviewing witness...two important points we had to contend with:

1. Emotion and adrenaline factor... also affect a witness in much the same ways as it does the actors of an event.

This ...Had a significant effect on what they were able to distinguish, how their brain tagged the details it_ sensed through the eyes, ears, etc. _ to words.

2. Many people refused to be interviewed for fear of reprisal one way or another, or fear of being systematically destroyed emotionally by a defense attorney or prosecutor when testifying.

~~

But there is something more sinister:
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:01 pm

Gabe Suarez
Some points from reality on being a witness. (Specially in states where your human right to own weapons and use them for self-defense is denied).

The crime goes down, and you decide to be a good witness. The cops arrive and will get all your personal info.

In places like LA they will also run your for warrants and such (if you are a wanted man, do not be any kind of witness).

That personal info will be written into a police report and will become public information. Will the bad guys get a copy of the report? You bet your sweet gazzippies the attorney representing them will demand it.

Will your name be on it? It depends if the officer releasing the copy or the DA handing it over black it out or not...my experience has been they do not.

So would you walk over to the murderer you are planning to testify against and hand him your driver's license? No? Hmmmm. That is in effect what you will do.

Think the cops will protect you? Do we really need to go into that???

Another thing, unless the bad guy admits he was caught red handed and does not contest the charges, it will inevitably go to trial.

Every single time it does, you will be subpoenaed and be required to show up.

How much time can you take away from work? Justice is much more important than your mortgage...sorry.

I am not saying NEVER to be a witness, but understand the baggage that comes with it. There are very few events I will intervene in that do not directly involve me, and fewer that I will volunteer as a witness.

That is my personal perspective on it. Sorry to burst any bubbles.

~ Gabe Suarez
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:03 pm

I have talked about pre-existing conditions that might become exacerbated by physical or emotional events...

One witness, in a case of negligent homicide that I handled, collapsed and died while in court waiting to be called to the stand. The stress is considerable.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:04 pm

Also consider the times when a victim of an assault, will not be able to identify the assaillant because of the mental block the adrenaline surge might cause.

Same reasons why many of the techniques we learn, armed or unarmed, can become totally useless in a fight.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:06 pm

Take for example the reason why police officers issued sidearms_ do not have a safety [under stress the officer ether forgets it is there or is unable to manipulate it]_ Thus the popularity of the Glock pistol.

Also, the reason why deadly force trainers teach not to ever try to manipulate the small slide release catch on a semiauto pistol when reloading but instead to grasp the slide forcefully, and yank it back to get the pistol to go into battery.

Same for any fancy moves with a blade.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:09 pm

Lawyers are very slick to ask about distances, lighting conditions, weather conditions, etc, etc during cross examination.

Soon after making an arrest I would return to the crime scene to pace off distances, see where light sources were located and would go over my reports to remember what I had written about the perps clothing, facial hair, etfc, etc,

For the civilian try to get plate numbers, the direction that the perp escaped to, height, weight, clothing, type of vehicle and things such as that.

If you ever do testify don't be afraid to say, "I don't recall" when asked questions about time, distance, etc, etc. ( If, in fact, you really don't remember)
~ Suarez Intl
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:11 pm

When out with a friend or a willing to play the game spouse, have him or her suddenly ask you (at a time of their choosing) things like "okay, tell me about the people in the 7-11 we just left."

Or "okay, tell me about the people in the booth behind you." Or "okay, what was so and so wearing in the shootout scene of the movie. What did his attackers look like?"

This will force you to start becoming more aware of your surroundings, develop a better eye for particulars, and actually activate neural pathways that seldom get much use/practice.
Suarez
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:12 pm

There is a time for that but consider all consequences of getting involved.

Some of these people are not the poor granny getting beaten up by a gang, but are simply one thug group kicking another thug to the deck.

Will you risk yourself for them?

Think it over both before drawing the gun, or the phone.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45338
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

PreviousNext

Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests