Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:19 am

What was your plan if the three hadn't been intimidated by your handgun? If they had spread out? If one or multiple drew weapons of their own? Did you have cover?

Had you planned movement to another piece of cover? Did you have sufficient ammunition to deal with three threats? Since you were at your car, did you have a blow out kit on hand? How would the presence of a stakeout shotgun have changed your response?

Maybe a weird question...but the knife-wielding thug clearly intended to do you harm with a deadly weapon. Why didn't you shoot him right there? I'm not suggesting you should have done so, and everything worked out quite well clearly. But sometimes Fortuitous outcomes reinforce bad tactics, as the saying goes.

Were you just lucky that they were intimidated? How would watching their knife wielding buddy's face turn to pink mist have changed that? Would it have been legally justified?

What kind of training do you think you need or should obtain to better prepare for the next time these guys return to your business?

What's to stop them from coming back another time when you aren't there and your wife/children/employees are? Are they are prepared as you?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 11, 2017 1:35 pm

On #2, I wouldn't have backed up because it required you to take your eyes off of the threat to move to the rear. Be conscious not to get that close in the future. Carry appendix so you don't have to put your pistol where you can get to it easier. If you must predraw it in a vehicle put it under your thigh. It is relatively secure there. Never set it down.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 11, 2017 1:48 pm

From Gabe Suarez forum...a very important read for all of us.

Consent Search; The Myth

The 4th Amendment affirms "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures..." You have the right to be secure in your person, house and effects. This means you have constitutional guarantees of privacy. There are ways to remove those guarantees for investigators. The tools most commonly used are search warrants and the consent search. We won't deal with search warrants here, but we'll briefly look at the consent search.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 11, 2017 1:50 pm

As an investigator, author of many search warrants, and one who ardently believes in limited government, I write this to the law enforcement officer, suspect, investigative lead and witness alike.

Consent search is a tool used by law enforcement to gain permission from the property owner or person with legal standing to voluntarily access an area to conduct an investigation, search and seize items believed to be of evidentiary value.

Without the granting of voluntary access (read CONSENT) a written court order would be required - this is your search warrant. Search warrants may be used for felony crimes and require probable cause to be established whereupon a magistrate may grant and issue a search warrant. A consent search just requires your permission.

May I want to use a consent search when I don't believe I've established probable cause - absolutely. Some may call it "fishing" and most people, since they "support law enforcement" are all to quick to voluntary consent away their constitutional rights.

Remember, with a consent search one foregoes the third party magistrate who uses his training and experience to determine if probable cause has been established and the desired items to be seized are indeed of evidentiary value.

You're saying, "Sure, come in. I love you guys" just flushes several layers of caution and assistance the Constitution afforded you.

But, don't worry about it, everything you say, do, or we see can and will be used against you right? Then cool, just open that door.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 11, 2017 2:12 pm

If you're beginning to think I don't believe in consent searches you're absolutely right. But wait! How can a detective sergeant not be a proponent of a tool which easily, quickly and without issues removes the logistics of typing a document, convincing a magistrate and being held accountable???

Simple this..... For the citizen -

I don't trust you to not allege your consent wasn't voluntary because you felt obliged to give it as there were uniformed, armed officers at your door.

I don't trust you to say you weren't scared, felt intimidated or threatened at the Voluntariness Hearing and thereby suppressing my evidence.

For the law enforcement officer - don't be lazy - get a warrant.

You simply can't be standing on someone's property in uniform and armed and not expect them to feel obliged to help you or scared.

You'll always have a tough time in the Voluntariness Hearing and even with a signed consent form the magistrate will simply ask you how many uniformed personnel were on scene.

He'll hear a number, look at you, and say, "You should have done a warrant." Finally, for law enforcement, getting a warrant is just like going to Grand Jury for an indictment.

It is always - always - always good to get a second opinion by an independent party to ensure you've met the requirements for probable cause and what you want is good to go. Like an indictment, having a warrant shows the jury downrange you've got good intentions and didn't have to rely on consent to circumvent an independent party.

So, if you support law enforcement make them get a warrant as it forces them to hold a very high standard.
If you support yourselves, make law enforcement get a warrant so you know someone else agrees with them they should be allowed to come onto your property and take your stuff.

Gentlemen, consent searches are bullshit and are the lazy man's way out.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 11, 2017 2:19 pm

Brent Yamamoto
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I treat all officers with polite professionalism. But I just assume their job is to help the state convict me. As such they are not on my side.

Again, I support LE. But they don't know that, and if they are talking to me I would never assume they have my interests in mind.

What I have seen is that some who are supportive of LE assume that officers will somehow know that. That officers will somehow know you're the good guy and be on your side as a result. To add to that problem, good people WANT to talk...they want t be honest and share info with the cop interviewing them. They will share more than they should.

I don't think it's in your best interest to assume a cop is on your side. Best simply to be polite but wary, and step carefully.

A bunch of cops are among my favorite people. But that's because we're friends, and we know each other. A cop I do not know is a different story.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 11, 2017 2:54 pm

No blood chokes over forty...

For those over 40 - think long and hard about styles that do a lot of blood chokes! By that age - many of us have significant atherosclerotic plaque, especially in the carotid artery system.

Repeated compression is just asking for a piece of plaque to dislodge and travel up to the brain. Such occlusive or thrombotic strokes are the most common form of stroke - and best avoided if at all possible.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:33 pm

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:21 am

Was watching an early Harrison Ford movie last night (slow night) called "Regarding Henry". Kind of a sleeper with little excitement but one scene absolutely left a mark.

Story line has to do with his recouperation from a gun shot to the head. The scene when it happened was one that runs through my head as a very good example of how quickly the unexpected can happen.

The guy (Henry) walked out at night to the neighborhood convenience store for cigs. He walks into the store and the clerk is standing behind the counter with a typically looking BG standing at the counter with one hand on the counter, the other dropped straight down with his hand out of site.

They both just look at Henry with blank looks on their faces, no words or movement, just a look. Henry pauses for a few seconds and tells the clerk he wants some cigs and holds up his cash.

Nobody moves, just longer looks. Henry asks again and the BG then raises his hidden hand which is holding a gun. Henry is speechless and just stutters a bit, saying again he only wants cigs and he's had a bad day. Still nobody moves until finally the BG shoots Henry in the shoulder.

Henry mumbles something but otherwise doesn't really do anything else. Then, BG shoots Henry in the forehead. Henry looks blankly at him and falls backward into the door. BG walks out the door.

It struck me that this one scene is probably as realistic as it gets in depicting how the completely unexpected can happen, how quickly it can happen and the importance of always being ready, which includes always expecting the unexpected.

Unless,you're having trouble sleeping, you can stop the movie at this point but this one scene really hits home! Be aware, equipped and trained in both body and mind
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Aug 13, 2017 5:18 am

As a general rule, when I stop I stay back far enough to see the vehicle's tires touching pavement in front of me and no closer. This leaves you room to maneuver out if you need to, either with a U turn or ramping the median or curb depending on which side of the road you're on.

As far as ramming, it depends on the vehicle. The heavier and higher the vehicle the better it is for that purpose. I would recommend low speed ramming when dealing with people, not for their safety but because most newer vehicles have impact sensors and airbag triggers, make too solid of contact with something you can disable your vehicle.

I recommend slowing down but keeping your forward momentum rolling. resist the urge to hit the brakes.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Aug 13, 2017 8:49 pm

Here's a good book by Gabe Suarez that should be extremely useful to any of us driving a car...even if we don't have any CCW permits.

https://suarezinternational.com/vehicle ... el-suarez/

This book is intended for the interested individual civilian defender, for the concerned businessman travelling in a "hot" area, the woman trying to evade a vehicular stalker, or any of the thousands of good guys that are caught in their cars by bad guys.

The bad guys already know all of this material. These days everyone has a need-to-know.

I need to say that this is just a basic text for those not familiar with tactical driving.

I'll touch on tactical thinking and awareness, making certain your car is suitable for these methods, techniques of high-speed driving for beginners, as well as the various concepts of cornering, evasive turns, and even a discussion of ramming.

You don't need to be an EP professional, or an Indy champ to pull this stuff off. A few careful practice sessions are all you need and you will retain the skills for a very long time.


In these days of 'constant tailgating' by some idiot or punk with a pick up...I think the techniques in the book should be a great addition to your martial arts skills.

Being tailgated by people is a daily occurrence and a maddening one that can put your life at risk. Sometimes you wish you had a cannon instead of tailpipes.

So learning how to turn the tables on some bastard tailgating you is an important aspect of self protection.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Aug 14, 2017 5:37 pm

As I have indicated many times on this forum, one of my favorite force on force trainers, is Gabe Suarez who runs a wonderful forum here

http://www.warriortalk.com/forum.php?s= ... ea1b07cfdd

And this is one of his articles that I think all of us martial artists can identify with:

Gabe
Chasing Two Dogs...

I am getting many questions about training so I will prepare a number of articles to answer most of these questions. Here are a couple.

1). Can I mix HIIT with strength workouts?
2). What about the concept of "training for the fight" in regards to distance running?

I am answering them together as they are the same question..really. And as to the title of the thread? You cannot chase two different dogs at the same time, and expect to catch either one.

It is tempting to do that, but understand that each workout type has a focus. Think in terms of shooting as fast as humanly possible...as fast as you can slap the trigger...but trying to hit a steel at 100 yards that way. The two are completely in disagreement, and there must be a balance. And for there to be a balance, you must understand what your goal is.

It is to compete at the World's Strongest Man, or to win the Boston Marathon? Trust me, success will be as scarce as clothing on a French beach. As well, unless you are a candidate for a UFC contract, focusing on "being able to fight" is not the goal either. That last one is a matter of technical expertise and a combination of fitness characteristics. So what is the goal?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Aug 14, 2017 5:38 pm

A). Strength. You must have strength and train for it. Based on physical characteristics alone, who is more likely to be able to fight off a couple of muggers best...a 130 pound ultra marathoner, or a 200 pound lean powerlifter? Do we really need to discuss this? As well, I suspect the powerlifter looks better at the beach, has his bones and hormonal balance remaining strong into old age, etc.

How do we get strong? Easy. We lift heavy things in ways that affect the greatest number of muscles. There are a myriad ways to do this but think Bench Press, Squats, Deadlifts...stuff like that. As a benchmark, you should be able to bench and squat 1.5 times your bodyweight. Easier on the squat than the bench but we all need goals. You should be able to deadlift 2x your bodyweight.

You will not do any of these if you just spend an hour on the eliptical, or putting in the miles for your next 10K, or spent an hour on the heavy bag.

There should be strength days and there should be days devoted to other things.

An interesting byproduct, if your diet is protein-rich and consistent, is that more strength generally means more muscle. And more muscle means less fat.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Aug 14, 2017 5:40 pm

B). Agility and Conditioning. These two attributes are the way we get to use our strength. You can be really good at deadlifting 400#, but if you spend no time applying the strength you have developed you are only good at...deadlifting 400#. This is where HIIT, or high intensity interval training comes in.

We can also call it the Sprint Concept. I will tell you right here...I Gabe Suarez, do not mix strength days and sprint days on a normal basis. Why not is simple. If I am smoked from 100 yard dashes, I will not do my best on the squats and deadlifts. Conversely, if I have just set a new PR on the deadlift, thinking I am going to pull off a great max effort sprint workout is ridiculous.

The HIIT/Sprint concept is easy to do, takes less time than a regular workout and is another great way to reduce fat. It also teaches you to move well. You learn several things about body mechanics sprinting up a hill, doing farmer carries, or turkish get ups, as well as from box jumps, and athletic events such as those.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Aug 14, 2017 5:51 pm

Gabe
C). Endurance. Of the three, this is the least one you have to worry about as it will become a byproduct of the other two. A good friend of mine is a long time bicyclist. He began focusing on sprints and lifting a while back.

When he attempted a very long arduous ride, he reported no loss in his endurance, even though what he had been focusing on had been anything but endurance focused. Look at the sprinters in the Olympics and then at the marathon runners. Who is more capable of more athletic things?

If you spend your training time seeking endurance, you will not be strong nor conditioned. But if you seek the first two, with a minor inclusion of endurance periodically, you will in fact have all three. Me? I include a back country ruck march...or a run every couple of weeks, but the focus of my time is spent in Strength and HIIT pursuits.

Other issues: Diet is an important matter. You cannot out run or out train a crappy diet. I think we have discussed that one at length. Rest is also important. Try for eight hours each night and do not settle for less than 7. Yes, that means you will have to catch The Vikings later on Hulu, but watching Ragnar kill an Englishman will not reduce your belly fat like sleep will.

So, do NOT train for the fight. Train to be strong agile and explosive. The ability to do what your body and circumstances call for will be improved far more than if you specialized.
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