Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:35 pm

This is not so simple. For example, in the case I had where the black belt was shouting for help while ambushed in a stair well by a Jamaican gang banger and being knifed to death/having his throat cut...would any of you really have opened the door of your apartment and intervened?

http://familysafety.bangordailynews.com ... n-assault/

And don't forget your potential liability exposure:

In the state of Massachusetts:

Section 13: ''Good Samaritans''; liability


Section 13. No person who, in good faith, provides or obtains, or attempts to provide or obtain, assistance for a victim of a crime as defined in section one, shall be liable in a civil suit for damages as a result of any acts or omissions in providing or obtaining, or attempting to provide or obtain, such assistance unless such acts or omissions constitute willful, wanton or reckless conduct.


Your intervention will be scrutinized along those standards.

$$$
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:21 pm

Alan K »

We, in the martial arts are saddened, angry and shocked that an unarmed violent killing was permitted to occur without an intervention by anyone within a small crowd of bystanders.

I never realized the full impact of that crime until I was having dinner at my girl friend's house, with she and her visiting mother, who is 83 years old. Mother asked me if I had heard of this case in Maine.

With the vast media coverage afforded to it, a large segment of the New England population probably knew of it.

I could sense her fear as we discussed this case.

My point is that this monster has probably instilled dread or fear into many innocent elderly people, who have enough problems to cope with in life.

The problem is that if any able bodied man in the group had intervened, and the perpertrator had killed the lout with a ko, resulting in death by the fact that the perp fell on his head, there would be an inquiry.

He should have been given a medal, but instead was given the inquisition to determine if his force was reasonable in the circumstance.

The Goddess of Justice is Blind!

Alan K
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:31 pm

Dojo v. Street

1] In the dojo you and your sparring/fighting partner begin engagement contemporaneously, at a certain distance, and with your guard up.

On the street, most often you will be caught unaware and by surprise, possibly as you look up to read a street sign or have your ear glued to your cell phone blabbing away as a lot of us do constantly.

If you get hit in the head, when so distracted, once or more times, you will be stunned at best, even if momentarily, and prevented to launch a ready, efficient response action.

2] in the dojo, usually we confront one on one, and we program this way for the most part.

In the street today you will be up against multiple opponents. One on one_ fights are rarer than rare considering the locales where fights usually flare up.

3] In spite of dreams to the contrary, you will be up against bigger, meaner opponents than you, as usually smaller persons, with exceptions of course, do not engage a big target.

So you may find yourself up against a 230 pounds drunken beast, or two. If you are a small person , even with your training you will be at a decided dis-advantage

And be careful with your assumptions of techniques that work so well for you in the dojo...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:33 pm

4] You may think so now, but you will not be able to “control” the heavy blows of such berserker adversary. Best you can hope for under the panic of the moment [and panicky you will be] is to avoid those charges from impacting on you.


5] You feel more secure because you are armed? Well, don’t think that a broken bottle or an improvised bludgeon will hurt less than your knife du jour from the escrima official federation.


6] In dojo sparring and scenario training, you will never go “all the way” or there would be injuries or death half way through the lessons.

On the street the situation is a bit different: the beast facing you wants to hurt you bad, real bad, really _really bad., and your mind will have difficulty adjusting to it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:34 pm

7) For those obsessed with ground fighting, if you get into a scuffle with multiple opponents, which probably is the way your fight will go these days, in a split second you will find yourself on the ground with your head and ribs kicked in, that is if all goes well.

8) The best defense on the street is good common sense instead of thinking about becoming a “killing machine” [But there are people who still believe in such stupidity]

9) You may delude yourself with your imagined speed and stopping power, but bullets and knifings are faster than your fists and they hurt more.


10] In many cases your assailant will be a robber, and usually he will have nothing to lose, thus he will be more dangerous than you who has all to lose. And this will eat at your mind in a split second, creating confusion.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:36 pm

11) Remember that your “street smarts” and connivance is king. One of the best surprise counters is a vicious head butt after closing in on the adversary under the pretext of giving up or placate or making peace.

On the flip side, keep your distance at all times.


12) What you will never experience in the dojo, and you will learn on the street is that the psychological pressure of a real street fight, which may end up with serious injury or death, can break the most determined spirit of a martial artist by blocking his mind and thus the body.

Only the persons who have experienced prior real street fights have a better chance of remaining in control, or losing control at the right moment without freezing or choking.


13) If , by your nature, you are a calm , non aggressive person, regardless of any training you will never be a “killing machine” with your techniques on the street.

A killer instinct you are born with__ it will never develop by training.

The famous boxer's “killer instinct” is not taught in any boxing stable__ It is either there or it isn’t. So don’t spend money and waste time trying to develop one.


14) You may not have seen your own blood in the way you will see it run in rivulets in your street fight.

You are simply not used at the sight of your blood that way, and it will scare you and freeze you.

If you don’t believe this, just try it out, have someone give you a nice nosebleed.

And in the heat of combat people do take notice of their lifeblood slipping away; it has to do with programmed self-preservation.


15] Do not be seduced by talk of style superiority. There is no such thing, only you, yourself, and you again. Beware of any “master” promising you invincibility. It does not exist!

**
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:41 pm

Panther »

In Canna-sensei's original post here are some thoughts/observations:

1 & 7) On the street, BGs will always try to use surprise to their advantage. That doesn't mean they won't "interview" you, just that you won't see them coming until the interview has already been going on. You are being interviewed from afar as you walk down the street. (Not paying attention.

Talking on the cell-phone. Pre-occupied for some reason.) By the time you are face-to-face, the BG(s) already have a certain mindset about how the encounter is going to go down.

Fortunately, there are times where the BG(s) will confront you verbally hoping to deprive you of something only of monetary value and will verbally tell you what the desired object is (Give me your wallet!).

UNfortunately, there are the other times... times which for a man, could mean a 'sucker punch' and laying on the ground with the kicked in head and ribs, or for a woman, could mean being bundled into the back of a van to be whisked away to the secondary crime scene.

2, 3 & 5) BG(s) have an intimate understanding of a very important tactical advantage. It would behoove everyone to gain an understanding of that tactical advantage and ways to neutralize it.

You're asking what this mystical, magical thing is?

Simple. Disparity of Force You see, BG(s) know that they must have a greater force than their intended victim(s). If you're a smaller person, a woman, younger, then the BG assesses that and makes the decision whether or not (s)he can "take" you.

If you are larger than the BG, then (s)he must make a decision to leave you alone, get an "equalizer" (some weapon), or gain an advantage through numbers.

Only training one-on-one, or with others who are the same size/skill as yourself can easily lead to a delusional feeling which could be fatal "on the street".

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:43 pm

Panther

4) Some people become delusional about their capabilities to "withstand a blow" based on conditioning drills and sanchin checking. (Don't get me wrong, those are important aspects of Okinawan martial arts and I have engaged in them before and am engaging in those activities currently)

However, regardless of how well conditioned any "master" is, they would be lucky to even survive if a 290#, 6'2" Mongo was allowed to unload, full-power, full-force with a baseball bat (or 2X4) into the back of said "master's" head!

Forget even that for a minute... You know you can take some body shots. You're a die-hard Uechi practioner who has been through extensive and heavy sanchin checking for years, so you're going to block that head strike, but are confident that if you miss the body blow you "can take it"...

But as the BG's body blow makes contact, you realize that contained in his fist is a 4" long push-knife that has just ripped a gaping hole as it was withdrawn.

The best bet is to use the ultimate in blocking techniques... "don't be there".

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:45 pm

Panther

6, 8 & 10) On the street, BG(s) will have no qualms about hurting you to get what they want. The only thing that they understand is hurting.

If you can't gain the mindset to hurt another person, then your survival chances have dropped significantly... perhaps to zero.

A BG is in the confrontation to the end and you must be as well. Your goal must be survival regardless of what that means to the BG.

The BG made choices that created the situation and must take the personal responsibility (or liability) of the outcome of those choices.

If that means the BG meets the Reaper, so be it.

Your training and mindset must be prepared for that inevitability lest you or your loved ones are the ones that take the journey into the afterlife.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:47 pm

Panther

9) weapons, no matter what they are, are only as good as your training with them. So, get out of the dojo and walk around sometimes.

Take a walk into an alleyway, parking garage, anywhere and stop... think about what is available to use as a weapon. A stick? A cardboard box? A piece of wire, chain or rope? How about your belt? (not your obi, the one that's holding up your jeans...)

Do you have car keys in your pocket?

Once you identify what some of the potential weapons are... grab on and train with them! Sometime try training in your street clothes. Gee, that double, spinning, jumping, reverse super-kick doesn't work when you wear jeans that are so tight someone can count the change in your pocket from 10' away... Looked good in the dojo, but is impossible in those pants. Hmmmmm...

How fast can you get out that folder out? How much training have you had with the SIG P229?

I've seen lots of martial artists, especially women martial artists, who have a kubaton on their key-chain. You know what it is and I know what it is... Don't you think you just advertised to all the BGs who were sizing you up on the street?

Image Don't you think they just decided to get a weapon or get some extra BGs to help. Kind of negates any percieved advantage of having the damn thing, doesn't it...

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:50 pm

Panther

11, 12 & 13) Get out of the comfort zone, get into the mindset of survival. We all have reasons for being in a comfort zone at any given point.

I know I have mine... But if you've never been in a street confrontation before and have gotten into a comfort zone in the dojo, you aren't prepared.

Sorry if that's blunt, but it's just a fact. Think outside the boundaries of your latest kata or kumite... think survival no matter what.

14) Learn to deal with the sight of blood. Yours or the BGs makes no difference, deal with it. I still have scars that will always remind me of what color my blood flows...

I don't care who you are it is a disquieting thing to be helping out victims during the aftermath and have an EMT come up to you and tell you that you are the one that needs attention!

What?!? Me?!? I'm fine, help these other people!

Sir, look at yourself. You're covered with blood.

But it's not my blood.

Sir, come with me... it is your blood. You're hurt. It's amazing that you're standing.

I don't feel hurt. I feel fine! I just got a little blood on my shirt from someone else... Oops, I guess it is mine...

And we need to tend those head wounds too.

(Ever look into a mirror and have your eyes looking back through a sea of red? You learn to handle the sight of blood pretty quickly, or... I don't know, for me, there was no "or".)

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:51 pm

Panther

15) Everyone bleeds. Everyone hurts. Everyone dies.

So why go through all of that?

Because the most important thing you can do to keep yourself and your loved ones safe on the street is Live in condition Yellow! Be AWARE.

Trust your inner voice, your instincts... if things don't "feel right"... LEAVE that place. The ultimate blocking & safety technique... Don't be there.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:52 pm

One of the most fundamental differences between a dojo/ tournament “fight” and a street confrontation is that in the street you may suddenly find the back of your head as the target of a bludgeon from hell.

Then as you reel from the blow, assuming you have not lost consciousness, your wants of being a “great martial artist” in response, is stifled by the knowledge that your attacker is now in a position to massacre you as he pleases, because you are in the fog, and the more he massacres you, the more stunned you are, and the more stunned you are, the more he massacres you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:55 pm

In my opinion the advantage of a martial art is the it teaches techniques, each specific to the style. It will strengthen your body and it is conducive to agility and quick of reflexes.

But in my long years of experience, I have seen so many students learn nothing but “flash” i.e., maybe they can do eight katas to “perfection”,
Know, in the Japanese language, the names of all the toes of one’s foot,
Their kiais are a true danger to the crystal ware of their étagère, etc.

But to have seen some of them in street fights, they become stiff, and rigid, and at first faint by an attacker, they shoot 6oo techniques, all without timing and wide of the target, then settle in totally out of breath, and unable to even maintain their guard up.


Sobering...but as always...deniable...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:57 pm

Even having mastered good techniques of a system, I have realized that I would not be very effective in a street fight because I lack the “blood instinct.”

In other words, I don’t think, “ sure, you beat on me all you want, but in the end I will ravage you”!

If my adversary were to fall on the ground, it is not in me to disfigure his face or cave in his ribs with kicks. Like wise I would not be able to stomp him in between the legs to prevent him from getting up, for fear of rendering him sterile.

I know that the objective is to hit decisively and then run in order to survive, but this reluctance, this lack of “blood instinct”, will make my first defense response inadequate because of these psychological blocks.

This is the big difference between an average, law abiding, considerate martial artist, and a streetwise punk.
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