Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:00 pm

Panther »

You think your attacker gave a rat's @$$ about your well-being?!?! If you are fortunate enough to take the bastard down, then you should be knowledgeable enough to know that unless you do something about, he will get back up!

Don't want to make him sterile? Image FINE! At least don't leave him capable of coming after you!



SHEESH! You think that SOB attacking you really "doesn't want to hurt you"?!? If he didn't want to hurt you, he wouldn't have attacked you in the first damn place!!!

Ahem... sorry, I get a little emotional over this tuff sometimes...

Panther
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:08 pm

This type of introspection is necessary to get our feet back on the ground, every once in a while, and re-evaluate our training methods, instead of kneeling by our well worn obis and neatly folded gis, chanting mantras.



Remember this is a reality forum...so if this stuff bothers you...just turn the page and dream, you will feel better.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:10 pm

Gabriel Suarez »

True words. The biggest problem I see is that experience is what makes the difference. Experience is also something that few sane people want to develop.

I'm not claiming to be anything more than a student of the art, but I have been in a few fights here and there. I'm a classically trained guy, but in every fight I've been in, the thing that made the difference was being alert and seeing it coming, and secondly a few basic and easily applied techniques.

Training is essential, but similarly it is essential to know what you are training for.

A kickboxer who has the best and fastest roundkick in the world will still get his clock cleaned if he slips and falls on a wet sidewalk.

And the UFC champion grappler will still die when the buddy of the guy he's mounting shoots him in the back of the head with a stolen Lorcin pistol.

No one is invincible, and no one is the best fighter alive.

Learn, keep things simple, stay in shape, and stay alert.

Those are the best option.

------------------
Gabe Suarez
Suarez International, Inc.
Training in Weapons, Tactics, and Combatives
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:05 am

MetaBaron »

Death threats at work

Hello folks,
Need your opinion on an issue that seems to make its ugly head known more and more these days, which is violence in the work place.

This morning I was involved in an altercation over a trivial matter, and my co-worker, ended our argument with the words, **** with me, and I'll kill you." before storming off.

Nice huh?

Here is my official report, with names omitted. This may also give insight on what starts this kinds of issues:

Please let me know what you think:

At approx, XXXX am, on XXXXX, I arrived at the Data Center to begin my shift. XXXXXXX was at the terminal to the right most side of the Noc monitor desk.

At approx. XXXXXX am, XXXXX logged off the terminal. I then logged onto the terminal he was using with my user name and password of "XXX" and "XXX", which was originally set up by XXXXXXX on this machine, and I have used no other on this machine since.

Upon logging on, I observed that my profile setting, programs, and mail and browser setting had all been wiped clean from the settings that I had made, which forces me to spend anywhere from 30-45 minutes to reset them, and redownload all of the programs again.


This was to my knowledge, about the fifth time this has happened on this machine, in the last two weeks.

Upon realizing that all of my hard work was once again gone, I faced the monitor, (XXXX was behind me accross the room talking on the phone) and I exclaimed (facing the screen.) "****ing ****!" I then proceeded to ask XXXXXX in a calm voice, if he had touched my profile or had done something to the machine lat night. XXXX said, **** no, I did not touch your ****ing profile."


I then said, "XXXXX relieved me last night" did you work after her?" XXXXXX then said again, "Hey man! I didn't touch your ****ing profile!"

I then said in a calm voice, "Well if you were the only one working on this machine, then you must have done something or something must have happened to the machine. If the my profile was there last night, and now it is gone, then logically something must have changed on the machine."


XXXXXX then began to yell loudly at me, and he was also talking on the the phone to some unknown person. He began to yell "I am so ****ing tired right now, and I don't need this ****ing **** from you!"


He yelled further, "Look man, I didn't touch your ****ing profile!" You are always accusing me of touching your ****ing profile!" "You know what, I am so ****ing tired, and I don't need this ****, so you can ****** my mother ****ing dick!"


I then said to XXXXXX in a calm voice, "You know what man, there in no need for you to be talking to me like this."

XXXXXX then yelled back, "**** you! You're always bitching and complaining!" "Dude, you know what? You and your ****ing problems can ****** my mother ****ing dick! I am too tired for this bull****!"


I was in shock from his abusing words, and I was fearing for my safety, as his yelling was rapidly increasing in volume.


I then slowly stood up from across the room and I said slowly and calmly. "What did you just say to me?"

XXXXXX then began yelling again, He said "Why don't you go tell your ****ing problems to somebody else, I aint gonna take your ****ing abuse!"

I then slowly sat down, still facing him, and I remained silent.

XXXXXXX continued to yell, " I am so ****ing tired of your ****! If you **** with me, I'll KILL you!!"

I calmly said, (In shock) "you'll kill me...."

He said with a deadly serious face, looked me straight in the eyes and yelled: "That's right, YOU **** WITH ME, AND I'LL KILL YOU!!!!!

I then turned away from him, and calmly said. "I think we should terminate this conversation."

He then continued to yell at me, even as I was attempting to ignore him, he was saying" I'm too ****ing tired for this **** and your bitching, go bitch to someone else!

You're always ****ing accusing me, I'm so ****ing tired, I don't wanna hear your ****ing ****!!" "Just ****** my muther****ing dick!"


He then yelled into the phone, "I'm not gonna go back to jail for anyone, it's not worth it! I've already been there!"

He then slammed down the phone and stormed out of the side Noc exit, at approx XXXXX am

I then called XXXX(supervisor) on his cell phone, and left a message.
He then called me back about five minutes later, and I explained what had transpired.

Note: With respect to his claim that I am always accusing him, this was the first time I had ever asked him if he had changed something. Previously, I had thought that perhaps (XXXXX another employee) had changed something on the machine, as some of the changes coincided with his shift., but I have never outright accused anyone of anything other than
previously relayed my suspicions on the matter to XXXX and XXXXX.

At this point I am unsure of what XXXXX intends to do regarding his threat to kill me.

I seriously fear for my life at this time.
I hereby affirm that this statement is true to the best of my knowledge.
-XXXXXXX
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:07 am

Meta Baron>>

-Now, Here's where I think I went wrong.

I should not have said Anything..at all, but just brought my issues to my supervisor.
Also, standing up and saying "What did you just say to me?" was probably perceived as threatening to him, as I am 6'4. and he is 5'6, and he know I do budo.

I use this bluff sometimes to control situations, i.e., this was just postulating and body language.

Now, I am a pretty easy going guy, and the chemical cocktail has since worn off, so I can think rather clearly at this time.
Maybe the guy has had a hard week and I should not press the matter.
Maybe I was bitching too much.

I was thinking about diffusing the issue by offering an apology.

But did he cross the line by threatening to kill me?
This person never exhibited any animosity toward me in the past. The was totally out of left field.

Any thoughts?

Thank you,
Warm Regards,
~Meta
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:26 am

According to De Becker [gift of fear] a bona fide threat does not contain the word if .

The moment it does, it is nothing but intimidation, and not a threat.

A threat is a statement of an intention to do some harm, period, offering no conditions.

Thus, what the man said is more akin to high stakes manipulation than a real threat, according to the book.

The so called “threat” [with a condition_if] the man made is borne of the frustration emotion; proving that he failed to influence another’s thinking in another way, and most often, if not always, represents desperation not intention.

De Becker indicates that a threat is rarely spoken from a position of power, whatever power the threat accrues is derived from the fear instilled in the victim.

How one responds to the threat determines whether it will be just emotional words or something empowering the individual over the other.

Thus it is the listener and not the speaker who decides how powerful the threat will be.

If the listener turns pale, starts shaking, and asks for forgiveness, he has turned the threat of intimidation into gold.

Conversely, if he seems unaffected, it is thin.

Even in cases of a bona fide threat [without conditions] it is recommended to never show concern or fear, or a high appraisal of his words. I believe that Meta acted wisely in responding the way he did.

The man is much smaller than Meta, he is obviously afraid, as evidenced by his “disclosure” of being an ex con, which carries more intimidation. He might well be bluffing. Does your employer, Meta, hire ex cons?

Although you may not be at risk, Meta, uncertainty about the person/risk causes alarm and possibly problems.

I would not call the police or even report him to management, because that might escalate whatever might be underlying.

I would get him aside a few days later, and in a friendly tone, tell him that I did not appreciate him making threats to my life, and if this behavior continued it would give me no choice but to report him.

I know of situations where the man apologized in gratitude for having been given a way out of trouble in this manner.
Yet, there could be cause for concern, as violence in the workplace is rampant today, more so to be on the alert in the coming fears of layoffs.

Buy the book the Gift of fear and read the section on workplace violence and pre-incidents indicators.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 7:35 am

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:07 pm

Another great tool of the Sabaki Method is the manner in which the back fist strike is taught.

Sharp strike v. power strike:
Make sure to snap the wrist so that the top knuckles of the backhand can strike down and through the target. The snapping action creates the velocity for high impact without pushing the object.

Ninomya sensei also indicates that a back fist strike with the snapping penetrating knuckles down and through the target is also very effective to the ribs as a short-range counterattack.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:09 pm

kusanku »

Van, et al.-

The Sabaki method of Joko Ninomiya, derived from the enshin Karate of Ashihara sensei, itself derived from Mas Oyama's Kyokushin Kai karate, is indeed known among those who trained in contact kumite as one of the world's most effective training systems.

I too saw that Sabaki challenge, may have that tape yet, it was amazing.

The concept are indeed adaptable to all realistic fighting systems.The tai sabaki concept is absolutely essential in that close and hitting and kicking that hard.

The throws come right off the turns and the strikes are instant to counter, when this is used.

Very powerful and fluid system indeed.

Regards, John
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:10 pm

david »

I have to agree that the Sabaki Challenge is pretty formidable and not for the faint hearted.

Ashihara's books show powerful straightforward techniques.

Reading them won't help though... Image You have to train and spar to develop the requisite sense of timing, distancing and movement.

The spirit is forged in the ring by the onslaught of the opponent's attacks.

david
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:15 pm

At Gary Khoury's dojo, I had the pleasure to meet Mr. Yuji Iwakura of Japan, the Sabaki Challenge world heavyweight-fighting champion. He had been teaching at Gary’s dojo on Saturdays, but unfortunately, he and his wife are moving shortly.

Very impressive and very friendly.

I also finished reviewing the videotape on the Sabaki method, which Mr. Iwakura had left for Gary.

I had seen the first world Sabaki Challenge on TV in 1996, and I was stunned by the ferocity of it with takedowns and knockouts galore.

Basically you fight a full contact match with kicks to the face allowed full power. No punches to the face are permitted for the safety of the fighters.

One hand grabs are encouraged for takedowns and control of the opponent as full power blows are delivered to the body.

The fighters wear no protective equipment and therefore must be conditioned to the extreme as they are subject to terrible blows in the legs as well by shin kicks that would take a wall down.

The video shows Master Ninomya break baseball bats, one held on top of another by students, with his shin, but most impressive was his breaking of three blocks of ice with a tremendous shin kick. Just about the most unbelievable break I have ever seen in my life.

This is a no point fighting system. You win by making the fighter wince and turn away from you under a heavy blow, or by knockout. A well-conditioned fighter will often hold his ground and take a solid hit just to get a chance at giving it back at close range hoping his shot will be more effective.

The kicking and punching power of these practitioners is simply awesome.

Tai Sabaki actually means turning, and using an opponent’s power and momentum against him, the system is predicated upon the Sabaki circle encouraging rotational movements outside the line of attack and turning the opponent into a counterstrike using his own weight and momentum against him for a more devastating blow launched from blind spot positioning.

It is the closest to a real street fight I have seen in sparring format, and the system is graceful as it is awesome due to the power of the circle. The techniques would complement the Uechi arsenal very well.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:28 pm

In his book, master Ninomya writes that full contact without pads or gloves, requires a blend of technique, power, and spirit that is unmatched in non-contact point system competition.

After watching the Sabaki challenge tournament in Denver I must agree. Those fighters are a special breed.

Master Ninomya apparently changed the original style to a circular system and he writes that by using the fighting circle in the Sabaki challenge, he hopes to introduce more fighters of all styles to the power of the circle, which encourages rotational movements outside the line of attack.

To me it looks like an awesome principle, and watching the tape, the body mechanics of circling the opponent and turning him into a slamming shot coming around at him the opposite way, are very sobering. And these fighters use gross motor movements that are devastating.


At Gary sensei’s dojo I also met Beth, Mr. Iwakura’s wife, who is familiar with this website. She is also a practitioner and is featured in the book. Hopefully either she or some other Sabaki players will get wind of this discussion and jump in.

This system has really caught my interest.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:30 pm

Jake Steinmann »

Mark Tripp, the moderator of the Judo Q&A over at mixedmartialarts.com once wrote that the Sabaki method was the only karate book he'd ever reccomend to a MMA fighter.

I've seen bits of the Sabaki challenge, and those guys are tough! If I recall correctly, there were a number of Muay Thai and Sanshou fighters participating as well. I believe Cung Le may have even entered at one point.

The sabaki stuff certainly requires greater fortitude than games of tag present at most martial arts tourneys.

------------------
Jake Steinmann
PDR Team
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:38 pm

And then there is real violence...

when violence comes

By Diedtra Henderson, Globe Correspondent

SEATTLE - The man was encircled by his attackers. They punched and kicked, they slammed and slugged. Each time the 21-year-old broke free, the thugs knocked him down and the pummeling began anew.

A gunshot, and screaming police sirens, scattered onlookers.

The nation is familiar with the violent video footage from Seattle's Mardi Gras melee, but this attack was different.

It happened days later, and miles away, from the disturbances in Pioneer Square. This victim was brutalized at a private party that had been crashed by young toughs whom no one knew, according to the Seattle police report.

A ritual of violence now routinely mars Seattle gatherings, so much so that some officers have dubbed the city's annual Torchlight Parade, a highlight of annual Seafair activities, and the Bite of Seattle, where the city's restaurants showcase offerings, the ''Torchfight Parade'' and the ''Fight of Seattle.''

As the year began, as smoke from fireworks drifted, and as the crowds leaving Seattle Center languished in gridlock, Private First Class Patrick Franz was beaten to death after wishing his attackers a ''Happy New Year.''


The Seattle Weekly was even less generous. The paper's cover image featured a man, corn-rowed and unconscious, his eyes weeping blood, not tears.

''After the vicious young thugs who terrorized Fat Tuesday themselves, the person who came out of his atrocity with the most blood on his hands is the mayor,'' said another columnist, Geov Parrish.
**

How would you have survived it?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 6:28 pm

DEFENDING THE SHOOT

Joe Pomfret here.

I have been reading a lot of everybody's theorys on what makes a good shoot effective and how to defend against one. Much of what I have read needs to be corrected.

A solid "shoot" for a double leg or single leg takedown is NOT a football or "rhino" style technique. If that's the way it looks it is because the practitioner is executing incorrectly.

Important elements of this technique (as I state in my video) is changing levels, or bending of the knees-not the bending of the back, timing, and distancing.


As you lurch towards your opponent, your back should still be straight and your head up. Your head is aimed at the center of your opponent's hips and your forward knee lands between his feet (watch my fight again).

People are discussing the realism of fighting...that's awesome. I feel as if a major portion of these same people are convincing, and affirming, to each other of what to do in the face of real fighting dangers.

There is NO way practitioners will know how it works, or what to do in the face of it, without getting out there and practicing it. Speak from experience.

Theory is important, but it can't be all that your testimony is based upon.

Uechi Ryu is my primary style and that will never change.

But, a solid double leg will not be defended by a party with one hand and his\her feet remaining in a stationary position.

Hey, I teach it out of Dan Kumite too. What else am I supposed to do, create "Joe P. Ryu?"

I know I will NEVER use it in a real situation. I'm sorry...it's the truth.

TRose and his students will be visiting my dojo next week to explore the world of submission groundfighting.

What are you doing this Saturday?

Joe Pomfret
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