Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:50 am

One of the most formidable fighters of all times was Taro Tanaka, Japan's collegiate champion, hailing from Master Tada's dojo.

Taro must have been just about five feet tall,130 pounds or so, but a true Kamikaze fighter in body and spirit.

And I do believe he had the "small man" complex, because he would fight you viciously at the drop of a hat.

You would have be careful in laughing around him, lest he thought he'd be the target of it.

He was more dangerous than a man twice his size because of the viciousness of his intent upon engaging.

And Taro was a street fighter, according to his friend, Moto Yamakura, also collegiate champion, who came with him to the Mattson Academy for a long visit.

Apparently Taro loved to get into street fights in japan.

I was running the free fighting class in Boston for George in those days...Taro showed contempt for anyone who would not get on the floor and fight him...

Both of them would practice 1000 kicks a day.

At the All American in New York, 1968, Taro fought the semifinals against Joe Lewis...Moto the quarter finals against Chuck Norris.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 13, 2018 1:45 pm

Going in with old power vs. power, is another story. For in that game, the more powerful individual with win. All other skills being equal.


In my view,usually the more powerful/stronger/tougher individual, will win even if less skilled than the opponent.

Such a person will most of the times smother and overwhelm, cutting through the skills of the opponent like a knife through butter.

Again take a look at the power team and you will see what I mean.

Don't make assumptions about your skills or you'll get your ticket punched early on.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 13, 2018 11:16 pm

The human gene pool [ a virus on this earth]

(The late) John Pernicky and his friend, (the late) Sal Hawkins, of the great state of Washington, decided to attend a local Metallica concert at the George Washington amphitheater. Having no tickets (but having had 18 beers between them), they thought it would be easy to "hop" over the nine foot fence and sneak into the show.

They pulled their pickup truck over to the fence and the plan was for Mr. Pernicky, who was 100 pounds heavier than Mr. Hawkins) to hop the fence and then assist his friend over.

Unfortunately for (the late) Mr. Pernicky, there was a 30-foot drop on the other side of the fence. Having heaved himself over, he found himself crashing through a tree.

His fall was abruptly halted (and broken, along with his arm) by a large branch that snagged him by his shorts. Dangling from the tree with a broken arm, he looked down and saw some bushes below him.

Possibly figuring the bushes would break his fall, he removed his pocket knife and proceeded to cut away his shorts to free himself from the tree. Finally free, Mr. Pernicky crashed into holly bushes.

The sharp leaves scratched his ENTIRE body and now, without the protection of his shorts, a holly branch penetrated his rectum. To make matters worse, on landing his pocket knife penetrated his thigh.

Mr. Hawkins, seeing his friend in considerable pain and agony, threw him a rope and tried to pull him to safety by tying the rope to the pickup truck and slowly driving away.

However, in his drunken haste/state, he put the truck into reverse and crashed through the fence landing on his friend and killing him.

Police arrived to find the crashed pickup with its driver thrown 100 feet from the truck and dead at the scene from massive internal injuries.

Upon moving the truck, they found John under it half-naked, scratches on his body, a holly stick in his rectum, a knife in his thigh, and his shorts dangling from a tree branch 25 feet in the air.


Congratulations gentlemen, you win...

Now and then we have seen couple such donkeys on these forums_
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:37 pm

Telegraphing

Every good puncher I have ever seen being really effective, puts his whole body into it (even your toes should be pushing in a good punch: this is one of the ways Sanchin mechanics is taught.


Watch the best boxers: How they hit with their body weight uncorking [Mike Tyson comes to mind]__

Why didn’t the opponent, going down to the canvass, read or avoid the shot? And boxers are better at punching and reading telegraph, than any of us wannabies.


Rotating the hips into the hook also adds great
mass from the lower body into it (much like all good boxers do and good karateka learn too).

So if the boxers would be telegraphing, why is it that their trainers keep teaching them that concept, and more importantly, why do the opponents keep going down to the canvass?

The very strong, effective fighters with a record of knockouts or “stopping power” shots function along the momentum concept. The same goes for karate fighters, at least the best I have seen in the ring over the long years [some contemporary examples are Gary Khoury, Bob Spoon, and Roy Bedard, __ watch their bodies as they hit]

Physics dictates that momentum is the primary force behind the impact. the momentum is produced by force over time. Body motion provides much of the force to accelerate the
hand, and more force for the arm muscles to push against.

Some will telegraph less, some more, but at close range it doesn’t make a hell of a lot of difference, because the opponent has to overcome his reaction lag.

You are also telegraphing when you just raise your fist on the way to the target. Why aren’t we concerned about that?

Remember the movie Billy Jack? He stood nose to nose with the sheriff and told him he was going to hook kick him to the head-
And there is nothing you will be able to do about it.


Why did the sheriff get knocked out by the kick he knew was coming?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:41 pm

In a fast and furious nose-to-nose street fight [not a sporting match] both you and the opponent will be operating in a “blur” of motion with “tunnel vision” to boot.

He won’t see much of “over-rotating” telegraph, and even if he does, there won’t much he can do about it.

If you train the concept skillfully, what the opponent will have to deal with is like some one cracking a whip __then “a truck coming @ you motion”

Cracking a whip has much telegraph to it. But try dealing with it. We must also train in slicing/overpowering through an opponent’s “read” defense and counter. That’s what real fighting is about.


Also the body acts as a buffer/ stabilizer platform for the punch. Adding the
body in__ is adding mass to
the punch and preventing the body from bouncing off
the target and thereby losing force.

This is further achieved by the “kime” effect at impact point.

Let’s remember that your opponent does not stand still like a dummy__ he is moving at you fast and furious.

Also some karate students are lightweights with skinny bodies and arms and no mass in their shoulders.

Thus they will not be able to generate much force without body action, they only think they do.

Then watch them in armor scenario drills__ you will see “chicken wings flapping in the wind” __

Ask Alan Lowell to describe the useless flail he has seen in the Kipp’s bullet men scenarios.

There __is where we learn our lesson on how best to use our bodies up close and personal, not when we are punching air.

Go up against a bulletman and you will find out how good you really are, physically and mentally...after getting a taste of the chemical cocktail, and while gassing out.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:43 pm

Harvey »

Any movements can be telegraphed. And someone who says "watch me while I turn and compress and expand my body" will, of course, be giving too much away.

But in fact, I think, t.c. body mechanics done properly are the opposite of telegraphing.

The first two stages of the rocket (lower body/hips through the dantien) have already fired by the time the third stage (strike) is visible.

And there is no way to explode without torque and compression. This is the basic principle of t'ai chi, as well.

Calvin Chin says he teaches fajing only to the most advanced t'ai chi students, because students who have not developed structural integrity and summation of components (the t.c. principles of tucking and twisting and compressing) try to use brute force to explode and end up hurting themselves.

That danger exists, even for advanced students, in t.c. karate classes.

And if some of us telegraph, it is not because the t.c. principles are flawed, but because we have not yet reached an acceptable level of performance.

The test is not to look at any student who happens to be in a t.c. class, but to stand in front of someone who has mastered the principles (Van, Arthur, and others) and block his attack.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:48 pm

Alan Lowell wrote:
1. Seasoned martial artist not able to see/block big haymakers thrown by the bulletman.


Let’s think about this for a moment. Ever wonder why that is?

Why do your blocks seem to work so well in the dojo against straight punches but under the stress of a bulletman swinging a haymaker [not even a real fight] karate people don't see it coming and don't block it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:49 pm

TSDguy »

I suspect this isn't the main cause, but perhaps a contributing factor. It has always bugged me.

Most schools don't practice against 'sloppy' attacks.

Haymakers, tackles (not take-downs), on occassion even groin attacks are ignored.

You may get real pretty at blocking a single straight punch, but furious punches from all angles are discouraged and not practiced.

At my black belt test. I was wailing on a guy from every angle, way inside his kicking range.

He was helpess. One judge told me to back off him and use some technique. I was winning handily!
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:51 pm

LeeDarrow » 02 Dec 2001 19:09

Van Canna-Sensei,

Several reasons come to mind in this example:

1) The Sheriff didn't believe that such a thing was possible. Result - cold-cocked.

2) Speed and range - relatively fast kick (by the standards of the day) and the range seemed to preclude such a kick's effectiveness in the mind of the Sheriff.

3) The writers were on Tom Loughlin's side!

4) There was very little wind up to the kick, which gave the Sheriff very little time to react in any case.

The kick in this instance was literally a sucker punch. Loughlin set the scene to show just how powerful the idea of an impossibility can be in stopping someone from responding to an attack.

The Sheriff was standing square on to Loughlin, knees locked and at rather close range. To the western mind in that period, the ability to move a foot through such an arc was just not in the mindset. Period.

Surprise is a VERY potent weapon and one which many of us need to remember when faced with an impending attack, IMHO.

Sometimes cold cocking the biggest guy in a group, with one or two FAST moves will make the rest of the batch think twice about continuing the attack.

While this is a little off topic for this thread - it's just my 2 cent's worth based on your question.

Respectfully,

Lee Darrow, C.Ht.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:54 pm

david »

Good point, Candan. Throw a hook at a martial artist (especially Japanese styles). A surprising number will get in. Most are prepped against a straight punch.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:23 pm

AlanL »

Van Sensei,

No talk of telegraphing strikes. As a matter of fact the practice of the 4 striking techniques are taught with exaggerated length of stroke and hip movement.

Power delivery is king. The exaggerated stroke and hip movement will naturally shorten during the stress of attack.

Here is what I have observed during full charge bulletman attacks.

Cons

1. Seasoned martial artist not able to see/block big haymakers thrown by the bulletman.

2. Momentary freeze-up and/or overcome with fear.

3. Flailing weak technique – fight goes on too long because they couldn’t take out the bulletman with power shots.

4. Inability to fire the most basic block or strike during the initial rush attack.

5. Holding of breath

Pro

1. Turning the fear into the ability to hit with explosive power.

2. Overcoming fear and confidence of survival.

3. Realizations that fancy complicated techniques just won’t work.

4. Understanding the spectrum of self-defense and defeat.

5. Imprinting of success and successful techniques while adrenalized.

6. Exhale/yell while striking.

Bill Kipp always talks about being explosive in your attack. He yelled out to me right before I was attacked “be a volcano”.

Remember that 30 seconds would be a long attack. Not a sparring match for 2-3 minutes.

I did have a chance to discuss your TC method with Bill and he was extremely interested. Your mindset falls right in line with Bill’s FAST Defense. I’ll say it again power is king. You may only get to land a couple of shots. They need to have stopping power.

This is the most eye opening, denial-destroying training I’ve ever had.

I really looked into my Uechi arsenal for the few sweet techniques that I can deliver with the type of power required to survive.

Alan Lowell
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:31 pm

AlanL »

Van Sensei,

Here is some material from Bill's web site. I think it answers your question.

Information from www.fastdefense.com

Do you remember the last time that guy got in your face? The loud mouth who threatened you? The guy who cut you off? The jerk who had nothing better to do than ruin your day? Do you remember how you felt?

Think back...
Remember how your body felt hot and flushed all at the same time. Your stomach quivered. Your breathing shortened. Your muscles tightened. Maybe your hands were shaking.

When is was all over you had this terrible feeling that all the years of training you have had, might not have helped you. Would you have choked up? Froze? Or...just been too tense and tight to execute your techniques!

You were feeling the effects of the Adrenaline dump!

Guess what? It is totally natural and regardless of your experience it is going to happen. It is nature's way of preparing you for the fight or flight experience.

Take a look at the facts. When adrenalized blood rushes to your arms and legs preparing them to be as strong as they can be for the fight (or flight).

The problem is some of the blood that normally is feeding your brain is no longer there to support your cognitive (thinking) brain.

What is left is what is sometimes called the "frog brain", a primitive and totally reactive brain that does not have much access to all of your training and techniques.

You develop "tunnel vision", auditory exclusion (you don't hear much) and worst of all you lose fine motor co-ordination and manual dexterity.
So what can we do about all this?

The answer is Adrenal Stress Response Conditioning!


The President of the International Adrenal Stress Response Association, Bill Kipp, has been training in the area of Adrenal Stress Response for over 13 years. He has traveled the world working with martial arts schools and their instructors, teaching them how to effectively deal with the adrenal dump and even use it to their advantage.

One of the important things that have been discovered working with thousands of students and martial artists over the years is an interesting fact. And that is, what you learn and practice, while adrenalized, is what you will have available when you really need it.

Surprisingly, even if you have consciously forgotten your training experiences while adrenalized, they will be available to you when you get the adrenaline dump in a real fight!

This is of key importance. You probably have heard stories of very experienced black belts being easily defeated in a real fight. You might be surprised to know that they never even threw a kick or used anything that even resembled a martial arts technique.

If you have been training for a while you might feel that "hey, that wouldn't be me". Maybe you're right, but you would be bucking the odds. You see when you are severely threatened or attacked your body will react by dumping huge amounts of adrenaline into your bloodstream.

As we said earlier you may not have access to your cognitive thinking or worse yet, your drilled in martial arts techniques! Unless, of course, you practiced them under the duress of adrenaline stress response training.

Q: What if I train in the Martial Arts?

A: The Martial Arts are a wonderful path of discipline and physical dexterity. But in truth many a Black Belt has gotten beaten in street fights because they were not prepared to deal with the intense bio-chemical and emotional response of a real life attack. Fancy fine motor skills go right out the window when suddenly someone is in your face yelling and threatening to do serious bodily harm.

Q: Does this mean that the martial arts are worthless?

A: Absolutely not. Studying a Martial Art is a powerful journey. Think of FAST Defense as the missing link to Martial Arts training. Initially there is a transition period while Martial Artists adjust to the adrenal rush.

Once they get through this adjustment, they do very well under duress. But the myth of looking like a movie star in a real fight has to be left behind as the fantasy that it is. Real life fights are messy and scary and people get hurt.



Alan Lowell
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:28 pm

Footwork

Laird

I was expounding upon the rationale of keeping one's tool box small strong and familiar the other day (about 2 weeks ago). My training partner asked me what my favorite/strongest moves were.

I thought for a while and told him targeting the neck ,right hand, front kick, going down the middle. He smiled and said not even close.

I was rather taken back and pressed him further. He said that s**t kicks A$$ but it's those little #&%$ing steps you take before you deliver that stuff that F&#$ me up.

The conversation kind of opened my eyes a bit.

I. My French friend swears really well in English. Image(then again no one swears well in French)

2. I never realized how much movement enhanced the way I fight.

I constantly try to move in with little sliding steps or with slightly off center steps.

I never realized before but most of my techniques work because my movement closes distances and changes angles.

Kind of earth shattering to find out the Best thing in the old tool box is not the power but the ability to shuffle the feet.

Course you can move set down and deliver!

Point is movement creates opportunities, no movement creates targets.

And moving backwards maybe creating opportunities for you attacker.

food for thought

Laird
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:49 pm

Movement is king...period.

Watch a boxer.

We talk of so many things...having a bigger hammer...faster ...etc. All good...until your opponent ends up being a linebacker...or someone or more than one [usually the case in street fights] that come close to a linebacker...

It is then you will find out that your such formidable powerful strikes turn out to be useless and they/he are about to bury you.

There'll be friends lined up at you grave with a sanchin salute...

Get you ass moving on those donkey feet of yours. Study the science of angling the enemy.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Mar 15, 2018 6:42 am

What is realistic self-defense?

Uechij »

“___________,” only teaches realistic self-defense skills.”

What in the hell does that mean? We know the onset of adrenalin dissipates fine motor skills, clouds the psyche, etc., but if you are able to execute a technique during a confrontation, no matter how complex while under the chemical cocktail, and it works successfully, then isn’t that realistic?

Who or what sets this definition of realistic and decides what techniques are deemed functional or not? Should how the average person reacts to an altercation dictate the way we think about our own abilities and tailor our training?

Couldn’t this mindset be the proverbial “double edged sword,” that could limit our acquisition of skills, and feed our fears adding to the cocktail, ultimately sabotaging the very essence of what we train for?
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