Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 6:01 am

Question

Also, some experts write that when executing a powerful thrust, whether
with
> the limb only or with the body behind it, a horizontal load is created[
> similar to a vertical load, as lifting a weight] which, if not relieved by
> breathing out, it can lead to ballooning and bursting of arteries,
> especially in older people__


**

Answer

Absolutely correct. Also, the "trapped" air and increased pressure in the lungs can rupture the little air sacks the sponge-like lung is filled with --
leading to decreased lung capacity as these sacs slowly accumulate scar tissue.


**

Scott Sonnon
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 6:03 am

Firstly, exhale through your maneuvers. Typically most (if not all) athletes inhale before and hold their breath throughout a maneuver, thus dramatically reducing the quality of their movement.

The optimal performance zone is at the cessation of exhalation. You cannot hold your breath, nor inhale, and shout simultaneously.

Remember the optimal performance zone is at the cessation of exhalation
Scott Sonnon


**

Coordinate breathing and synchronize it with your muscular activity. When you extend your arm, exhale and strike but conserve 50% of your air.

Be sure never to expel all of your air at one time. When you inhale, your body becomes light. When you exhale your body becomes rooted to the ground.



Listen to your breathing and become aware of every part of your body.
There must be a constant but pliable muscular contraction in the deltoid, trapezius, latissimus dorsi, serratus, and pectoral muscle groups.

Exhaling on the stroke, makes your impact more solid, creates a hard wall in your body in case you catch a counterblow, and it gets rid of carbon dioxide.



Focusing on the exhale is the best way to give commitment to your actions from a mental viewpoint.

By properly exhaling during a strike your are constricting your lungs, thereby causing more power with a wider range of movement capability.

You are controlling the adrenaline built up in your body to be released with greater exertion while exhaling, versus keeping it pent up inside during inhalation.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 6:15 am

When it is all said and done on breathing, one thing becomes very apparent.

There are very few teachers who can master the teaching of breathing, because their only experience with it is in relation with the demands of kata/kumite on the dojo floor that does not involve the sympathetic nervous system [SNS]_

Even the “sporting aspect” i.e., tournament fighting, is nothing but an agonistic structure with a “breathing preparation” much different than what you will encounter in a real street fight when your breathing rhythm will be under the dominion of your cardiac beat and your SNS.

Take the majority of Uechi practitioners, watch them breathe and “teach breathing” on the floor, then put them through a “fast defense” scenario and watch them breathe.

Alan Lowell has covered this before after his experience hands on with the bulletmen adrenaline spewing drills...none of us have done but think we know exactly how we will function in a street attack.

And one of these days we shall witness some older person collapse on the floor while doing his Dan test kata...his face lobster red...

Mother Nature will always give the best explanation of breathing when you least expect it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 6:17 am

When the adrenal stress response occurs:
* You loose fine motor control (fancy self-defense moves will not work).
* You experience tunnel vision, auditory exclusion, and denial.
* You will shake, experience shallow breathing and rapid heart rate.
* You will only remember about 5 "bits" of information. We have found that the more complicated and technical the self-defense technique, the less likely it is to work in a real life situation.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 1:24 pm

Trap, buck, and roll

Pomfret, Joe »

It seems like the grappling forum is in hibernation, so I will post here.

This is Van Canna's Self Defense Realities, and the reality is that you may be taken, or fall, to the ground during a fight.

When you are mounted and being punched in the face, what do you do?

Let's hear some ideas from everyone; it'll just take e second of your time.

PS. Pokes and pinches to an enraged opponent pumped up on adrenaline or more may not have the desired effect. :wink:

Joe P.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 1:31 pm

Pomfret, Joe »

If I'm on top of you, and you strike upwards, it is unbelievably difficult to generate power. All of your strength will be coming from your arms.

When you hit me, that may give me the idea to hit you back. Remember, I'm on top.

I not only have gravity on my side, I also have the ability to generate a lot of torque because I am not sandwiched between the ground and a bad guy like you are.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 1:33 pm

f.Channell »

Joe,
First I would fight tooth and nails not to let them get that position.
I would try to wrap my legs around them first.

If in that position I would reach up grab their head and pull them down tight to take away the distance or wrap their arms.

Then bridge violently from side to side to try to get them off.

I might try to lay a choke on them to "distract" them from the punches.

Depends on the clothing, some people ignore chokes, others focus on them and getting your hands off their neck.

I think practicing getting taken down and getting them in the guard is most important.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 1:44 pm

Pomfret, Joe »

That's right, keep him close. The more space he has, the more power he generates when he hits you.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 1:48 pm

Pomfret, Joe »

Remember, none of us want to go down. I don't, and I'm supposed to be good at this stuff. Too many bad things can happen down there, and this is exactly why we need to know what to do.

The situation is from the bottom of the mounted position, not the struggle on the way there.

We are on the bottom, he is completely on top.

I have been hearing a lot about the violent movement of the hips from people. What do you all mean? Moving the hips with strong sudden movements very well may not be enough.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 1:50 pm

f.Channell »

Joe,
Depending on the clothing either a collar choke or maybe a cupped hand behind the neck or hair, and a shoken or hiraken drilling in to the front of the throat.

The bridging being done towards the outside of the shoulders with a powerful hand movement of some type to assist and toss the bad guy off.
The bridge during the choke might help as well.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 5:02 pm

RACastanet »

How did I get the elbow to break?

The arm wrap is just above the elbow.

As the attacker is rolled off (as a clarification, if my right arm has wrapped the left arm, I would want to use my free left hand to apply a blow, push or some other pleasent softening technique to the attackers right shoulder, face, whatever to assist the bucking motion in the desired direction) and I get up onto a knee or standing position, I'd let my right arm slide over the elbow towards the wrist.

My left hand is now at the wrist positioning the attackers palm and elbow to face away from me (if it does not already).

From the kneeling position I can pull the wrist towards my body while thusting my hips into the elbow. If standing, I'd slip my foot under the shoulder and use my shin/knee/thigh to generate the hyperextension of the elbow as I pulled up and back on the wrist. In either case, my right arm is securely wrapped on the elbow or slightly towards the wrist. The tap outs come really quick in practice.

This sounds complicated but it happens very fast. If the attacker senses what is happening and yields there might be time to stop before the joint is damaged. If the attacker is thrashing, or grabbing for something important to distract you, let 'er rip!

Yes Joe, I'm well into the green belt and brown belt syllabus for MCMAP which includes the above grappling techniques.

We have taken a month off from individual training because of bad weather and the need to train a slew of new Lts and instructors getting ready to head out into the fleet.

Hopefully I'll resume my weekly trips to Quantico next week. I'd love to get the green belt certification before July. Could get to brown belt by the end of the year but that is very optimistic.

By the way, my current emoticon is the official MACE (Martial arts Center of Excellence) emblem. Boy would I love to get one of their training blouses with the emblem.

Regards, Rich

Member of the world's premier gun club, the USMC!

RACastanet
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 5:19 pm

Sorry to have to disappoint, but strictly arm thrusting, except for a few selected moves, will make your “beefy” opponent mad, and you will pay dearly for your mistake.

If you cannot launch a stopping strike, then don’t raise your hands in self defense at all, because you will be digging your own grave, not only by pissing the opponent off but by giving him the “right” to stomp out your eyeballs.

Also, you will know that you do not possess “street stopping power” and you will not “launch” out of fear of making things worse for yourself..If you don’t believe anything, believe this.

This is no criticism of anything written here, just general observations.

You may think you have the power and skill to deal with an attack...and the 'confidence' is surely a must...but we must be wary of the false self confidence that creeps into the human psyche.

The examples I have given you of my cases where 'champion' martial artists were killed in horrible ways...must be kept in the back of your mind in any encounter.

It all comes down to the type of opponent you come up against...and your cognitive bias rearing its ugly head.

A cognitive bias is a systematic pattern of deviation from norm or rationality in judgment.[1] Individuals create their own "subjective social reality" from their perception of the input.

An individual's construction of social reality, not the objective input, may dictate their behavior in the social world.[2] Thus, cognitive biases may sometimes lead to perceptual distortion, inaccurate judgment, illogical interpretation, or what is broadly called irrationality.


And here the problem is that under the extreme stress of trying to stay alive...your rational mind downshifts into much lower gears.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 5:28 pm

most people commonly assume that confident people have a hard time admitting they were wrong. Thus, if you can push them into saying something that is trivially wrong, the false confident person will defend it unnecessarily while the true confident person will cheerfully admit a mistake and move on.


The other real killer in self preservation is narcissism.

http://tinyurl.com/y9564kup

We have seen some sad examples of this here on my forum in years past.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 11:13 pm

Something else to be wary of= fatigue

There is also the fatigue factor involved here. People who are not used to try and “wiggle” free of a dead weight on their chest, while taking some vicious pummeling to the head- sandwiched between the floor and the knuckles, have no idea how quickly they will exhaust physically and mentally.

And then there is the 'getting hit' factor...

You will bleed/be in pain/dazed/or out cold...as the punches keep on raining down...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 20, 2018 11:14 pm

RACastanet »

One more note on the break... if the attacker's palm is down when you trap, buck, and roll the opponent off, you may get the wrist/elbow break or dislocation right there.

When we practice this move we stop after the wrap, before the buck and roll, to be certain the training partner has the palm up before finishing the move.

Rich
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