Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:47 pm

10. Ignorance of the Rules of Engagement
What you don't know can hurt you.
Ignorance of the use-of-force rules of
engagement (ROE) is no different.

Nearly every case I consult on involves
a normally law-abiding person who
genuinely believes they acted in lawful
self-defense, but who stands credibly
charged with a felony because they
violated one of the five legal elements
of self-defense.

The sad part is that
they didn’t do so out of malice, but out
of simple ignorance—they didn’t know
where the legal boundaries were, and
they stepped over them without ever
realizing they were doing so.

Well, at
least not until they found themselves charged.

The good news is that the law of self-defense need not be as complicated as the
legalistic language of statutes, court decisions and jury instructions can make it
seem. In fact, there are only five elements of a self-defense claim, just like there
are only four rules of gun safety.

The law of self-defense is not rocket science—
but it does have to be approached in a deliberate and well-organized manner, a
process that is enormously facilitated if there’s someone on hand who can
translate all that legalese into plain-English.

That’s our goal at lawofselfdefense.com: To translate the law of self-defense
into plain English so that it is both understandable and actionable for the law abiding
armed citizen.

Our mission is to help you avoid violating the law of self
defense by accident or ignorance, and thus avoid incurring legal risk when you
shouldn’t, but also to help you know when it’s time to defend yourself and your
family decisively, because you know that the legal conditions for use of force
have been met.


Law of Self Defense, LLC is an educational and legal consulting enterprise
focusing exclusively on American use-of-force law, and is led by Attorney Andrew
Branca, an internationally recognized subject-matter
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 12, 2018 4:02 pm

Understand that any fight involves a
greater-than-zero risk of death and a
greater-than-zero risk of going to jail
for much of the rest of your life.
Andrew Branca
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 12, 2018 4:16 pm

Condition yellow

Condition yellow is a skill that should naturally flow from your training.

The people who don't understand this concept [usually taught] by Lethal force trainers and military...think it is hyper vigilance or downright paranoia.

If you feel this way, then think of your state of mind behind the wheel of your car...that is condition yellow...and certainly not hyper vigilance or paranoia.

If you don't know the difference then do take a course with the Lethal Force Institute and get an education.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 12, 2018 4:21 pm

Panther>>

First, the phrase "living in Condition Yellow" (the self-defense mode terminology adopted by those such as Farnam, Ayoob and Cooper) doesn't equate to hypervigilance.

It better equates to "living with awareness" (the same condition of living espoused by a Theraveda Buddhist monk I studied with for awhile).

That isn't a "bad" way to live. It doesn't mean "being on guard 24/7" at all.

As I understand and try to practice the concept it means that I am attentive to the world around me.

As hard as it may be for some to believe, living like that has a multitude of benefits that have nothing at all to do with self-defense.

I walk through the woods near my house and because I'm attentive to the world around me I notice the deer standing perfectly still through the trees 25 yards away. I notice the subtle shift in the breeze on my cheek as I walk.

I notice the fisher-cat perched in a tree. At other times, I notice the children playing in the park. I see the cloud that looks like a rose. I absorb the scents as I walk around.

And closer to home, I can see the love in my wife's eyes or the look of hunger in my cat's eyes. :wink:

"Living aware" is what David Moy does and what I try to do... and in addition to those benefits, in the past year I've also noticed the stalker who was following us around and the sudden appearance of the punks over in an alleyway when out to a show in Boston.

Those awarenesses brought things up a notch, but after the danger passed, right back to being serenely aware (as david so aptly puts it).


As stated, 99.99% of the population walks around in Condition White... basically oblivious to most of the world around them. They walk around always preoccupied with no "awareness".


As for those that are chronically hypervigilant to the point of always expecting such an attack: In my understanding, that is part of post traumatic stress disorder or a form of paranoia and, in my view, it's neither an appropriate thing to train into someone nor a healthy way to live.


As a response to PTSD, "living aware" (but not paranoid) is actually one of many things that mental health professionals try to teach. Paranoia is a different mental health animal from awareness. There is a huge difference in being aware of the world around you and being afraid or "on guard" all the time. One is based in reality, the other in phobia. Living with awareness is most definitely healthy, paranoia is not.



In the end, the person suffers both physically and mentally/emotionally to the point that it is difficult to distinguish real danger from anything else.


A good definition of paranoia. And when Le points out that:

"They can actually miss seeing trouble when it does present itself."

And Paul points out (from deBecker) that:

"...if you are anxious all the time you can't tell anxiety from the natural warning fear."

BOTH are completely correct from the point of paranoia or anxiety taking over.

I hope I have explained at least a little bit why there is a difference in what is being advocated as far as "living in Condition Yellow" or "living aware" is concerned.

Living in Condition Yellow doesn't mean that I can't totally "let go" and relax with my friends and family around.


Take care.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 12, 2018 8:48 pm

From the Italian MA site, an interview of
Tank Abott by a newspaper:

Tank
I did not want to humiliate the entire UFC organizing group. The _so called “martial artists.” These idiots have never seriously fought in their lives; they train in a dojo and think this is what fighting is about.

The first, and very unique thing that makes up a fighter is his head, his heart, then come the techniques. It has nothing to do with someone [sensei] teaching you to be a tough guy.

I like it when traditional martial artists sit down and say, “I could kill you, I could tear your heart out, but then they don’t do it because it is an antique secret, a tradition to respect.

I then say that I can fly, but cannot show it because it is a sacred thing that has been taught to me, but I can really fly, believe me.

I want to say that all the martial artists who think they are tough don’t realize that in reality they are but a joke.

Furthermore, I want to say to all those con men [senseis] who try to sell “toughness” to those guys by enjoying themselves sweating all day long in a dojo sixty hours a week, so they can see two thousand dollars a month, that I see two thousands dollars every time I sign my credit card bill after a night of drinking. See you in the ring.


Image
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 12, 2018 8:58 pm

This actually drives some reality into the heads of Uechi or other 'tough guys' ideation of being able to take on someone like Tank, as much as they might think they could.

What is important to remember is that there are people like Tank walking around everywhere, and even if not fighters like Tank, going up against them it would feel like colliding with a Mack truck

Image

Stop looking in the mirror asking: oh mirror on the wall 'who's the toughest of them all?'

just accept the fact that some assailants you just don't engage.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 12, 2018 9:07 pm

I want to say that all the martial artists who think they are tough don’t realize that in reality they are but a joke.
Tank :lol:

Now what are you going to be working on ...in your next seminar??
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:58 pm

Laird>>

What sensei Maloney did back then was to say hey stand their like an idiot robot and we bad folk gonna kick your ass and take your money too. BTW were you all keeping your women? He then proceeded to teach us dumb white asses how to move in sanchin. Van you know this story but I'll tell it for you.

The first few folk we sent to full contact bouts in the late sixties early seventies blocked 80 percent of the punches and kicks with their heads. The head had never been a target in the dojo in pre arranged drills or in controlled contact tournaments.

Our fighters went in to these contact events and paid the price.

Jim identified the fixed sanchin kata pose as a problem.

He encouraged all to lift the elbows and pull the hands back to guard the temples elbows in to protect the center.


Many benefits were quickly discovered.

1. Even when you screwed up bad your temple was protected , your jaw was too. You made a mistake but the lights were still on, no one had scrambled the contents of the cranium.

2. Head hunters became frustrated, they could not damage the target. (assumption, enough mobility present to protect the button. Tip of chin to the unfamiliar) This forced them to hunt other targets.

3. The body came next as a target. This is when we discovered a world of opportunity.
The elbows moved up and down . The hands from your temples to the target and back.

4. Targets were uncovered by flexing ,bobbing and weaving. An elusive target was present, but this movement created many new angles to launch the attack from.

5. The fixation on covering the temples forced opponents to go to the body. ( An area that kata and kumite focus on) This is when Uechi was revealed to those of us who played with Jim Maloney's fluid sanchin arm position. (elbow moving up and down). The discoveries were many:

a) Covering the temples encouraged the opponent to attack the mid section.. These attacks could be stopped with a downward elbow strike.(missing in hojo undo Btw)
or a simple twist of the waist while bringing the elbow/forearm across . Suddenly arm conditioning made sense!

Trapping made sense! We could set up folks by showing a little extra belly.

b) All of these elbow strikes forearm deflections left ones body tourqued for a power strike.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Also the slipping/bobbing that he taught moved the head out of “harm’s way” instead of providing a “cigar store Indian” target.

The simple act of covering the temples, by raising the elbows, forces the practitioner to twist at the waist to trap, jam with the elbow, or deflect with the forearm.

Then the beauty of the fully torqued counter punch may be unveiled.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:01 pm

I remember all that and how after the changes Maloney's [raiders] as got to be called...began knocking full contact fighters out in the ring.

Another great KO technique being worked on was the spinning back fist that sent fighters who got hit, out of the ring.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:04 pm

Laird>>

Many may die strong in sanchin, immobile heads there for anyone who chose to target.

Many Uechika disdain the ground – “I will never go to the ground by standing strong in my Sanchin.”

There are those that believe Sanchin is impervious to a leg takedown, until of course you do it to them.

I agree Rick ,most of us, myself included are like a fish on the shore awaiting the end. Lying there gasping for oxygen we wonder what went wrong.

Hell, I went to that class for over three years. I paid that Sensei 1500 dollars. I've got a black belt that hangs to my knees. It's pretty , it's got all kind of writing on it that I can not read.

But I still can not figure how to get that SOB off of the center of my chest and it's starting to get rather unpleasant.

We can cross train in different styles to fill in some of the gaps.

But what is flawed or weaked or poorly understood in Uechi that you take extra time in teaching to your folk?

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:07 pm

david »

You can protect the head by hand positioning and blocking/parrying. You evade by lateral or horizontal movement of the upper body.

You can evade with movement of the whole body. Whatever favored, drill and test and do it all over again.

I also, think whole body movement is not very much evident with a lot of Uechi folks.

I think open hand, palm out, Uechi post position, needs to be considered depending on the individual's finger strength and speed.

Those open fingers can be broken with targeted hits.

Those posted up arm positions make wonderful targets for an edge weapon.


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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:12 pm

david
I think open hand, palm out, Uechi post position, needs to be considered depending on the individual's finger strength and speed. Those open fingers can be broken with targeted hits. Those posted up arm positions make wonderful targets for an edge weapon.


Raffi, in one of his seminars, brought up this subject.

He told us to keep the arms back close to the body/face when facing a knife or you'll end up with severed tendons/ligaments as a start.

All well and good... but when you train one way it is almost impossible to change as the conditioned reflex takes over before you even know what's happening.[operant conditioning]

Also as to the head movement:

Ever hear someone on the test board say he failed the candidate because his head was not moving on a level plane in his kata?

How ridiculous, and generally that remark comes from senseis who never stepped into a ring in their formative years.

I don't know where the answer is. We can speculate until the end of time, but you watch Uechi people keep getting nailed in the head in sparring for dan test.

A 'good kata' alone does not self defense make.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:20 pm

If the circle blocks encompass head protection, the hands should intercept more blows to the head, sport, or defense situation. A conditioned reflex is tweaked along the same sporting or defensive neural patterns.

I am a firm believer that free style events and real defensive situations have many aspects in common.

There is no question in my mind, for example, that someone will be more effective in a self defense situation than the student who does not spar or compete.

We must remember that Dan testing, both here and on Okinawa, that requires the free sparring component, is sending the message that the candidates must show the ability to defend themselves, alas, through the medium of a “sporting” encounter.

And the “sporting” sparring match, especially with the new point system rules, is nothing but a “sporting” device, yet with intent of demonstrating, supposedly _ Street defense abilities.

So the candidate gets punched silly in the head or gets knocked out as we have seen a few times.

Are we saying that in the street he might do better against those headshots? If so please educate us as why it would be so.

So what is he showing to the board? Why not do away with sparring for Dan test entirely then?

After all, in the test, who cares whether the candidate can “spar” _ we want to see the ability to defend himself.

As to the Uechi hand position, i don’t think that they are meant to be kept stationary i think the hands should be kept moving, ready to catch and control, and that relates to the style being used as a street fighting method rather than competition


True, but even the ones that do that, get clocked in the head. So what’s missing?

These are all good questions worth exploring, the more the better.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:22 pm

hthom »

At the risk of repeating what you folks might have already said, I think the problem is from either inadequate practice or due to a misunderstanding that "it is the Uechi way".

I am one of those who feel that sparring (I mean the go-at-it kind of sparring)is a great way to train and is part of the "package".

One gets a broken finger and one should learn not to stick them out the next time (yes I have broken all my fingers at least once but I been told I never learn, ask my ex-wife, ask my second wife---),

one gets his head kicked once and one should learn to bring his hands up higher and move around more.

Besides, I believe that the more a student spars, the less nervous he would or should be in a real life mano to mano situation.

Instead of getting into street fights just to train the nervousness part of the equation like someone I know did but that was centuries ago---

Henry
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 13, 2018 7:59 pm

Good points...

And by sparring everyone should see if he can function against other styles...in particular against TKD fighters who will throw deadly spinning kicks Uechi people don't get exposed to in their training.

It has nothing to do with 'stealing the centre' and other stuff...

You go into some of those TKD spins and you get hit in the back of your head if you don't know how to prepare for them...

Some of you reading this might recall some of the TKD kos against Uechi fighters in years past.

And then there are the spinning back kicks/jumping etc.

Take a good look here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkLbn0kQezE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bb6bWJAmMCk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clvwjorFUPA
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