Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:48 pm

I've often thought that this is true. For example, when I'm at work no matter what I'm doing I know exactly when it's lunchtime and exactly when it's 5 o'clock and time to go home. However, when I'm in my local pub, the Griffin, I can never remember the how long I've there or when I have to go home. I can now blame my SCN for these aberrations.

Marcus Muktasingh, Forest Hill London

Why does time slow down for some people in a crisis situation, yet speed up for others with the same experience?
karen sullivan, Durango, Colorado, USA

I am very sceptical about the experiments described above. Siffre's 1962 experiment could only have explained that we are conditioned into a 24 hour day and not that it is due to evolution. The only way of proving this would be to put a new-born in the cave, which would be unethical. Simiar studies with animals showed a natural cycle produced by the SCN, but with wake/sleep periods much longer than 24 hours.
Richard Gilpin, Bristol, UK
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:50 pm

I've lived with this all my adult life, except I cannot sleep until after 3am, and if I wake up before 10am I feel dreadful all day. I have lived several places around the world, and the problem follows me.

Andy, Hong Kong

For me it's very much which hours of night I sleep and not strictly how long. If I sleep around 10pm I get refreshed after 7 hours. But if I sleep after 11pm even after 12 hours of sleep I still wake up exhausted.

Also apart from babyhood, I never managed to sleep in the afternoon until I I was in my late teens at university. And to do so I had to draw the curtains and cover up.

Victor, Newport, Wales
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:52 pm

The first part of this story has to be a joke. I've changed my bodys' natural rhythm so many times I've lost count. In basic training for the army I went to sleep at 10pm and woke at 4:30.

At the stock exchange I went to sleep at 2am and woke at 7. When I became a waiter I went to sleep between 2-4 am and woke at 11am. If the people in the story just tweaked their sleep schedule they'd be fine. No need for another "syndrome."

Thadd, Orlando, USA
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:53 pm

Very interesting experiment but I don't quite believe it proves much at all- maybe time doesn't slow but we're more perceptive to a greater amount of information in dangerous situations? A sort of defence mechanism to help us find our way out of danger? Just a thought...

Alex, Lancaster

Is this something you have from day one, or is it something you can "get" later on??? It may explain why I'm waking up ready to get up at 2 in the morning.

Carol Daniel , Houston TX USA
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:55 pm

While the case described is clearly an extreme one, it's not news to some of us that body clocks vary widely. I have the opposite problem: I have always found it extremely hard to get up early, and even if I do I am rarely functioning properly before late morning.

On the other hand, I have no difficulty staying up late: I am rarely in bed before 1.30am, and am frequently still awake at 3am or later. Even if I'm lacking in sleep, I usually find I become more alert at 10 or 11 in the evening, which usually thwarts any plans I might have had for an early night.

I have frequently been labelled lazy for my reluctance to get up in the morning, even though I don't think I sleep for significantly longer than most people do, and I'm sure there are those who regard me as dissolute because of my late night habits.

I have frequently been told that I would feel so much better if only I went to bed earlier, but I simply don't think this is true - any more than it is that people who are at their best in the early morning would feel better if they tried to imitate my sleep pattern.

Our society is not set up to deal with people with naturally different sleep rhythms, and I am convinced that society as a whole (as well as the people concerned) suffers as a result.

Enforcing standard working hours of nine till five will not produce the best results if a significant proportion of the workforce is not functioning at full strength until 11am or later.

The advent of flexi-time is a big help, and some of us are lucky enough to have jobs that allow us to plan our own time, but there are many who are not so fortunate, and spend years feeling permanently exhausted as a result of being forced into an unnatural sleep pattern by a world that for some unfathomable reason regards being awake early as somehow more virtuous and valuable than staying awake late.

Meriel, Oxford
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:56 pm

An alternative explanation for being able to resolve a rapidly flickering "perceptual chronometer" is that rapid eye movements (so-called saccades) cause the different LED images to be projected onto different parts of the retina.

This effect can sometimes be seen by glancing from one side of a flickering display (a mains LED alarm clock, for example) to another, suppressing your normal reflex eye-blink. Were the subject's eye movements monitored during the experiment to guard against such changes of fixation point?

Oliver Josephs, London, UK
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:57 pm

It seems to me that the free-fall experiment could be measuring the effect of adrenaline on eyesight or neural processing of visual input, rather than time distortion. A better experiment might be to have people estimate the passage of time when they're in life-or-death situations, such as relatives of trauma victims.

Jeremy, Atlanta, USA
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:58 pm

I can vouch that time runs slower (or your brain speeds up in a crisis). In my first parachute jump my 'chute didn't open correctly.

To cut a long story short, I sorted it, and landed safely, but my instructor asked how long it took me to sort myself out. I replied that it was probably about a minute.

He replied, "It took you less than 7 seconds.....". I still swear to this day that it took me a minute in my mind.

Simon Howarth, Preston, UK
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:59 pm

I know when I am ill (or going to be ill) as time seems to go inexorably slowly. The night after my spinal surgery, it was like the minutes of the hands never moved, but once I got better, time returned to "normal". I find now that time "slowing down" for me is an indicator that I am brewing an illness. Weird but true!

Nina Bunton, Bristol, UK
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:37 pm

Neural Based Scenario Training:

Darren Laur »

Hi Van, haven't been around much, very busy here work and at the school. I was however on the road teaching recently which always allows me time to write. Here's an article that I have wanted to write for about a year now, I hope you and others on the forum enjoy it.
Darren


Neural Based Scenario Training:
A Holistic Approach to Anchoring Combative Motor Skill Performance To An Optimum Combative State


As many on this forum know through my past postings, I am a proponent of integrating a variety of training methodologies, including NLP and Hypnotherapy, for the purpose of enhancing motor skill performance during what I have called Survival Stress Reaction (SSR); please see my article on the Anatomy of Fear located at: http://www.personalprotectionsystems.ca ... ticles.htm .

One of the challenges that we face as instructors however, is how do we get our students to transition their training and skills from the school to the street if, and when, the time comes?

How often have we seen students who are skilled in practice (closed mode) apply their training in a less-desirable context when called upon in an actual self-protection situation (open mode).


It is my opinion that although we all train the physical, and some train the cognitive, most of us fail to train the emotional “states” that need to be “anchored” to both the physical and cognitive attributes during combatives training.


The physical, cognitive, and emotional aspects to training are a holistic or synergistic three-legged chair, if one leg is missing then the chair will collapse!!! It is my opinion that those who can integrate this holistic and synergistic combatives state approach in training, will more likely be able to transition their skills from the school to the street, thus optimizing their combative performance during SSR.

Darren
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 17, 2019 4:46 am

Darren laur>>

Another very important component to anchoring an optimum combative state to a learned motor skill is to ensure that during physical practice, students, once they become consciously competent, begin to practice their skills with each other utilizing “imagination” and “emotion”.

In other words, students should be visualizing the context in which the motor skill learned will be used, again bringing in all their sensory modalities. Rather than just hitting a bag, they should visualize the bag is a threat intent on hurting them, someone they love, or someone who is under their care and control.

Again the subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between fantasy and reality, the more real the training, the more likely you can develop the optimum combative state and anchor the learned motor skills to that state.

To take this one step further, prior to participating in a NBST simulation, students should also visualize or imagine (see my article on Combative Based Action Imagery) what their plan “A”, “B”, and “C” strategy will be against possible threats, but also give themselves permission to adapt, overcome, and improvise when needed.

The secret here is to train in an optimum combative state (physically, cognitively, and emotionally) because if you do, you will more likely operate in an optimum combative state when the s**t hits the fan in the real world when SSR is triggered.

NBST optimally conditions or “anchors” the brain (both conscious and subconscious) to using your non-verbal, verbal, and combative motor skills in an open mode (real world) environment during the pre-contact, contact, and post-contact intervention stages of an actual confrontation.

In my opinion, most traditional martial art schools, and even some who say they teach RBSD/Combatives, are mistakenly anchoring, not knowing any better, combative state to their closed mode training of the school, training studio, or dojo.

This is, in my opinion, the primary reason why I believe we see students not being able to transfer combative skills learned, to the reality of the street.

Darren
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 17, 2019 4:50 am

Darren Laur>>

This is why instructors must be careful that they do not allow a student to anchor a less desirable response to a combative state, which is easy to do if an instructor is not schooled and skilled in NBST.

It is also important that NBST simulations are structured around unknown, low, medium, and high threat responses.

As we all know, not every street encounter can be considered a “deadly force” threat.

Again by anchoring a combative state to a variety of incremental threat responses, we are best preparing our students for a desirable outcome based upon their perception of threat (context) in the real world.

The brain, through NBST conditioning, is more likely to say under SSR, “Been there done that, and I know what to do, and will do it”

Darren
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 17, 2019 4:57 am

My views on this:

Your training not withstanding_ What happens when what you thought would work didn't, and suddenly you feel your jaw snap, or feel the rice-crispies texture of your fractured voice box, and suddenly find yourself unable to breathe, choking on your own blood?

Are you scared? What if the only thing standing between your wife and your attacker, is your failed, broken body?

Are you now angry? What drives a man to hobble on a leg with a snapped knee to finish an opponent? Pride? A need for justice? A drive to protect the weak?

There is no Zen here; it is horrifying, barbaric and very real. No one can predict the human reaction to the physical aggression of another.

The only thing that can be said for sure is that it will be brutal ...an emotional assault upon the senses along with the physical and this is what we don’t learn in a dojo.

Tony Blauer covers the same ground.

Good training is not intended to decrease your anger at some slimeball for daring to attack you. It is also not intended to prevent you from having fear in a deadly situation. Fear is nature's way of telling you something is wrong.

Good training is intended to help you learn to function DESPITE the fear and anger you would naturally have.

The ‘caveman’ instinct is the survival instinct _ It is up to you to discover what will trigger your "primitive side" or you will perish.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 17, 2019 5:00 am

Ryan Labbe-Clark »

If someone is serious about reality self-defense this is a great way to train. It’s realistic and cuts thru the crap .I’ve been thru it and I can tell you that it does not matter what rank or status you have when sh*t hit’s the fan there is nothing pretty about it. You survive or you don’t. That’s reality.

Speccolli
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 17, 2019 5:03 am

Ryan Labbe-Clark »

I just got back from Victoria B. C were I had a chance to train at Mr. Laur's School , Twice a week for about 6 months. One of the things I found interesting was doing combative drill with the lights off , Strobe lights on, smoke machine and loud heavy metal music playing.

Even though I did those drills many times before and trained in that room many times before, the fact that my senses were diminish change everything. I could hardly see my attacker because of the darkness and the strobe lights and could not hear much except for the music.My attacker is six feet in front of me and next thing you know his punch is 6 inches from the face.

I won't lie, I did get hit a few( many) times.The drill taught me to react and dominate the attaker even under sensory overload. Better to discover your short comings in a drill like this than to find them on the street.

More latter...

BTW Laird says hello. :angel:

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