Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:48 pm

When I mention this, I am met often with vehement protests that these programs do teach avoidance, de-escalation and personal safety.

Ignoring the obvious sports roots of what is being taught for the moment (which doesn't work against larger stronger opponents), despite the volume of the protests one question stands out:

How much do you practice fighting vs. how much time is spent learning how to avoid having to fight?


If a significant majority of the time is spent on physical techniques and drills, then you are being taught how to fight.

And that training will get you in trouble with the law.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:56 pm

Chris
Have you seen or investigated situations where a claim of self-defense by a Dan rank held "no water" with a jury or a judge? Can you provide some real-life anecdotes?
I am asking as this appears to be a serious issue with those of us who actually do stand up to the "bad guys".


Only one 30 years ago. It involved a black belt under Al Ford sensei of Uechi pioneer fame.

My company had the liability insurance policy on a club.

He was a doorman who used it to defend against drunken punks. He was found guilty by a criminal judge and we settled the resultant law suit by the injured party.

The law seems to be that if you possess such ‘deadly knowledge’ then your standard of care must be higher than the average person...and that's how the prosecution will attack you.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:01 am

MikeK »

Just a bit of an alternate view of some of the people in the story. I'm just putting this out for discussion based on Mike's description of the situation. Please take them just as an abstract based on Mike's telling.


An older lady spoke up and told the agressor that he was acting like an ass. He cursed at the older lady.


These people are not your friend when things are dicey. I've been in one or two, seen a few more and heard about other situations that escalated because of these busy body bigmouths.

Be careful of these people and be aware of them getting involved as a third party as they can move a situation from yellow to orange to red with their comments in a second, leaving you to deal with it.


An aside: Environmental Awareness is more than just about polluting the air.
Something that my instructor often works on with me is seeing the "weapons" that are available.

One reason is so that I can learn to use them and another is so I can see what the BG could possibly pick up to use against me. Your environment matters.

I was dreaming of the past...

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:04 am

Mike
These people are not your friend when things are dicey. I've been in one or two, seen a few more and heard about other situations that escalated because of these busy body bigmouths. Be careful of these people and be aware of them getting involved as a third party as they can move a situation from yellow to orange to red with their comments in a second, leaving you to deal with it.


True. They escalate and then bail out leaving you in dire jeopardy. And they will testify against you if their self interest is at stake. Like being afraid of retaliation by the bad guy.


This aspect is a very critical one to consider. Would you testify against a gang banger if you have a wife and kids and a nice house? Witness intimidation is around the corner.

Think again and be honest with yourself. Your name and address will be on file at the police station and available to the bad guy’s lawyer. I know of people who moved out of town after the trial was over.

Something that my instructor often works on with me is seeing the "weapons" that are available


Excellent_ the reason why I posed that question of MikeD _

Weapons and shields + strategic nooks and crannies + escape routes _
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:07 am

MikeK »

Self-defense isn't about doing kata , drills, moves or using techniques, doing conditioning etc. _that would be martial arts ‘tooling’


Van, I really like that and will be "stealing" that from you.

Van Canna wrote:

Weapons and shields + strategic nooks and crannies + escape routes _


Knowing how to use nooks and crannies is very important, but in karate we learn in a very austere environment. No nooks, no crannies, we essentially learn in a white room which could have the side effect of making us blind to our real world environment.

Weapons and shields.

IMO from my too brief exposure to Uechi it gives you most of what you need to use improvised tools without any traditional kobudo training.

Just go to a Pier 1 (for example), pick something up (don't look for anything in particular that looks like a weapon) and see if it's a pointy thing or blunt, is it hard or soft, rigid or flexible.

As soon as you figure that out you should have a good idea what targets to use it on. Most of that info is in the kata and the conditioning. Rich teaches from day one how to use a jacket with one of the hojo undo so there's another source.

The hard part of using makeshift weapons is training the mind to see what it has at hand instead of looking for something specific.

I was dreaming of the past...

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:10 am

MikeK »

Van Canna wrote:
A good way to teach is to tell your students > Now, quick_+look around and tell me what potential weapons/shields do you see? <

And practice this during the day, now and then, no matter where they might be, including their own homes or a public restroom, doctor's office or church.


Very good advice, but I'd like to add one little thing.
One of the first "weapons" my friend showed me was an old dead pine tree. You could pull branches off of it but better yet you could push someone into the one of the many sharp broken branches and into the trunk.

Now, as an example, with that image in my mind I see how I might use a fire hydrant as a weapon. So we should also remind the student that not all weapons are ones that you can pick up.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:13 am

Mike
> Now, as an example, with that image in my mind I see how I might use a fire hydrant as a weapon. So we should also remind the student that not all weapons are ones that you can pick up.<

Sure enough.

Now, for the moment, let's go to into the prosecutor's mind about to argue that you should be convicted of assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon_ to wit_ the hydrant...the wall...the floor
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:14 am

MikeK »

Seriously, that question does go to the other part of knowing about and possible usage of these "weapons". If you are not having to use lethal force you darn well better know the possible outcomes of pushing someone into something sharp or slamming their head into the floor.

By knowing these things you may even save the life of your adversary by stopping him from falling into something dangerous, which could also save you a trip to the slammer. I think it's the same rules that Rich teaches in his CHP course.

In the end you are responsible for what happens to the other person, so you better be aware of what you are doing.

BTW, Good questions to ask. My instructor Don does the same thing as it's an important part of how he teaches.

I was dreaming of the past...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 2:58 pm

"Road rage" may be result of mental illness

There seems to be no end to the sickness of the human mind.

Next time you are up against some 'road rage' situation, it might help to consider the information in this article...

https://www.autoblog.com/2006/06/09/roa ... l-illness/

Symptoms of IED include multiple bouts of anger that are out of proportion to the situation and which include a threat of violence or actual aggressive action towards a person or property. Said to be related to improper functioning of serotonin in the brain, the average age of onset is 14, with an average of 43 outbursts over one's lifetime.

The study was based on a national face-to-face survey of 9,282 U.S. adults who answered diagnostic questionnaires in 2001-03. It was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health.

About 5 percent to 7 percent of the nationally representative sample had had the disorder, which would equal up to 16 million Americans. That is higher than better-known mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Coccaro said.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 2:59 pm

The average number of lifetime attacks per person was 43, resulting in $1,359 in property damage per person. About 4 percent had suffered recent attacks.
The findings were released Monday in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

The findings show the little-studied disorder is much more common than previously thought, said lead author Ronald Kessler, a health care policy professor at Harvard Medical School.

"This is a well-designed, large-scale, face-to-face study with interesting and useful results," said Dr. David Fassler, a psychiatry professor at the University of Vermont.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:02 pm

"The findings also confirm that for most people, the difficulties associated with the disorder begin during childhood or adolescence, and they often have a profound and ongoing impact on the person's life."

Jennifer Hartstein, a psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center in New York, said she had just diagnosed the disorder in a 16-year-old boy.

"In most situations, he is relatively affable, calm and very responsible," she said. But in stressful situations at home, he "explodes and tears apart his room, throws things at other people" to the point that his parents have called the police.

Hartstein said the study is important because many people are not aware of the disorder.


This can be a ticket to an early grave or to confinement for life behind prison bars.
People with this disorder also invite an out of proportion response action by certain alpha males at large.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:04 pm

Chris Hess »

I take what I call an "Aikido approach to driving."

Those of you familiar with the art of Aikido will appreciate this.

Remember that "It is easier to avoid a problem than to get out of one."
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:14 pm

Remember that "It is easier to avoid a problem than to get out of one."


Many times the 'avoidance' concept collides with the 'inner machismo' we possess and 'hone' by the study of martial arts...we read of this in Rory's books and McYoung's articles on his wonderful website.

One helpful thought in making one drift towards avoidance...is the fact that, quite aside from the legal complications....you will have to come up with thousands of dollars for legal representation in a continuous out flow from your pockets...this seems to 'calm' the inner beast...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:28 pm

__ Dr Paul Lam MD
As in all Qigong, correct breathing is of vital importance.

Breathing in while drawing and breathing out while shooting.

Chen Jin (one of the most famous Chen style master whose writing was responsible for making Chen style known outside the Chen village) said when opening your are solid outside and soft inside and when closing you should be soft outside and solid inside.

For example, in the Chen style 36 Form, Form 34 Forward Cannon Punch, bringing both fists backward and downward to near the left hip (see picture one) is drawing the bow, then the punching with both fists (picture two) is shooting the arrow.

Breathe in while storing energy, your outside is solid and inside soft; then breathe out when punching out with the outside soft (and elastic) and inside solid (Qi sinks to the Dan Tian). When breathing in Qi moves upwards and when breathing out Qi sinks downward.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:35 pm

http://chirontraining.blogspot.com/2006 ... aking.html

Rory Miller
Breaking

Muscles grow through exercise, I am told, because the effort causes tiny tears in the fibers. They don't actually grow during exercise but through the healing process during periods of rest. Learning is like that too- under good instruction and through dedicated effort there is a growth process composed of microscopic acts of destruction.

A punch is not perfected by doing something 'more'- it is perfected by removing every motion, every tension anything and everything that is not a punch from the motion. The hallmark of good fighting is simple efficiency- if my line is simpler, my distance shorter, my power generation cleaner, my targeting more efficient... I will win.

Teaching, at least for what I teach, has more in common with a sculptor chipping away at any piece of marble that doesn't match her inner vision than at a mason building a rock wall.
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