Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 10, 2019 5:53 pm

Something Rory wrote

Part of doing "anything it takes" involves training. Part of doing "anything it takes" involves getting used to discomfort.

Shooting, I think, is easier to fantasize about because it is more visual than tactile. The feelings of shooting are a hard object in your hand, a little resistance at your finger and a sharp jerk of recoil.

There's not a lot of sweat and fear smell and slipperiness and stretching or popping.

The sounds of shooting are loud but sharp (but at twenty five yards with a .45 I have heard the separate slap of the bullet hitting the target and that would be a terrible sound in flesh.)

The sounds of fighting and hurting at close range are quieter but more emotional- the melon thump of head on concrete, the bell tone of head into a steel counter, the rip/crunch of a body slammed into drywall, the gasping and sometimes screaming or gurgling, the tears, snaps and rips of tissues parting.

And let's not get into smells, I like the smell of shooting.

Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe there is a certain percentage of people who can be squeamish, hesitant and inattentive in training and turn into technically superb tigers in combat. But I doubt it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 10, 2019 5:55 pm

And this is a favorite

PANELING:

The basic idea is that a handful of experts get in front of a room and talk about a subject and answer questions from the audience.

The audience is theoretically composed of a mix of fans who wish to be more informed and wannabe professionals who are trying to learn more information to give their writing or art some substance.

Lets just say that the standard for what qualifies as an expert can be pretty low.

On one panel we had an MD in the audience who knew more about the subject than all the panelists combined.

On the other hand, in other panels we had some people who thought they knew more about the subject than the whole panel combined, yet somehow had failed to master basic hygiene.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 10, 2019 7:09 pm

Kuma-de »

Van-san,

Anyway, I'm not sure that I told this story on this board or not. But working the Midnight shift in the Great State of Maine often left you w/o back up (b/u) in a timely manner.

You often had to tussle the bad guy until b/u arrived 30-50 miles away. It may be a local department or the sheriff's department, depending where you were.

I was running radar on Route 27 in beautiful Boothbay Harbor at the intersection of Route 96, when a car load of kids came down the hill towards me at over 65 MPH in a 25 MPH zone.

Instantly, my radar shrilly rang and scared the donut right out of my hands. :( 8O Luckily, I did not spill my ever present cup of coffee. :D

This really peeved me, losing a perfectly good "fat pill" (donut), so these kids were definitely going to get a ticket!

As I pulled them over and before I could call in my locus and plate number of these donut creeps, 6 kids jumped out of the car screaming something about "BIG KNIFE", "To my throat", "FORCED ME" "Ride" all at once.

I determined through my lacking fat pill hazed mind that these kids were not a threat to me but alas victims in some sought of crime!! (Pretty astute, huh :idea: )

It appears these young high school students were at a "kegger" ( a party where kids under-age drink and they pool their resources to get a big keg of beer and smoke dope, etc.) and when they were leaving they came across a nit wit that was walking down the dirt path that led to the site.

The guy stops them and demands a ride into town, but the kids defer because it is the opposite direction that they are going and their car is full.

Bad guy does not GAS!! (Give A Sh*T) and pulls out a 12" blade and sticks it to the driver's throat and yells "drive me!" He then somehow proceeds to crawl onto the roof of the vehicle w/ the blade still in place and yells "GO."

He hangs on for a 6 mile jaunt into town where he is dropped off. They, then scared panty-less, turn around fleeing from him.

I had their licenses or ID's in my hand and tell them not to go anywhere as I was going to take a look for this nitwit that deprived me of my perfect pastry.

I start into town with my 4-barrel (old school definition) kicking in and hit 50+ at the top of the hill, as I start the slight turn at the top of the hill, I saw him standing in the middle of the road screaming with knife in hand. Long black hair, black tee shirt and ripped jeans.

I locked up the breaks and skidded to a stop just before smashing into him. Up goes the knife in both hands over his head, and like he was chopping wood, thrusts the knife downward into the hood of my now donut less police car!!

Man, this was really pissing me off!! First the donut and now a knife in my hood!! I really needed a donut fix!!

I got out and came after him, luckily he was unable to pull the knife out of the hood, as I seized onto him. The PCP was good that year because he crazed out on me immediately. Growling, swearing, spitting and trying to bite me. (Somewhere in my mind I was thinking that I should have picked up my donut, brushed it off and ignored the speeding car.)

We had quite the tussle, lights going on in nearby houses and people gawking out their windows.

Utilizing all the tools at my disposal (that means beating the snot out of him!! No, utilizing enough force necessary to bring the non-compliant suspect into compliance) I got him cuffed and stuffed.

I then returned to where I had left the kiddies and watched as they gawked at the knife embedded into my hood and the bad guy snuggled neatly in the cage of my back seat spewing epitaphs and nasty spew from his drool.

"That's him!!" They exclaimed as if seeing Santa Claus for the first time!!

The Sergeant was not too happy with my new hood ornament when he saw it the next day! But thought it was "sharp!" (Pun intended)

Now, for the real punch line. "NOT GUILTY!!"

The case was heard before a retired-active judge who did not believe the kids and despite his assault on me and the charges in that separate fiasco. He did not think it possible for him to hold on 6-miles with a knife to the kid's throat.

Okay judge, it was 5.9 miles and if they had stopped they would have been easily cut in two just like a fresh puffy donut!!

He wasn't out of prison for too long though, we eventually returned him to the Maine State Institution of Higher Learning (Prison) for drug charges and acting "AIP" (as*hole in public).
Jim Prouty
New England Budo Center
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 10, 2019 7:12 pm

TSDguy »

Spike is currently (as of 10:25 EST) showing a show on jail violence. Spike and Fox ALWAYS have these shows on so I wouldn't normally mention it, but a lot of the things I'm seeing relate to this forum and more importantly Jesus it's violent.

All it is is people beating and stabbing each other on video tape but there is so much to see and learn.

It's called "Prisoners out of Control".
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 10, 2019 7:14 pm

TSDguy »

Two things that stand out to me are:
1) we get to see surprise attacks. Normally videos are of "duels" or "street fights". These are attacks on the show.

2) The absolute psychoticness of some criminals. They aren't high, but they won't stop no matter WHAT. It's sickening how intent on killing they are, no SWAT team can dissuade them, no chemicals, no flash-bangs... they keep attacking.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:26 pm

Putting Sanchin to work

Drill for Skill - Cornerman Drill

By Bus Rutten

http://tinyurl.com/y36ajkz5

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4Kqx2kd ... ed&search=

I recall this being the one drill Jim Maloney used from sanchin, that was instrumental in the great development of his kickboxer National champions he produced in Canada.

Certainly a worthwhile drill in addition to our many others.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:33 pm

Darren Laur »

Big Brain Info On Crime and Violence aka Research Stats



With some of the discussions recently surrounding knives, weapons, injuries, and violent crime, and being a creature of “probability” based upon credible research, I thought I would provide some of the following research information that I utilize to support my thoughts, opinions, and training:


“Violence Related Injuries Treated In Hospital Emergency Departments” (Bureau Justice Statistics 1994)


Although dated, this study does offer some nuggets:

§ In 1994 1.3 million people treated in US emergency wards were for injuries contributed to violence

Although this number appears to be large, this only represents 1.5% of all visits to ER’s

§ 94% sustained injuries from the assault that required treatment

§ 2% were injured during a completed or attempted robbery

According to this study, 98% of all robberies committed the victim was not injured. This, to me, supports the fact that if someone wants your property give it to them. There are those who say that if robbed you should still fight because you don’t know if the offender will beat you, stab you, or shoot you after they get what they want. Although this is a reality, it is a rarity (according to this study only 2% of the time).

....>>>>
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:35 pm

Darren Laur »

Of those treated in the ER:

§ 34% were treated for bruises of similar injuries
§ 31% for cuts or stabs (total of 433,500 victims)
§ 17% for fractures, sprains, dislocations, dental injuries
§ 5% for gun shots (70,300 victims)
§ 5% for rapes
§ 4% for concussions of other head injuries


People who committed these violent acts:

§ 23% were strangers
§ 23% were a friend or acquaintance
§ 10% by a current of former boyfriend or girlfriend
§ 8% by parent or sibling
§ 7% by spouse of ex-spouse


Again this study confirms that most (77%) who will commit a violent act against you will be someone who you know, love, or trust.

Although the unknown bad guy is a reality (especially when it comes to robberies), it is a rarity.


In this study, they also found that approximately 14% of the victims or offenders had been drinking or using drugs.

>>>>>>
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:36 pm

Darren Laur »

The next study of interest:

“US Department of Justice – Bureau of Justice Stats 2005”


§ 7/10 victims stated that the attacker was someone they either knew, loved, or trusted

This supports the above noted ER study. Both this study and the ER study also provide us, as trainers, with the fact that when it comes to neural based scenario training, we want to ensure that some of the aggressor in the script are described as someone the fighter knows, loves, or trusts.


§ 74% stated those that robbed them was a stranger


Again, this stat, does support many other studies that have reported out that those who commit violent robberies are “usually” strangers.



§ 53% of violent crimes occurred during the day 6am – 6pm


Most people believe that violent crimes occur at a much higher frequency during nighttime hours. Again this study, as well as others, proves this to be wrong.


§ For violent crimes, about half occurred within a mile from home, and 76% within 5 miles. Only 4% reported that the crime took place more than 50 miles from their home.


Anecdotally, I believe that human nature makes us believe that the closer to home we are, the safer we will be. Because of this fact, we have a tendency to lower our awareness radar the closer we are to home, which sends a message to a potential predator; “TARGET”. The fact remains that awareness and vigilance is an important safety attribute that we need to employ at all times.

>>>>
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:39 pm

Darren Laur »

§ 24% of incidents involved a weapon


According to this study, almost ¼ of all violent incidents involved a weapon. Unfortunately they do not break down the weapon type specific to this stat. However, when it came to homicides the study found:

§ 71% were committed with a firearm (55% handgun 16% long gun)
§ 14% with knives
§ 5% with blunt objects
§ 11% with other weapon


These numbers support the fact that weapon defense training should form an important part of self-protection training.


Unlike the ER study (14%), this report found that 30% of offenders were reported to be intoxicated by alcohol or drug.

>>>
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:45 pm

Darren Laur »


Another study of interest:

“Weapon Use and Violent Crime 1993-2001, Bureau of Justice Statistics”


§ 26% of violent victimizations between 1993-2001 involved a weapon


This stat supports the above-noted 2005 DOJ study


§ Of the 26% of violent victimizations, 10% were committed with firearms, 6% with knives, and the other 10% with other weapons such as blunt objects


§ While victimization involving knives comprised 6% of all violent crimes resulting in an injury, these victimizations accounted for about 24% of all serious injuries experienced by crime victims compared with firearms 13%, and blunt weapons 20%.

Specific to Robberies, I offer the following study from Great Britain, which also reflects what is happening in Canada and the US as well:


“A Qualitative Study of The Role of Violence In Street Crime, 2002”


In this research study, the authors identified five main motives for street robberies:

(1) Good Times / Partying:

Money or property obtained was used to finance gambling, drugs, or alcohol. In most cased the property/money obtained was used for pleasure pursuits such as partying or having a good time.


(2) Keeping up appearance / flash Cash:

Here the proceeds of a robbery are used to purchase non-essential, status-enhancing items such as jewelry, clothing, vehicles so as to show off on the street.


(3) Buzz/Excitement:

Known as the “seduction of crime”, the robbery offers a “high” that offers emotional benefits that was seen to be both fun and exciting to the criminal.

Some even reported that the buzz was greater when the victim resisted.

When the victim did resist, the challenge to the robber was even greater and so too was the reward of ultimately winning over and completing the robbery.



(another reason why, in my opinion not to resist a property type robbery)


(4) Anger/Desire:

Robbery is prompted by anger to start a fight, with cash being taken only as an afterthought. Here the attackers primary aim was to attack somebody and the level of violence used to commit the offence was beyond that required to secure the victim’s compliance

(5) Informal Justice / Rights Wronged:

Here a robbery was committed as a kind of informal justice in which the offender felt he/she had righted some wrong done to them. “Taking Back” money they believed was owed to them was the main factor

>>
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:46 pm

Darren Laur »

This study also found a direct correlation between drugs and robbery as well. In this study the authors found 4 main drug related motives for robbery:


(1) To fund dependent drug use (based upon desperation)

(2) To fund recreational drug use (more of a desire to party than addiction based)

(3) Robberies committed under the influence of drugs (about 15% of robberies)

(4) Drug involvement in the commission of robbery as part of informal justice. (Example: he sold me two bags of bunk and I realized it wasn’t the heroin I paid for, so I took my money back, punched him in the face and took off)

>>
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:49 pm

Darren Laur »

Specific to weapons, this study reported that of the 100 criminals interviewed, who committed a robbery:

§ 28% reported carrying a gun
§ 35% reported carrying another weapon other than a gun
§ 37% reported carrying no weapon

The last study of interest:

“ Non-Firearm Weapon Use and injury Severity: Priorities For Prevention” U.K. 2006


§ Study sample 24,660 ER patients injured in a “reported” assault
§ Men accounted for 74.5% of the sample
§ 21.5% of injuries were committed with a weapon. Of these 11% of all injuries were inflicted with a sharp object, and 10.5% were inflicted with a blunt object
§ Most patients had one injury 81%
§ 14.6% had two injuries
§ 4.5% had more than two injuries

§ 62% victims reported being attacked by one person
§ 12.3% victims reported being attacked by two persons
§ 25.7% victims reported being attacked by three or more persons
§ 41.1% of injuries sustained were to the face

§ 24.9% of injuries were sustained to head and neck
§ 5.3% of injuries were to the thorax
§ 2.5% of injuries were to the abdomen
§ 20% of injuries were to the upper limbs
§ 6.3% of injuries were to the lower limbs
§ 2.4% of patients lost consciousness during the assault

§ Weapon use was more likely to result in serious injury than if a weapon was not used
§ Compared with being injured with a fist, the use of blunt objects, feet, sharp objects and other body parts was considerably more likely to result in severe injury

>>
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:54 pm

Darren Laur »

What was most interesting in this research study, was the fact that they found the use of feet resulted in the greatest injury severity, when compared to the use of other blunt objects, and that sharp object (edged weapons) was the next most likely to result in severe injury.

To me this is another reason why one cannot stay on the ground given the probability of being kicked or stomped by your attacker or their friends.


Specific to knives, I attempted to locate research specific to:

1. At what point did the offender have their weapon deployed, and

2. What kind of occurrence rate is there for knife to knife encounters


Unfortunately I could not find any Peer reviewed research on these two topics, but I did just recently read a book by James Lafond called, “The Logic of Steel, a Fighters View of Blade and Shank Encounters 2001”.

Based upon a large number of interviews (1000 separate acts of violence), the author created something that he called a “Violence Index”. Although not a peer reviewed scientific study, Lafond does offer some retrospective empirical/anecdotal research that is of some interest and does correspond with some of the above noted research:

§ 59% of incidents occur outside
§ 59% of incident occurred after dark
§ 69% of incidents were described as an attack rather than a consensual fight
§ 53% involved alcohol or drugs
§ 25% of violence resulted in at least one party being knocked out

§ 63% of violent acts were resolved in less than 10 seconds
§ 25% of violent acts lasted from 10 seconds to 1 minute
§ 13% lasted more than a minute
§ 57% of aggressions were successful, 32% by knockout
§ 13% of defences were successful, 50% by knockout

§ 32% of aggressors were armed
§ 8% of defenders were armed
§ 7% of aggressors required medical attention
§ 28% of defenders required medical attention
§ 1% of aggressors died
§ 4% of aggressors died
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:56 pm

Darren Laur »

Specific to incidents of weapon use per 1000 acts reviewed:

§ Edged weapons 11%
§ Firearms 10%
§ Clubs, rocks, sticks 8%


According to LaFond, in most edged weapon attacks, the attacker already had their weapon deployed, and the vast majority of attacks lasted less than 10 seconds.

This supports the fact that unless the fighter (defender) already has their knife pre-deployed prior to engagement, the defender will have very little time to deploy their own weapon.

This fact is also compounded when you also factor in Survival Stress Reaction, retrieving a holstered or pocketed knife, combined with the attacker’s already violent engagement.


Specific to knife-to-knife encounters, LaFond reported that this type of occurrence in extremely rare.
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