Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 12:38 am

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 3:19 am

Tim larkin
Self defense training means many things:

It is the moral imperative we use to draw a line between predatory and “civilized” use of force: “I will only fire in self defense.”

It is the legal rule we use to judge whether or not that use of force is a crime: “The defendant claims to have acted in self defense.”

It’s a catchall term used to describe physical training for such activities: “I’m taking a self defense class.”

It can also refer to the unarmed techniques learned there: “If someone comes after me I’ll use self defense training on him.”

It means many things—and this vague imprecision is exactly why it is useless for our needs in self defense training to do violence by hand.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 3:21 am

The moral imperative and the legal rule are fine for what they do—

one informs the decision process before the fact and the other helps society figure out how it feels about it after the fact.

It is the carrying over of the term to describe physical training and technique that is harmful.

Words mean things. A single word can connote entire constellations of meaning, in varying shades and intensities.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 3:23 am

When it comes to self defense training for physical action, we must choose the words we use to describe that action very carefully;

the more direct and concrete, the better. We need the words to conjure up a clear vision of that action that has you acting decisively.

“Self defense” as a descriptor for hand-to-hand combat is unfortunately vague.

It fails because it says nothing about the other guy, or you doing anything to him.

It mentions you, and protecting you. And that’s it. “Self defense” does not describe any direct action.

The popular narrative looks no further than the attacker/defender dichotomy.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 3:24 am

If you’re participating in self defense training and doing self defense, you’re automatically accepting the role of the defender.

In criminal violence, attackers are usually the “bad guys” and defenders the “good guys.”

No sane, social person wants to be a bad guy—we all want to be the good guy.

We want to have a good reason for doing what we must and be in the right after the fact. So we’ve picked sides. We venerate the doughty defender and vilify the animal attacker.

And in doing so we put our blinders on.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 3:27 am

Most videos of criminal violence involve an attacker savaging a victim.

Since we can’t identify with the attacker, we see ourselves as the guy on the ground getting stomped, stabbed, shot, whatever’s happening to him at the moment.

We then desperately try to come up with a plan to prevent those things from happening, all the while ignoring what the bad guy’s doing.

This is training for second place.

And all because we picked a role with the language we chose to describe our actions.

It is far more useful to replace the attacker/defender dichotomy with the idea of winners and losers.

In every successful use of violence, there will be at least one winner and one loser. Instead of identifying with the loser and looking to them for answers, we need to figure out what the winner is doing.

Why did he win? How can I do what he did? What mistakes did he make? How can I improve on his process?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 3:29 am


Of course, we have to step outside what is socially acceptable to see it from this perspective. No one wants to venerate the bad guys or take on the mantle of the evil-doer.

But when you stop painting black hats and white hats on the people in the situation and look purely at the mechanics of success in violence it becomes clear that it is easier to win than to fulfill the various needs of self defense.


Words dictate how we think, and how we think directly dictates how we move.

Don’t “defend yourself.” Hurt him.

Don’t participate in “self defense training.” Practice using violence as a survival tool.


Leave self defense where it’s best suited, in the realm of ideas, where it bookends the act of violence as the moral imperative to not use force needlessly and for legal consideration after the fact.

That’s why I don’t do, practice or teach “self defense.” I’ve spent my career figuring out why the winners win in violence and how to teach anyone who’ll listen how to do what they do.


In hand-to-hand violence, defense gets you killed. Hurting people gets you home.

The difference starts with mere words.



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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 3:43 am

Michael Walton

Let’s not forget “intent”. If one is in court describing one’s actions to the judge/jury, one will surely be better off describing one’s actions as “self-defense” rather than “I meant to hurt him”.

Not only should one’s explanation fit the “self-defense” definition, one’s actions should as well.

If the bad-guy punched me once, and I put him in the hospital, I’ll have a difficult time with the “self-defense” defense.


I would think the word 'self defense' implies the 'hurting' of the attacker...or the stopping the attack by making the attacker unable to continue to hurt or kill you.

The concern is genuine over the words you internalize and then use under an interrogation by operant conditioning.

Being careful and judicious is the constant in training empty handed or with weapons.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 6:35 am

Phil Rasmussen


Tim, I’ve taught martial arts for over 50 years and retired from the military with 30 years of service. Your article is right on in terms of how the “defender” thinks.

Unfortunately the public, especially in court, doesn’t like the terms winner and looser. They prefer “self defense” and the law unfortunately sides with that term.

When teaching “defense” courses, I prefer the terms initiator and protector.

Thus the attacker becomes the initiator and is more easily charged with assault in its various forms, while protector in LEO minds becomes the defender operating out of “self defense.”

I also believe that protector takes on more meaning in that it is not “related” to the degree of knowledge or skill one has.

If you say self defense, the question of your training comes into play and may end up as “excessive force,” especially if you have a black belt or higher.

Phil


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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 7:07 am

The legal issue is easy: “He attacked me. I want him charged, and will cooperate with the District Attorney to provide testimony.” Speak only about what he did and keep repeating that you want him arrested and charged.

Should it become necessary to say anything else, let your attorney handle it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 12, 2019 10:59 pm

Road Rage: A No-Win Scenario for Concealed Carriers

By Shawn Vincent | July 12th, 2019

Keith Byrne, a 41-year-old father of three, was on the phone with a friend while driving his utility truck in Davie, Florida. While on the phone, Byrne inadvertently cut-off a blue BMW driven by 22-year-old Andre Sinclair. When the two vehicles stopped at a red light, Byrne rolled down his window, reportedly to apologize. The friend on the phone claimed to hear Byrne say “my bad” before the call disconnected.

According to Sgt. Mark Leone of the Davie Police Department, Sinclair exited his BMW ,armed with a gun, and approached Byrne’s truck.

Byrne, a Marine veteran, was also armed, and a shootout ensued. Byrne took a bullet to the chest and died at the scene. Sinclair was taken to a hospital where he died of his wounds.

Although Byrne died, police determined he fired justifiably in self-defense, and they designated Sinclair the primary aggressor, noting Sinclair would have been charged with murder had he survived.

Don West, criminal defense attorney and National Trial Counsel for CCW Safe, has spoken to countless CCW Safe members about their experiences, and in his opinion, road rage incidents may be the most common life-threatening scenarios that concealed carriers can encounter.

“It goes from zero to a hundred in seconds,” West says. “It goes from people just driving down the road to a potential deadly encounter.”

One of the difficulties with road rage situations is that tempers are high, and there are no easy ways to de-escalate. If it’s true that Byrne rolled down his window to apologize, it’s likely the Sinclair interpreted the attempt to engage as an escalation of the conflict.


In our series “The Four Elements of Self-Defense,” we explored the Ronald Gasser case out of New Orleans. Gasser and Joe McKnight got into a road rage incident that lasted for miles and came to a head at a busy intersection.

Gasser’s window was rolled down. McKnight exited his vehicle and approached Gasser’s truck. When McKnight leaned into the window to talk, Gasser felt threatened and fired three fatal shots. McKnight was unarmed, and Gasser was convicted of murder.

Zero to a hundred in seconds.

In the Byrne shooting, St. Leone warned drivers in road rage scenarios to “just leave the area, even if you have to turn on a different street.”


Don West agrees. He recalls a story told to him by a CCW Safe member.

After a perceived traffic insult, a driver started aggressively following the member -- for miles. Eventually, in a relatively remote area, the aggressive driver passed, stopped at an intersection, and got out of his car.

Rather than engage, the CCW Safe member put his truck in reverse and backed up 100 yards. The other driver got the message: he wasn’t going to engage. The driver got back into his vehicle and left the scene. Nobody died. Nobody went to jail.


“If someone gets out of their car and comes toward you,” Don West says, “you know it’s not good. There’s no good way to address the situation other than to just get away.”


The lesson for concealed carriers is that a road rage incident is a no-win scenario. it escalates quickly, and efforts to deescalate can be easily misinterpreted as aggression.

When a gun is introduced into a heated exchange, things can turn deadly very quickly.

If you carry a weapon, you have a responsibility to avoid situations -- if you can safely do so -- where you might have to use it.

“You have to discipline yourself not to engage,” Don West says, “no matter how right or wrong you are.”
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 13, 2019 3:33 am

Rick Wilson »

The demonstrations, and most Uechi guys including myself have done the conditioning demonstration, are just a “show” for the crowds they have very little to do with then real training.

If you condition to be invincible in a real assault then you are bound to be rudely disappointed.

If you condition so you can take a hit to give one in a real assault then you bound to be rudely disappointed.

If you think your martial art is all about being conditioned to take a hit then you bound to be rudely disappointed.

If you think you will never be hit in a real assault then you bound to be rudely disappointed.

If you train to not get hit then you have more chance of doing it than if you did not train for it.

If you train to be able to continue to fight when you do get hit then you have more chance of doing it than if you did not train for it

If you condition so that you can then lay your toughness on top of having trained your body to still respond aggressively even when hit then you have more chance of doing it than if you did not train for it

If you condition to train your mind that you can get hit in a real assault and carry on then you have more chance of doing it than if you did not train for it

If you condition to train your body to recover more quickly when struck then you have more chance of doing it than if you did not train for it

Be prepared doesn’t mean it WILL work, just that it might.

However, you must vary your conditioning in many ways beginning with static and then as moving and then without being prepared for where you are going to be hit.

Conditioning is but one tool.

It is true that for a real assault you cannot prepare to be hit everywhere, or to take a real stab in the eye, or any stab for that matter, but it trains mental toughness and many parts of the body that are often hit.

One could as easily say that in a real assault you could be hit in the back of the head with a 2x4 and never see the blow that kills you so why bother with all this martial arts training?

The fact is we try to prepare ourselves as best we can and everyone has their own view of that.

Conditioning is a tool I choose to have.

I work far more on avoiding getting hit and reading an attack to pre-empt it than I do conditioning because they are my preferred responses.

Chen Man Ching was asked why he conditioned and his response was that often in a real assault the first indication you have that it is happening is that you are struck.

Be prepared but don't be fooled.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 13, 2019 3:37 am

RA Miller »

I'm more in line with what Rick said. The original essay read like someone who found a hole in their own training and had to come up with an excuse fast for why it really wasn't a hole.

You can get used to impact. When you start judo, you will be bruised and swollen. Your hands will be tender from slapping the mat. In a fairly short time, the swelling won't happen any more, what little pain there is you easily ignore.

Muscle is armor to impact strikes. The conditioned versus unconditioned stomach has already been brought up. Possibly more importantly (and something the Uechika I have seen excell at, whether they see it or not) is that most strikes to the head are effective because of the victim's weak neck or lack of skill in how to 'set' the head and take shots.

Conditioning may not work againts a gun or a knife (though the difference between curling up and dying and continuing to fight is a matter of mental conditioning and that mental conditioning is bred in the practice of moving through impact). But if you take that as an argument when conditioning gives you a solid edge against fist, boots and even 2x4s you are still sticking your head in the sand.

Last thing- a lot of the effects of strikes are psychological. Physically, the human body is a tough machine- you would have to break every long bone in the body, sever the spine, or shut down the brain stem to physically stop someone from attacking.

Most stop attacking when they give up- some to pain, some from injury ("my knee snapped, I don't have a chance now, maybe I should just quit") but most to conditioning.

Even if there was no physical advantage to conditioning, given that almost everyone who is beaten is beaten mentally, conditioning again becomes a big edge.

FWIW,
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 13, 2019 3:43 am

When you think your training has made you safe...the blade suddenly materializes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PWmRWjDhYw
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Rick Wilson » Sat Jul 13, 2019 6:13 am

You are right, Van a knife changes things, if you have never trained against one, then it may be a rude and tragic awakening to face one.

Well clearly, I feel this way because I wrote a book on it and I was set off on my study because I found how different it was and it was not as easy as you would think because we’d been “trained.”

Regardless of what you use to train to prepare for a knife I suggest two other bits of training.

Create a safe training knife (I simply fold a gi belt over three times to the right length, cut it off and then wrap in duct tape.) With a safe training knife, you can put the kind of commitment into a stab most Aggressors do. That commitment gets rid of the error thinking a defence was successful when really your training partner pulled the attack. It also gives you the incoming energy that most real assaults have.

I also recommend when doing alive training (not prearranged) everyone has a safe training knife on them and when portraying the bad guy (the Aggressor), they can deploy it at anytime during the simulation. They don’t start with it deployed but pull it at some point when in close or clinching.

I find that the first time or two the person the Aggressor was facing didn’t know they were now being struck with a knife and not empty hand BUT after that couple of times they recognized the feel of the body when the Aggressor reaches for the weapon. Never any guarantees when dealing with a knife but we can up our percentage chances for survival.

Saying you should always be prepared for a weapon is very different than needing to be in training for one. :)
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