Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed May 20, 2020 3:48 pm

The matter of self-defense is a serious one, and the discipline of preparing for any contingency requires full-time study, research, training, and professional commitment. You cannot have “a sport, a classical system, a fitness program, and a practical method of self-protection” in one and the same art.

All you end up with if you attempt it, is a watered down, so-so approach to close combat that might be effective in some cases, but that certainly cannot be relied upon across the board to manage physical combat under any conditions, anywhere.

Over the years some people have chosen to misrepresent that which has been my adamant stand for many decades: Namely, that combat and competition or classicism are not the same, and that one cannot properly prepare for one by training in another.

Misconstruing my position as being “against” sport or “against” classical/traditional arts, some critics have insisted that I am opposed to schools and teachers that advocate these most popular forms of martial arts studies. That is most assuredly not true.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed May 20, 2020 3:49 pm

I am no more against sporting/competitive martial arts than is an electrical engineer against aeronautical engineering. I am merely insistent upon the fact that a difference exists between the two disciplines.

And, I further insist, that anyone whose goal is to excel in one of those areas of martial practice should find a school and teacher whose total focus is upon that specific area.

I respect sporting/competitive and classical/traditional studies. They offer immense benefits to those who participate in them, and they are both deservedly popular.

However, the art of self-defense and close combat is a separate and specific study, and anyone wishing to become fully confident and physically adept in real world combative skills needs to find a teacher whose total emphasis is on that subject.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed May 20, 2020 3:51 pm

“But were not all of the classical/traditional arts — in their origins — intended 100% for actual combat?” one might wish to ask.

The answer is “Yes. In their origins all of the martial arts were, in fact, martial in their design, organization, spirit, and intention. However, the classical/traditional arts were formulated many hundreds, even thousands, of years ago.

Cultural idiosyncrasies, manners of dress, levels of sophistication regarding combat techniques amongst the general populace, weapons commonly used and carried, and traditions governing how individuals fought when they met in battle, all influenced and greatly affected what the arts contained and how they were taught.

Many of those things that made sense 1,000 years ago, or several hundred years ago, make no sense today, and are absolutely inapplicable to the modern fighting man, or to the private citizen who requires an effective means of self-defense.

Because of this, the classical/traditional arts, worthwhile as they are as arts, offer at best only a partial adaptability of that which they teach for practical close combat and personal protection in the modern world.

And this is true only of those who have applied themselves to a serious study of these arts for many years. These arts do not offer the person who wants and who needs a fully functional, no-nonsense readily learnable and retainable method of individual combat that which he seeks.”
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed May 20, 2020 3:53 pm

Points to ponder

Steiner
IT BEGINS WITH MINDSET

THE mental conditioning required for personal combat bears no relation to the mental conditioning required for sport or for classical training. Frankly and bluntly, what a person who wishes to be fully prepared to defend himself requires is the ability to shift to a war footing, and to do so instantly and without a fraction of a second’s hesitation.

He must be able to turn vicious, destructive, aggressive, violent, offensive, and relentlessly determined to destroy his enemy. People may not like to hear it put that way, but that is the way it is.

Speak to any military man who has been in a close combat situation. Or speak to a police officer who has had to fight for his life against a violent felon. Or — speak to anyone who has been victimized by violent criminals.

The art of training and conditioning the mind is one that a professional close combat and self-defense teacher must possess. He must know exactly what a properly combat-conditioned mind requires, and he must be able to impart that to his students.

I am not at all shy about proclaiming that I have pioneered this field, and as a professional teacher and hypnotherapist have developed definite and very effective ways to bring any serious and willing student to the right frame of mind for dealing with deadly violence.

American Combato is the premier art to recognize this need, and the first to have established doctrine by which the need can be reliably satisfied through training.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed May 20, 2020 3:56 pm

Steiner
AND DEPENDS UPON DANGEROUS

OFFENSIVE SKILLS

THE purpose of a quality self-defense system is to enable the user to save his life, protect anyone dear to him, and to do so with the most reliable and efficient techniques and tactics possible.

The history of combat throughout man’s existence on earth has demonstrated without question what works in real hand-to-hand and close quarters battle: The most ruthlessly foul, vicious, underhanded, and dangerously destructive techniques.

When the battle is a sporting contest grappling often tends to prevail over methods of hitting. However, when the fight is for real, the opposite is true; and while some very few grappling methods are a part of serious hand-to-hand combat, fully 90-95% of the curriculum consists of blows, gouges, jabs, smashes, butts, stomps, biting, kicking, kneeing, clawing, grasping and tearing.

These actions are fastest in a real affray, and they cause instant disorientation when applied . . . permitting the user to followup and to follow through with savage fury.

Attacking is critical in self-defense. This does not mean starting fights or initiating trouble. It does mean carrying the war into the enemy’s camp and becoming the aggressor once you have been attacked.

So long as you are “defending” you are losing; so long as you are attacking, you are winning!

The close combat and self-defense specialist emphasizes supreme aggressiveness — “attack mindedness” as it was referred to during WWII —

and if he is a real pro he will train you to seize the initiative, surprise your attacker, and wreck him completely before he even realizes what is happening.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed May 20, 2020 3:57 pm

Steiner
Quality self-defense training instills the ability to attack by surprise, giving nothing away by assuming any “fighting stance” or posture. Severe injury, speedily inflicted . . . that’s the watchword when dealing with an unavoidable, violent offender.

Great followup and continuous attack is emphasized in a quality program, and the trainee is taught to expect to get hurt, to anticipate weapons, multiple attackers, murderous intent on the part of his assailant, and his assailant’s superior physical ability.

No mention of “secrets”, “hidden techniques”, “mystical powers”, or the possibility of acquiring “guaranteed methods”. Just heavy, heavy doses of reality, and techniques that has been proven in war to really work, comprise the last of learning, when studying with a true self-defense specialist.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed May 20, 2020 3:59 pm

Steiner
BACKED UP WITH GOOD COUNTERATTACKING

METHODS


A quality program of close combat and self-defense will include methods of handling attacks that have caught the defender off guard. In many systems of classical/traditional training these are referred to as “self-defense techniques”.

Almost without exception they are complex, impractical (though visually impressive) and impossible to rely upon in a real emergency. However, in a quality combat system these techniques are exceedingly simple, practical, and very destructive.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat May 23, 2020 9:56 pm

Here is a good article about what to expect if someone pulls a knife on you.

In the papers we read that the covid pandemic has caused a big spike in violent behavior in people with lots of anger...we even saw some ass wipe trip a police officer running/responding to a crime scene...people are carrying more weapons and using them in confrontations. You as a martial artist, who always sort of lamented a chance to prove how tough karate has made you...are about to get your wish.


https://www.randykinglive.com/the-least ... fe-defense


1.Systematization is rough to use under stress. You need habit and ritual to help you survive a life-threatening encounter, so being athletic and mobile is more helpful than even the best knife defense, since you most likely will not even see the blade.

2.If you don’t have solid operant conditioning to negative stimulus, you may be starting the encounter with a stab wound you might not even realize you have. That is dangerous – and as my friend Dillon Beyer always says, “Dying second is not winning” (more on this in a future blog).

3.I survived all my encounters through luck. Training did not pop in – not because training is wrong, but because the way we train knife defense is wrong; the attack indicators are wrong, the range is wrong, the energy is wrong.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat May 23, 2020 9:57 pm

Using what we have above, we need to understand that the fundamental training is often incorrect or incomplete. When it comes to knife defense, there are three major types of situations you must be able to deal with. (Don’t believe me? Hit up the YouTubes! Fact-check everything!)

1.Knife in motion: the person is aggressively coming at you, which means you and they are in motion.

2.Knife is static: the knife is a part of the conversation; they are using it as a very convincing negotiation piece. It is usually touching your flesh.

3.Knife is deployed during the encounter: In far more situations than you think the knife is produced during the fight, not at the beginning. .
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat May 23, 2020 10:00 pm

In this blog, let’s focus on number 3, where the knife is deployed mid-encounter. I get a lot of blowback when I talk about this in seminars. It blows peoples minds that a weapon would not be in use right from the get-go.

The reason that people have trouble with this concept is because they are looking at knife violence like an action movie. They think that every single attacker is an ex-con former Navy SEAL with a personal grudge against them, so every fight is a fight to the death. That is simply not the case for most civilians.

Seriously, if you follow four simple rules you can probably go your entire life without seeing a knife in combat:

Don’t get a job where you tell the public “No”

Don’t join and/or betray a violent group

Only sleep with people you have permission to sleep with

Don’t be a dick in places where 14-to-24-year-old humans get their minds altered
Bam!

Knife defense level expert achieved! (Just send me 500 dollars now and 500 annually and I will send you a new certificate every year so you can prove to people just how safe you are…)
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat May 23, 2020 10:01 pm

Now if you do end up in an encounter and the person has a knife, there is only one type of situation in which they are guaranteed to pull it. Why might they not immediately use it?

Well, if it is not personal, and you are not a threat, there is no reason to risk the jail time for using a weapon. People do not pick fights they are going to lose for free.

If a person is harassing you, and they are not using the blade to convince you, it may never come out at all. We tossed so many people out of the bar that had knives in their pockets.

Guess what – if you don’t train under stress to draw, you don’t tend to realize it is an option.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat May 23, 2020 10:03 pm

“But Randy, you said there was only one situation in which a knife is guaranteed to be produced if it is present! What situation is that?”

Great question, random internet reader! The answer is, a situation where the person attacking is losing grievously. That’s right – being too good at kicking people’s asses tends to make them use higher levels of force on you. So if your attacker underestimated you, they might scale up the attack to make sure they are successful.

When I was stabbed the second time, the knife was not deployed until about 35 seconds in, and when it isn’t present at the beginning you will rarely see it during. I survived by luck, blind luck. The old FMA adage is true – when deployment happens mid-fight, at this time the knife is felt not seen.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat May 23, 2020 10:03 pm

So, how are you training? Do you have play and sensitivity drills that teaches you what it feels like when a person reaches for a weapon? Hell, in the knife story I used here, the person dropped his weapon after stabbing me; when he went to reach for it I read that as him wanting to wrestle me.

If you liked this, share this – and stay tuned for my next blog “The Myth of Knife Defense” coming in a few weeks.


Randy King
@randykinglive
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 24, 2020 2:33 pm

Randy King
Running off a purely physical mentality when talking about self defense is dangerous for your clients. Why, you ask? Let’s use the sports world as an example. Pro fighters have weight classes, and one of the biggest accomplishments that a pro fighter can have is to hold a title in two weight classes.

In fact, some professionals won’t take a fight if the opponent has even a 5 pound advantage. Seriously - some pros won’t even give up a single pound, to the point that it is considered unprofessional to not “make weight”, and even if the fight goes on, the heavy fighter is punished (through loss of money or belt contention).

What does this tell us? It tells us that size and strength make a difference, even at the highest level. In self protection, we don’t get to pick the size, experience, or tactical preference of our attacker - this is an advantage held by the aggressor, they decide and we must react.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun May 24, 2020 2:37 pm

If you are giving up 100lbs in a fight- something no pro fighter (outside exhibition) would ever do by choice - then relying solely on physical skills is ludicrous. We need to teach realistically and allow our clients to use more. We need to understand ALL the factors of self defense.

Sadly, self defense training usually places you in the worst possible spot first and then has you work your way out of it, again looking at a moment in time and not the whole picture. “How did I end up here?” is a question that should also be asked by every client.

If you are not allowed to train ways to just not end up in that spot, then the technique mentality is stifling your self defense abilities.

Seriously - ask any high-level grappling coach worth their salt how to best escape a sunk-in rear naked choke, and the answer is usually either don’t be there in the first place, or tap before it goes dark. We need to get this approach into the self defense world!
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 56712
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

PreviousNext

Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest