Book Recommendations

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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Sun Sep 06, 2020 7:58 pm

Book Recommendations Part 16: And Now for Something Completely Different

This next book is different, and I will admit it may not be to everyone’s liking. It is the opposite to a book on techniques clearly described and illustrated, it is a book with no techniques and a book that the first read may not seem to be clearly described or illustrated. And that makes this a real shift from my last recommendation or in the words of a great British comedy – And now for something completely different.

I can’t recall the first time I read this book but it had to be close to when it was first published and I think about half way through I put it down not sure if the author didn’t know what he was talking about or if I didn’t know what the author was talking about. Turns out it was me.

The book is: “Cheng Hsin: The Principles of Effortless Power” by Peter Ralston.

The book is one of principles and not application. It begins with the five principles of Cheng Hsin – the five principles of an effortlessly effective body being. The book goes into detail on body being, body awareness and many other things.

Ralston is not the clearest of writers so you have to work at understanding what he means and for some that may put them off but I feel deep contemplation is where deep learning takes place and this book always put me into deep contemplation. I have read the book numerous times since I first got it and each time, I find new things or a new awareness.

As I said reading it takes work. In fact, some found it difficult enough to comprehend that Peter Ralston and his wife Laura Ralston created a simpler version to try and get much of the body being information across: “Zen Body- Being: An Enlightened Approach to Physical Skill, Grace and Power.” Not the same but in essence very similar, in fact Laura Ralston in the foreword refers to that book as “a simple, pared-down version of his body-being work. A useful little book.” Now his body-being work encompasses more than Cheng Hsin but you can get the drift that at times his written communication can take work. That book is also excellent but oddly I prefer Cheng Hsin and I believe it is because it makes me think more. I don't want it handed to me I want to earn it.

Isn’t that a real recommendation – this book will take a great deal of work. Well, yes because like all things that take a great deal of work – they are worth it. Now I don’t know where you are on your martial journey so perhaps you are coming in when I first picked up this book or at the second time or fifth or tenth or twentieth and that will determine your experience reading this book.

Some may get a great deal their first read through, others may end up asking themselves if I was nuts to recommend it. In either case finish the book and then pick it up and read it again in a year or two and see if there is a different grasping of what he is telling us.

It was this book that confirmed for me decades ago that the focused tension at the end of a strike that I was taught in Karate was wrong. Tension stops power so why would we want to stop our power from coming out in a strike? As my Buddy Rick Bottomley said – no where in the force equation does it say stop.

The bottom-line is I have read this book so many times and I keep getting more each time. I really love it. You may or may not or may in a year or two depending on if you like to learn through contemplation.

I highly recommend this book, but you may have to give it time.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby paulg » Mon Sep 07, 2020 10:06 am

The factor of full-body focus is certainly a cherished idea in karate. I had innocently and naively commented on the proper moment of focus at a class at the Hut last year and was surprised, gobsmacked really, to find there was disagreement on this topic. Something I had taken for granted since my first week of karate study so many years ago was not universally understood or agreed upon. That is; that the focus occurs at the full extension of the strike. Others thought that it occurs at the point of contact with the target, or just an inch beyond contact. What understanding of this do others have?
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Mon Sep 07, 2020 7:50 pm

I can only say what I think and do.

I have no intention of saying what other should do.

My posting here is at the request to post what people think not to get into any argument or to tick anyone off. I do what I do because I can prove to myself the effectiveness of it.

The question I have is why does full body focus mean tension?

We focus totally on projecting the force as far along and out the strike as possible. We focus everything on delivering the full power out of the strike. We have that pin head size point were are striking through (not to) as our focus. I don't see the need for tension anywhere in that.

I see tension grabbing and stopping my strike. It looks and feels like focus when performing a Kata but I no longer see it as full body focus - once again I repeat please feel free to disagree and strike as you wish.

I don't believe a strike (or any movement) requires tension any more that the full body focus of a baseball pitcher requires tension and yet there is a great deal of focus at the end of a pitch.

Remember this is just how I see and do things. Feel free to disagree and do things as you see best.

I believe in using the natural elasticity of the body and I use that to rebound and retract the strike. If I tense at the end then I shut down that elasticity and no longer can access that now free power and then I have to use just muscle to retract the strike.

I believe that there is more penetration without tension. Try this and see if you find what I find you may not.

1. Get close to a wall but not close enough to hit it with a strike.

2. Throw a Sanchin strike (or punch) to your normal extension with the tension at the end and hold that position.

3. Holding the arm in that position move so your fingers or fist touch the wall.

DO THIS SLOWLY I HAVE HAD PEOPLE NOT LISTEN TO THAT AND INJURE THEIR FINGERS.

4. Slowly do another Sanchin strike (or punch) BUT stay totally loose - reach out as far as your am will extend being loose with the strike - as far as you can go (stretch everything) - no tension in legs, back, shoulders, arms, hand and see if the strike would have gone farther....

More penetration can mean more power.

The last thing is I don't strike an inch beyond contact (Not that Paul said he did.) - I strike to the wall behind a person or the horizon. I don't pay attention to the point of contact I strike as far through the person as I can. I believe full extension can only come without tension.

That is just how I do and to throw something else out there I don't tense my fist when I hit with one either.... yeah and I have hit a Makiwara thousands of times and never hurt my hand. Alignment over tension.

Sometimes we have to test out what we believe to be true. Sometimes we go "yep that's true" and sometime we go "well heck?"

Uechi people will appreciate this - when I studied TKD a number of decades ago I was told if I kicked a person with my toes I would break them - then I when I trained Uechi..... no broken toes so far.

That is my understanding and thoughts for what it is worth.

I believe in Kime or focus on a strike but I don't believe focus requires tension. I have been watching pitchers a little looking a their mechanics and I see an almost laser focus on where that pitch is going and they release everything into that pitch at that point - total focus as I see it but no tension. I see they have Kime.

At least that is just how i see it.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby paulg » Tue Sep 08, 2020 9:59 am

Thank you so much, Rick, for your response. This is exactly the kind of discussion I was hoping for.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Tue Sep 08, 2020 3:39 pm

Book Recommendations Part 17: Yes, Reality Folks you can learn from this.

I know many of the reality based self defence folk have a dismissive attitude for Aikido because it lacks realistic attacks. The attacks in Aikido represent lines of force but there is truth to the fact they don’t look much like real assaults; however, there is a lot to be learned from Aikido.

And on that I recommend: “Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere: An illustrated Introduction” BY A. Westbrook and O. Ratti (Illustrations by O. Ratti)

There are other good Aikido books but I think this one goes into the principles better than most. Most give a history of the founder and Aikido then go into techniques. This book does have at the beginning the philosophy, ranking etc. but they don’t spend a lot of time on it.

As for the usefulness of it I recall having a VHS tape series (yes, I am old) by a police officer showing how he used Aikido in his law enforcement practice. Like all martial arts they were devised for self defence and can be used for that when applied properly.

But the truth is I don’t care if Aikido can be used for self defence (it can) because many of the principles they use can be applied regardless of your style or system.

I wrote and entire book called “Now You See It, Now You Don’t” on using empty space for self defence and I see Aikido as one of the two styles I believe make the best use of empty space (BJJ is the other.) I love watching good Aikido for the beauty and utility of their use of empty space.

I do have to say that there will always be a section on Ki (chi or qi) in a book on Aikido and that too throws off many but if you think of their description of Ki not of some energy force but as a way to visualize the use of your intent or the intent of the Aggressor then you can find a practical use.

Once their principles are covered as always, they will head into techniques and for me the actual technique is immaterial to their movement and use of empty space. That is where the true value lies and how you can take those principles or the under lying engine and use them in your own way. This is the great value I see in Aikido and why I think it is a value in looking at this practice. Much can be learned.

A final word or two. I know in Aikido there is often a wrist grab and people criticize them for this as well saying they are uncommon and they would just let go. I can’t say they are common but then I know in grappling you work of wrist control…. As for letting go – no you won’t and historically for Aikido you sure would not. Why won’t you let go? Why did you grab them? You grabbed them to hang on and if you are really trying to hang on to control them then the move is over before you think of letting go. I’ve done this to people telling them to not let go don’t go hang on tight then…. It is over. The other thing to remember (this comes from Rick Bottomley) is that Aikido comes from Jujitsu which was a battlefield system so when they grabbed a person’s wrist to control them it was because they had lost their weapon and were grabbing the arm holding a sword or knife. Now if you have grabbed a arm holding a knife how quickly will you be letting go?

Once again don’t worry about the type of attack or the specific response to the attack, look for the underlying movements and principles and use of empty space and I believe you will find this something you can learn good things from.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Van Canna » Wed Sep 09, 2020 4:06 am

Rick,
Great stuff as usual, keep it coming. You are one of the very few teachers in existence who is well researched. :D
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Wed Sep 09, 2020 3:36 pm

Book Recommendations Part 18: Back to Reality

I did say I would probably do this again and I am, I am recommending a DVD rather than a book and yes, it is Rory Miller again, this time his video “Logic of Violence: Think Like A Criminal.”

I thought I would drop back to very real for this post and Rory is as real as it gets. When we study self defence, we are preparing for a violent encounter, to survive it. Surviving can take many forms from avoidance to physical confrontation to the court room.

I have said this before but it deserves repeating, to prepare to survive a violent encounter we need to study violence and study it will some real depth and thought. Luckily Rory has done a lot of the work for us and we just need to take part and absorb.

I have done Rory’s session on the Logic of Violence a few times and each time I learn more and I learned more watching the video of the session. It is an excellent session.

The back of the DVD covers the topics well:

1. Learn the difference between various predator types.
2. Analyze common assault examples and learn how to avoid them.
3. Understand “Emotional Dominance” and “Your Nightmare opponent.”
4. Recognize the glitches in your own thinking.
5. Eliminate mental issues that can hinder reaction speed during a real-life assault.
6. Recognize the types of violence and the places where violence occurs most frequently.

I love this note also on the back of the DVD: “Violence has its own indisputable logic. Criminals resort to violence because it works, and they avoid violence when the cost seems too high.”

The study of self defence should include a study of violence and the criminals who use it to get what they want.

As instructors we cannot know everything, and that is where we are helped by others who share what they know.

I highly recommend taking Rory’s seminar on this but if you do not have that opportunity then get this DVD. In fact, get it even if you do there are always slightly different things discussed.

Thank you, Rory Miller, for sharing.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Van Canna » Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:43 am

Rick
I have said this before but it deserves repeating, to prepare to survive a violent encounter we need to study violence and study it will some real depth and thought. Luckily Rory has done a lot of the work for us and we just need to take part and absorb.


Indeed. At most, if at all, without getting deep into the study of what Rory has brought us from the real world of violence_ we will be left with a physical tool box that even as 'effective' in some practitioners, is, in the end, a ticket to prison and or financial destruction.

In some of my cases that I investigated, I still remember the befuddled expression on some successful 'defenders' when receiving a lien on their homes. It is a time when you want to fill up a thrash bag with your karate skills and personally kick it in a dumpster.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Thu Sep 10, 2020 3:52 pm

Book Recommendations Part 19: Walking the Path previous Masters have walked

Stepping away from the reality base I want to look at a piece of writing that I have enjoyed and learned from. We can learn a lot from old martial arts masters and there will be a few of those in my recommendations.

I am recommending: “Miyamoto Musashi: His Life and Writings” by Kenji Tokitsu.

I think most people have heard of Musashi’s “Book of Five Rings” (Gorin no Sho) or “Writings on the Five Elements” and I have read a number of different translations and sometime interpretations, but this book gives so much more.

To understand the “Book of Five Rings” we need to have context, such as that it was never meant for you and me to read it. It was written for Musashi’s students and they were to destroy it after they had read it. As it was written for his students it was not meant as an instruction manual. Musashi could make a reference in a few words and his students had years of teaching to know what that reference meant where we just have that reference. Which can make the writing seem unfinished where in fact it was finished – just not for us.

There are also many things that will resonate and some surprising such as even back then there were “McDojos” and Musashi has a few words for them and not polite ones.

This book gives as accurate a picture as it can of Musashi’s life. I say as accurate as it can because the author will present two or more versions of what may have happened or what Musashi may have done and then look for the most logical one.

As much fun as reading about his life this book also includes writings prior to the Book of Five Rings that I had never seen or read.

There is very good discussion of translation as well because translating is difficult and even more difficult when it is a technical subject being translated. There will be parts where the translation is discussed and explained as to why a particular translation was used. I found this very interesting.

All this is nice of course but the real benefit is the meat of the material itself and looking back into the mind of a sword master. Fascinating stuff.

I would call this a very scholarly work with a great deal of research and effort having gone into producing it.

There is so much more which makes this a truly interesting study of an interesting man.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby paulg » Fri Sep 11, 2020 10:47 am

Regarding Aikido (above post) I recall reading somewhere that Ueshiba, the Founder, was a jujitsu practioner who made up aikido as a supplementary set of exercises to teach his students the concept of flow and harmony. They liked it so much that it eventually morphed into an art in itself, but it was not initially meant to be a stand-alone martial art.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:52 pm

Aikido:

This is just based on what I have read.

I think that many arts do not begin by expecting to be created. Like many a person begins to train and at some point, diverges from the path of that art or arts until they are doing something that may be unique enough to be called something different.

When we look back, or rather when others look back, and write the histories then sometimes, they get altered or prettied up or simply become muddled in legend. Sometimes, they are also heightened to increase value.

I think for Aikido you could say that Ueshiba O’Sensei did not set out to form a separate style of martial art but at a certain point he definitely made a decision and was creating one first calling it Aiki-jutsu then Aikido.

According to “Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere” Ueshiba studied:

Jujutsu – Kito School, under Master Tokusaburo Tojawa (1901)
Fencing (Kenjutsu) – Yagu School, under Master Masakatsu Nakai (1903)
Jujutsu – Daito School, under Master Sakaku Takeda (1911 – 1916)
Spear Fighting – (1924) (My note - he adapted this to the use of a bayonet during the war.)

Religious studies:

Zen under Priest Fujimoto of the Shingon School of Buddihisn at the Jizo-ji (1890 – 1893)
Deeply involved with the religious school of Omoto-kyo founded by Reve, Wanisburo Deguchi to the extend he participated in the promotion of the sect in Korea, China and Manchuria. (A major influence.)

The book notes 1925 as the year Ueshiba noted his dissatisfaction and began searching for a deeper meaning to be attributed to the martial arts.

I see his blending of his martial training and his religious or spiritual beliefs as when he began to form something different.

Technique wise I see the greatest influence is by Daito-Ryu.

I haven’t seen that Aikido was created by exercises he added.

I think the foundations of much of what they do in Aikido can be seen in Daito-Ryu. Where the shift came would be in his spiritual beliefs and he definitely had some interesting beliefs and experiences that influenced the formation of Aikido.

Keeping in mind the statements above about writing history a good book on his life is “A Life in Aikido: The Biography of Founder Moihei Ueshiba” by Kisshomaru Ueshiba (son of the founder.)

It is written by his son, so it pays homage to his father, but I think it also gives a clear insight into to founder and how he saw Aikido as a path to enlightenment. The book has many stories that give a window into the life and beliefs of Ueshiba O’Sensei.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Mon Sep 14, 2020 6:23 am

Book Recommendations Part 20: If you want to comment on a use of force by law enforcement – do it with some knowledge.

In 2012 Rory Miller published “Force Decisions A Citizen’s Guide: Understanding How Police Determine Appropriate Use of Force.”

I think this book is a must read for everyone especially today with all that is going on. There are other good use of force books but most of those I have seen are for the law enforcement officers (LEO.) This book is for the people who are not trained in use of force so that they can better evaluate what was done. They can then comment from a better-informed position.

Far too often today I see an almost lynch mob mentality when people see a clip of an officer using force. I am not saying every use of force is appropriate, but we need to examine the use of force with knowledge and with the facts not emotion. The facts need to be looked at and the entire encounter whenever possible. Again, too often there is just the one small segment that someone wants the public to see and not the entire encounter.

This book can provide knowledge on the use of force to citizens and allow people to make up their minds about a use of force. This book is not about changing people’s minds.

I am going to quote the introduction because Rory explains the purpose of the book far better than I could and I hope people commenting on uses of force get and read this book (available in print or ebook.)

Quote:

This book is a gift, a peace offering. It is an attempt to communicate across a vast gulf in culture and experience, the gulf that exists between Law Enforcement community and those whom they protect.

Each day, media outlets all over the country describe events where officers use force. Often the reporters and the citizens question the need for force at all or whether the type and amount of force used was really necessary. Citizens worry that their protectors – with badges, guns, clubs and Tasers – are caught up in the rush of power, or perhaps giving vent to anger or bigotry.

The officers are frustrated too. Specialist in dealing with a world this is sometimes very dark and very violent, they feel scrutinized. They feel as if their actions are constantly under a microscope, judged by a populace without any experience or training in a vey specialized field.

In this book, I want to show how officers think about force, not only how we are trained to think of it, but also how experience shapes our beliefs and attitudes.

If you are one of the people who believe officers are thugs and question each and every use of force, I don’t want to change you. Let me say that again; I don’t want to change you. Sometimes my job requires me to use force on behalf of society, on your behalf. That force should be subject to your scrutiny.

What I do want, if you have objections, is to have those objections based on facts not emotions. Most people will have a negative reaction to any violence, and some problems (from child-raising to the boardroom to politics and medicine and …) simply don’t have an answer that makes everyone comfortable.

You know what you saw or read. You know how that made you feel. The final data that you need to back up your reasonable objections are knowledge of the rules – to understand thoroughly the legal and policy limits as well as the tactical considerations that the professionals understand.

There are truths and perceptions that frame this gulf. First, the perceptions: We have all been taught that peace is an ideal, and that hurting people is wrong. We have been taught, in an egalitarian society, that what is wrong for one is wrong for all. And what is wrong to do to someone is wrong to do to anyone.

The truth, however, is harsh. It is this: The only defence against evil, violent people is good people who are more skilled at violence. Rory Miller.

End Quote

The Amazon page gives a nice brief look at what is in the book, but I think the introduction I quoted gives the best idea about what will be found in this great book. But to save you going and looking here is a little of what is in this useful book: the goals, threat levels, levels of force, factors and circumstances checks and balances, skills taught, experience and much much more.

I highly recommend it and if you get into a use of force discussions perhaps you can recommend this to others as well.

I also want to add an honourable mention, but this book is for law enforcement when they have to use their guns. I mention it because it could give the citizens a look into what LEO’s deal with when they have to use their weapons and the aftermath as well: “Deadly Force Encounters: What Cops Need to Know to Mentally and Physically Prepare for and Survive a Gunfight” by Dr. Alexis Artwohl and Loren W. Christensen.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:25 pm

Book Recommendations Part 21: A great collection of thoughts

My next book is one I acquired and read years ago and enjoyed greatly. Flipping through it now I can see why. You don’t have to agree with everything that is in this book, but each part will have you pondering.

The book is: “The Sword Polisher’s Record: The Way of Kung-Fu” By Adam Hsu and is it was “originally a monthly column that appeared for more than a decade in three magazines, including Kungfu magazine and Black Belt magazine.”

Even though it is a book on Kung-fu I found the ideas discussed apply to many styles and system Kung-fu or not Kung-fu.
As stated, this is a collection of monthly columns which means it has a variety of topics covered. The book is broken into parts:

1. Knocking on the Kung-fu door
2. The foundation of Kung-fu
3. Myth and Reality of Kung-fu styles
4. The role of forms in Kung-fu
5. Mind and Body training
6. The Soul of Kung-fu
7. Masters and Students
8. Kung-fu for Today and Tomorrow

I think this one is for those who want a broader view of martial arts. Certainly, there are helpful specific things, but I think there is a larger picture looked at as well. I know I enjoyed it, and in fact should set it up to reread.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Wed Sep 16, 2020 6:57 pm

Book Recommendations Part 22: Classics are things we can learn from

I have found a great deal can be learned from the body mechanics found in Taiji, they may not fit what you do if it is style specific but they are an interesting exploration regardless if you like to explore and learn.

In Taiji (Tai Chi) there are a number of “classics” written as guides to how to best perform. Some are clear and many others seem baffling. And oddly some make perfect sense only once you understand them.

It takes a good practitioner to give their interpretation of them. Reading different interpretations increase our understanding even if we disagree with what we read.

I think one of the best books for interpretations is: “Taijiquan – True to the Art” by Wee Kee Jin.

This book covers the main classics:

Chang San-Fen Yiji Classics
Wang Ts’ung-Yueh Taiji Classics
The Song of the Thirteen Postures
The Understanding of the Thirteen Postures
The Song of Tuishoa (Push Hands)
The Song of Substance and Function (By Cheng Man Ching)
Important Taiji Points from the Yang Family (For Yang Style Practitioners.


As I said some of the classic are clear, such as:

“At the moment of movement, the body should be light, agile and most importantly connected together (synchronized.)”

Some need thought:

“Up or down forwards and backwards, left or right, are all the same. All these are within the mind and not physically manifested.”

The book then goes into details on further study:

The Body of Taijiquan: “The form helps practitioners “cultivate the awareness of their body, the relaxation, the sinking process, and the relaxed force.”

The Application of Taijiquan: This deals with push hands getting into sticking, joining, adhering, following and listening.

The Art of partner work in Taijiquan: He clarifies that this is what people today call push hands but in the old days it was an exercise to sense and feel.


Fajin – The Discharging and Releasing of the Relaxed Force.

Yielding and Neutralising.

Taijiquan – the Art of Receiving. “The mind must ask, and the body must answer.”

The author ends with his personal Taiji journal and some stories from his teacher all very interesting and nice he put them at the back of the book rather than the start – my opinion.

The paperback version is not available and was really expensive but there are PDF versions available here: https://www.taijisoce.com/shop

It would be nice if someone help them convert this to ebook format and print versions on KDP.
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Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Thu Sep 17, 2020 5:17 pm

You can read the review or watch the video clip: https://youtu.be/ozKLvbEtXSw

This is Book Recommendations Part 23: Something new and a must have – Randy King’s New on-line Violence Foundations course
Yes, an on-line course I kind of broke the “just books” recommendations when I recommend Rory Miller’s DVDs.

I am highly recommending: “Realities of Violence Educational Foundations” by Randy King of KPC Self Defense here in Edmonton, Randy King Live and Talking to Savages.

I have said it before if you want to train for self defence then that requires a study of violence. There is a different violence dynamic when you are dealing with a group. A resource predator wants different things than a process predator. We need to look at what it is, why it is, how it happens and how that affects you – personally and legally. We can’t deal with something unless we know something about it and the more, we know the better equipped to deal with it we are.

Randy King’s has done a fantastic job creating this very professional quality course. The course is all about the soft skills of self defence, a study of violence realities, which means the stuff we should know beyond the physical conflict. Beyond that really fun stuff we all love to focus training on. Because it is not the physical stuff that means this course is not style or system specific.

The course is broken out into seven modules and each module is broken up into small manageable pieces which I found very useful because when I got a free moment, I could complete a section and then go look after other things. The pieces are short but densely packed with information. I loved the progression of information and the logic of it. I liked Randy included video clips of real violence which helped solidify the knowledge being shared.

I believe this course is for everyone.

You may a long-time practitioner and are comfortable with your knowledge and skill level. But even if you have a comfortable level of knowledge in violence this course has the most current information I have come across. It can add to what you know, it can reinforce what you know. It can update what you know.

If you are training a traditional martial art or at a self defence school or an MMA facility and you love the training, but they are not covering this much needed material on the realities of violence. You can cover this vital material without having to change where you love to train.

As an instructor we need to accept that no one person can know all aspects of self defence. The soft skills of violence foundations may not be part of your traditional style or system curriculum, or your research focus. Now it doesn’t have to. This course can give you a solid foundation in Violence Foundations and that may enrich what you are already teaching. You can recommend this course to your students, so they get your great training and this great training. You my even want to take it a step farther and make this course mandatory for your students, or even a requirement to obtain a certain rank or certificate. Do that and I’d bet you could workout a student discount with Randy….

I say well done Randy King and thank you for creating this fantastic informative course – I cannot stress the need to know this material enough and now you have another exceptional way to access it.

Find Randy King’s New Course here: https://www.randykinglive.com/onlinetraining
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
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Rick Wilson
 
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Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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