ISAI - ISraeli Art of Integrity

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ISAI - ISraeli Art of Integrity

Postby imgor » Wed Jan 07, 2004 11:46 pm

Hello, my name is Moshe Gorelik. I live in Israel.
I deal with different Martial Arts for more than 25 years.
During last years I was lucky to notice some things and this
led me to developing of new art, which I called ISAI -ISraeli Art of Integrity. This is completely new, based on Western science art. Actualy ISAI is an implementation of bio-mechanical analyses of human movements for some purposes, mostly MA, but also for health purposes, energy balance, power and body building, improving of movements, etc. It was constucted top-down, from theoretical principles to actual movements and implementations. ISAI based completely on only one natural principal movement, which can be applied in different angles, directions, ranges , etc. Actually instead of numerious techniques ISAI has only one technique applied in numerious situations.
The result is completely natural, formless, very soft, fractal art, looking almost like Indian classical dance.
This makes ISAI very different from any other Martial Art I know.
ISAI can be (and was) applied for understanding and analyses of many different Martial Arts and the result can be great improvement in flow of movements, energy accumulation and delivery and so on.
ISAI also provides Western explanations of different phenomenas in Yoga and Chi Gong - Chakaras, Yin-Yang, Tan Diens, etc. This understanding can lead practioner to the more efficient practice of his own Art.

During last months we, my students and me were very lucky to establish very good and hearty relationships with George Mattson. We enjoined very much from his great support, hospitality and open-minded personality and approach.

Two days ago the video clip INtRO 1 about ISAI was posted on the official site of IUKF under ' Masters/Other Styles'.
The address is http://www.uechi-ryu.com/videos/masters.html

More information about ISAI can be found on the site
www.isai.info

I will be very happy to receive your comments, opinions and questions.

Best regards,
Moshe
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Re: ISAI - ISraeli Art of Integrity

Postby Oldfist » Thu Jan 08, 2004 5:45 pm

imgor wrote:ISAI based completely on only one natural principal movement, which can be applied in different angles, directions, ranges , etc. Actually instead of numerious techniques ISAI has only one technique applied in numerious situations.

The result is completely natural, formless, very soft, fractal art, looking almost like Indian classical dance.

This makes ISAI very different from any other Martial Art I know.

ISAI can be (and was) applied for understanding and analyses of many different Martial Arts and the result can be great improvement in flow of movements, energy accumulation and delivery and so on.



Moshe,

Thanks for your post and introduction. I really like the idea of thinking in terms of one or a few basic techniques applied in numerous situations.

I have viewed your video posted here and also the videos on your website. I really like the flow and natural (i.e. unconstrained by imposed unnatural technique) movement of the drills and demo martial applications called 'fish play' on your website.

However, it seems that quite a lot of the movements in the drills and martial application videos have you often turning your back and head to the opponent. In fact, some look like the visual focus is somewhere else with an essentially blind technique being executed, rather than having the focus still directly on the opponent, as in looking over your shoulder when you execute a rear (back) kick, or backfist, or hook kick, etc.

My concern is that too much of the training might be incorporating lack of, or improperly directed visual focus. I know that one should be able to respond to a surprise attack, but intentionally training too much with improper focus could be a serious problem if your training application includes real (street) fights, or even tournament point fighting. So, there's one question/comment :) .

The other question I have is about the name 'ISAI - ISraeli Art of Integrity'. I am curious why you chose the English word 'Integrity' and what aspect(s) of the meaning of this word you are trying to convey in your art.

Best,
John
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Postby imgor » Sat Jan 10, 2004 12:41 pm

Dear John,

Thank you very much for your interest and questions.

I tried to post my answer to your questions yesterday but… it still in the way, or, may be, due to my lack of experience with forums I did something wrong when tried to post my message.
So I had to write it once more. Sorry for delay.
I would start with an answer to your second question about reason for the name of ISAI.
I call the newly-discovered discipline an Art though it is based solely on science and uses scientific methods of bio-mechanical analyses, it is first and foremost an Art.
I was born into a traditional Jewish family in Russia, which had a generation-long dream to make 'aliya' (emigrate) to Israel. The 'aliya' to Israel was the first important thing I did when reached maturity and it was probably the most important event in my life. This is the reason why I call my art Israeli Art.
Another reason is that most Jewish people have always searched for ONE reason for all things in the World. They discovered and brought to the world the principle of One God. They also discovered, developed and brought to the world the alphabet (One of the most ancient Hebrew alphabets was discovered in … Yangshao culture, China, 4000 – 6000 B.C.). The Jewish or Hebrew alphabet reflects the element of an abstract idea of ONE instead of usage of thousands of hieroglyphs. So the spiritual idea and the method of recording and transaction of an idea – the both have the most important feature – ONE.
The subject of ISAI is also solely about ONE, one reason for all things, one reason for all human external and internal organization and movements. This is another reason for the appearance the word "Israeli" in the name of my Art.

The word Integrity reflects the quality of being complete, One, and of being honest.
These are two sides of one coin.
As such I hope every ISAI practitioner will be forever, in his art and in his character.
This is a reason for the word "Integrity" in the name of my Art.

Your second question or comment is about different turning techniques and manoeuvres, displaying the back, problems with visual focus during these movements, etc.

I will try to describe my points from 3 different angles:
- Theoretical approach
- Experiences - my personal experience as well as of my students and other martial artists
- Fights in animal world. Important point if we try to fight in most effective way, it means naturally

1. Theoretical approach.
The turnings and rotations can be watched in many Martial Arts: different and numerous styles of kung-fu; Indian Martial Arts; Thai boxing, modern and ancient as well and Pahayut; Tae kwan do, Kuk sool and Hapkido; Capoeira;
numerous grappling arts; etc. Even the western boxing has technique which is essentially blind and very close to turning: the boxer lowers his upper body and turns slowly (!) left-to-right and right-to-left almost parallel to the floor in order to escape safely from punches of his skilled opponent (it is very safe method to get out of punches and to counter-attack from close distance).
Turnings and rotations are very practical in street fights, especially against more than one opponent. During these fights turnings are 'must' techniques and visual focus can be only partial and mostly indirect.
In contact sports these techniques not so practical because they almost always followed by short techniques and especially by elbows, which mostly forbidden.
The great, sudden, extremely fast and unexpected changes of distances, angles and directions of attacks, unpredictable changes of attacking limb or limbs, nimble and elusive changes of turning directions and levels during attack – all these features make properly performed turnings to be extremely effective and safe method. The same will be right also for counter-attacks, dodges, ducking, swerving and escaping movements. Properly performed, especially when followed by fast fluent steps, the turning techniques are very surprisingly unexpected, the turns are very narrow, strikes and kicks follow each other with great speed and the density of attacks is very high.
It is very difficult to describe these things verbally without demonstration.
Some a half year ago my student Shai Hai visited Master George Mattson and demonstrated our method. May be you can ask him about his impression.
I know that many MA artists in the Western countries share your opinion that these techniques are not effective and even dangerous for performer himself.
Their turnings often are very wide and predictable. Many styles of Martial Arts in our countries have mostly 'frontal' approach and their back techniques are lacking effectiveness in fight. The straight movements and great stiffness of some artists and MA students make implementation of techniques based on rotations and turnings dangerous for them, not effective and awkward.
By the way the more linear and straight movements of opponent the better turnings will work.
The sportive tournaments also affected many styles.
This is why we can watch turning techniques so rarely and when finally somebody kicks back or turns around it looks very poor in many cases. In many cases people even didn't understand that they watched properly performed turning and/or blind technique.

2. Experiences.
My teacher, my students, some of my colleagues and me practice our art as a self-defense, not a sport. Many of us have great experience of street fights, for some these fights were part of their job, some had several fights almost every day for years. I don't say that it's good or bad, but just that this total, accumulated knowledge Includes many hundreds of fights.
During all years of practice we met almost every kind of people, of all levels, practicing many different martial arts, in dojo and in the street, in Israel and abroad. I never experienced any problems with our methods or heard about it. These techniques always were extremely effective and provided fast and clear-cut results.
The doubts and questions about effectiveness and safety of our techniques always stop at once after short demonstration on the asking person, even if the demonstration are slow and soft.
Please read in our site www.isai.info the chapter 'MA about ISAI'. You can read there about opinions of some very experienced and knowledgeable people.

3. Fights in animal world.
During many years of dealing with dogs and especially with Rhodesian Ridgebacks (RR) I saw many times turning and blind techniques during the fights and plays between the dogs.
It seems that Ridgebacks have inborn ability to turn during the fight or play.
Ridgebacks tend to fight with other dogs and they are mostly expert fighters. I saw many times that attacking Ridgeback will turn around, kick or push quickly another dog with his buttocks and, following his rotation, catch his opponent which was completely out of balance and disoriented. This inborn technique was always very effective. I saw also other breeds of dogs like Boxers, Rottweilers, etc. apply this method, may be not so often, but also always effectively.
Horses, crocodiles and other animals also apply these techniques for fight, self-defence or hunting. Everybody who experienced rear kicks of horse knows that this is very effective, safe and surprising technique.

Best,
Moshe
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Postby Oldfist » Sat Jan 10, 2004 8:52 pm

imgor wrote:I tried to post my answer to your questions yesterday but… it still in the way, or, may be, due to my lack of experience with forums I did something wrong when tried to post my message.
So I had to write it once more. Sorry for delay.

No problem, I have had the same experience :). On long posts that would take time to recreate, I generally periodically copy and paste what I am typing into a self-addressed email message. Just in case ...
I would start with an answer to your second question about reason for the name of ISAI.
I call the newly-discovered discipline an Art though it is based solely on science and uses scientific methods of bio-mechanical analyses, it is first and foremost an Art.
I was born into a traditional Jewish family in Russia, which had a generation-long dream to make 'aliya' (emigrate) to Israel. The 'aliya' to Israel was the first important thing I did when reached maturity and it was probably the most important event in my life. This is the reason why I call my art Israeli Art.
Another reason is that most Jewish people have always searched for ONE reason for all things in the World. They discovered and brought to the world the principle of One God. They also discovered, developed and brought to the world the alphabet (One of the most ancient Hebrew alphabets was discovered in … Yangshao culture, China, 4000 – 6000 B.C.). The Jewish or Hebrew alphabet reflects the element of an abstract idea of ONE instead of usage of thousands of hieroglyphs. So the spiritual idea and the method of recording and transaction of an idea – the both have the most important feature – ONE.
The subject of ISAI is also solely about ONE, one reason for all things, one reason for all human external and internal organization and movements. This is another reason for the appearance the word "Israeli" in the name of my Art.

The word Integrity reflects the quality of being complete, One, and of being honest.
These are two sides of one coin.
As such I hope every ISAI practitioner will be forever, in his art and in his character.
This is a reason for the word "Integrity" in the name of my Art.

Thanks very much for your detailed, fascinating, and inspiring explanation. I thought that it might have something to do with Jewish culture and the Hebrew language.
Your second question or comment is about different turning techniques and manoeuvres, displaying the back, problems with visual focus during these movements, etc.

I will try to describe my points from 3 different angles:
- Theoretical approach
- Experiences - my personal experience as well as of my students and other martial artists
- Fights in animal world. Important point if we try to fight in most effective way, it means naturally

<snip lots of good material...>

Once again thanks for a very interesting and helpful explanation! I think I have a much better feeling for what you are doing and your rich perspective on martial art.

My son and I started studying MA about five years ago. Our approach has been that of a traditional "liberal arts undergraduate," in that we have studied four different styles before "deciding on a major (specialization)." We have studied Shorin ryu, Sheeto ryu (intentionally misspelled), Tracy's Kenpo, and now traditional wushu for over two years.

Each one of these experiences has been a very valuable part of our training. The version of Shorin ryu that we studied gave us good basics and a good introduction. Sheeto ryu really stimulated our interest in the richness of kata, and provided a good introduction to a basic type of point fighting. Kenpo provided wonderful training in specific self-defense techniques, street self-defense, and open tournament point fighting. Our current study in traditional wushu has taken me to my athletic limits, but has provided a rich and challenging environment for my son to grow and reach his potential at a very high level, i.e. my goal as his father :)

Best,
John
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Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 11, 2004 5:27 am

Hi Moshe. Thank you for posting this very informative and fascinating thread.
Some a half year ago my student Shai Hai visited Master George Mattson and demonstrated our method.


I was present at the workout when Shai demonstrated your method, and I was impressed with the evasive spinning and whipping techniques in contrast with our stiff, frontal approach for the most part.


You write
Many styles of Martial Arts in our countries have mostly 'frontal' approach and their back techniques are lacking effectiveness in fight. The straight movements and great stiffness of some artists and MA students make implementation of techniques based on rotations and turnings dangerous for them, not effective and awkward.
By the way the more linear and straight movements of opponent the better turnings will work.



So that it is easier to understand, what defines “back techniques” as you wrote?

The straight movements and great stiffness of some artists and MA students make implementation of techniques based on rotations and turnings dangerous for them, not effective and awkward.


Can you give us some examples? In our system we have mostly frontal movements, and yes…stiffness, although not many would admit to it, as it is for the reason of developing “body armor”. Does your system have body conditioning drills, such as we do in Uechi?

We do have turning and “rotations” in our forms, but in our prearranged kumites we have stepping forward, stepping back, and sidestepping. Do you practice this forward, back, and sidestepping in your forms?

Do you have prearranged exercises or not, if not.. Why? If you do, can you explain the method of performance?

Thank you, and please give us more, as this is really intriguing. :D
Van
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Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 11, 2004 5:32 am

Turnings and rotations are very practical in street fights, especially against more than one opponent. During these fights turnings are 'must' techniques and visual focus can be only partial and mostly indirect.


Could you could explain the mechanism and the timing of such concepts.
Van
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Postby imgor » Sun Jan 11, 2004 9:56 pm

Hi John,
Thank you very much for your advise. In my second try I already pasted the WORD document, so this time I didn't take the chance.

It was interesting to read about your experience.
By the way in August 1995 I was in Baltimore at Wushu World Championship with Israeli team. It's nice that you train together -you and your son.

Best,
Moshe
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Postby imgor » Mon Jan 12, 2004 12:02 am

[quote="Van Canna"
I was present at the workout when Shai demonstrated your method, and I was impressed with the evasive spinning and whipping techniques in contrast with our stiff, frontal approach for the most part.

Dear Van Canna,
Thank you very much for what and how did you write.
I saw the video of Shai's demonstration and the picture from Hut. Interesting where are you in the picture or video?

You write:
So that it is easier to understand, what defines “back techniques” as you wrote?

Sorry for unclear statement.
I mean all techniques which include turning your back, partially or completely, toward the opponent or turning around your back. These techniques include back and side kicks, spinning around the back with stike, elbows or back or side kick.

You write:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The straight movements and great stiffness of some artists and MA students make implementation of techniques based on rotations and turnings dangerous for them, not effective and awkward.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Can you give us some examples? In our system we have mostly frontal movements, and yes…stiffness, although not many would admit to it, as it is for the reason of developing “body armor”. Does your system have body conditioning drills, such as we do in Uechi?

Yes, we have. The exersises which I called 'stretchings' and which include great muscular tension combined with breathing retantion are good example for this. These exercises provide what the Chinese call 'Iron Shirt'.
In fight we apply it dynamically, in whipping manner, like a sharp laughter, not in stiff way. The belly and the back of performer will perform Fish Play motion, physically and energetically.
There are also other exercises. All of them actually are Natural actions of human body, not exercises as we normally understand this word. They mostly performed for all the body.
These exersises have great simularities with some Yogic practices, but there are also great differences.
The breath retantions are performed in natural way like during yawning or strething.

There are also arms conditioning similar to yours, but these exercises are the same Fish Play movement.
It means we have different implementations for the same thing. We actually perform the same movement for the power developement, conditioning and fight.

I have to finish for today as it's very late hour now. I will try my best to answer your questions about frontal movements and stiffness as a mean of body armor.
I also will try to answer to your other questions.
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Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 12, 2004 12:31 am

Dear Moshe,

Again thank you for the information, I find it most interesting.

As to the video or photos at the hut, I may not be in them as I usual shun being photographed for the Internet.

You write > these techniques include back and sidekicks, spinning around the back with strike, elbows or back or sidekick. <

I like this concept very much.


Thank you
Van
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Postby imgor » Mon Jan 12, 2004 2:19 pm

Dear Van Canna,

I will try to answer to your other questions. Some of them touch very important, principally important concepts. So it will be impossible to provide good explanations without actual demonstrations. I will try my best, but I apologize in advance if the result will be somewhat not exactly 100% or even much less. It's like to study MA via distant learning and also English is not my mother tongue. So sometimes it can be difficult to understand my explanations.

You write:
In our system we have mostly frontal movements, and yes…stiffness, although not many would admit to it, as it is for the reason of developing “body armor”. My understanding of 'body armor' is that some parts of our body in any case can't be protected by any 'body armor' (face, reproductive organs, etc.) even in case of confrontation of two completely naked people.
If there are heavy shoes, sticks, knives and so on or additional 'friends' from the rear – in this case without to move fast only 'in god we can trust'.
On the other hand properly performed conditioning exercises don't lead to any stiffness at all. I think that stiffness can be caused mostly by mental disposition ('look at me, I am the best' or 'I am bigger, afraid now', like two male dogs facing each other) or by wrong training. Not by Uechi training.
Actually after morning-stretching-like exercises of ISAI the body will be softer and much more energetic. The same will happen when we stretch ourselves when we awake up, The cats, cheetahs, lions, dogs, monkeys – all stretch themselves before action or in order to invigorate their bodies and to make it strong. No lion will perform exercises, better he will rest much as possible, but these stretchings make him strong and … still soft.
In ISAI we perform these stretchings for few seconds every short time-period
(1 – 3 hours). It will not only make the body very strong and soft but also significantly improve CO2 balance, which is very good for health (pls. see Buteiko system) and endurance.
In the site 'The Golden Age of Iron Men' you can see which form isometric exercises took in the Western countries in the beginning of the 20 century.

Regarding frontal positioning or movements:
I think that if you have 3 attackers around you this approach will slow your attacks significantly. Also when you turn from one opponent to another you send him warning –' I am coming'. Sometimes to face to the left and to kick to the right is more effective, especially if you want to continue and to strike to the left. Closing and increasing of the distance, attack and retreat must be done with the same movement – so rotating is 'must' here.

Another very important, actually much more important thing is that, as I understand, in real life or in boxing in order to cope with opponent(s) you have to move constantly, even for very small degree. So ISAI have no stances and we have to react to the opponent's movement while we continue our own movement. As a result we always have to have possibility to pass from any movement to any other. If not - excessive movements or 'breaking the movements' will be involved and the performance will be predictable and slow. In ISAI with its only one movement it’s not a problem. For other arts it can be done easily if use biomechanical analyses of ISAI.
Actually what I do (and did for Pangeinoon, Chen style of Taiji Chuan and other systems) – I 'translate' their movements to ISAI's language and retranslate it back.

You write:
We do have turning and “rotations” in our forms, but in our prearranged kumites we have stepping forward, stepping back, and sidestepping. Do you practice this forward, back, and sidestepping in your forms?

We have no forward, back or side steps. All movements (I called them steps) in ISAI were classified and can be performed in any possible direction.
So , for example, if the pelvic floor 'looks' forward the movement 'X' will be forward kick; but if the pelvic floor will be oriented to the back 'X' will be back kick. The same will be right for any possible step (totally we have 8 steps in ISAI). So not my opponent nor even me know how the movement will look like at the end and which direction finally it will take. You can see all the steps in video clip in our site. I'm not sure that I was clear enough.
In order to practice these steps in any possible directions we work in or with male and female triangles and Magen David drown on the floor (I afraid I wouldn’t understand myself).

Do you have prearranged exercises or not, if not.. Why? If you do, can you explain the method of performance?

We have no prearranged kumites. Instead we have a lot of free fights in any possible configuration. And drills (or plays) as you could see in video clips.
Another thing, that kata of ISAI is a simply mathematical raw of all possible reasonable combinations, i.m. text-book of ISAI. I used as initial frame some Martial Arts, but It is possible to create such a book on basis of other arts as well.
By the way, this approach results also in fact that it is no necessity to learn different martial drills.
All Martial demonstrations you can see in video clip in you site as well the 'fight' are spontaneous, they were constructed first time during the filming of this clip. I performed them only once without repeating. For the next time, if I would like to repeat them once more and will not remember them, I have to watch the video. It's like a jazz or an Indian music.

quote:

Turnings and rotations are very practical in street fights, especially against more than one opponent. During these fights turnings are 'must' techniques and visual focus can be only partial and mostly indirect.


Could you could explain the mechanism and the timing of such concepts.


I hope some explanations are already done,but probably you mean something else - timing?

Best,
Moshe
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Postby Van Canna » Tue Jan 13, 2004 4:08 am

I hope some explanations are already done,but probably you mean something else - timing?


Thank you for the response, Moshe. Interesting the fact you do not have any prearranged work and work strictly random response action, something I believe in.

Can you give us your reasons for it?

Also can you describe your "timing" exercises, as well as any method you teach to deal with fear, the chemical cocktail, and mindsetting to total resolve and committment under the stress of a street fight.

Great to have you on board. :D
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Postby imgor » Tue Jan 13, 2004 11:26 pm

Hi,

You write:

Interesting the fact you do not have any prearranged work and work strictly random response action, something I believe in.

Can you give us your reasons for it?


We actually just perform only cycles of Fish Play movement. Direction of feet, height of the body positioning, Natural or Reverse movements and so provide us with the details of our movement. Also any movement of ISAI belongs to one of the steps of ISAI (totally we have 8 steps).
The opponent, if he is ISAI performer, moves also in one of these steps.
If the opponent performs any other moving art (Martial Arts are just a part of them) his performance is understood as a partial or fragmental performance of step of ISAI or sequence of steps. It is not unusual that different Martial Arts use one hand acting and another hand is 'frozen' elsewhere, contrary to ISAI, which always uses two hands moving together, something like during the walking, running or swimming. Bio-mechanically this usage of only one hand in general will affect the movement of the performer. For example, try to run or jump with your hands behind your back, or using only one hand.
When react, we don't change our movement, in order to be fast and not 'to lose our face'.
In other Arts the main problem is, for my opinion, the change from one movement to another. It takes a lot of time and energy. For example, forward punch and block with the same hand. Every one of them can be extremely fast, but to stop the punch and to start the block … - this joint is a main problem, for my opinion.

So, ISAI performer has to react with Natural or Reverse movement to the Natural or Reverse movement of his opponent, using different components (height, angle of facing, feet position and so on). This task is comparatively very simple as these movements differ only in their directions.

You write:

Also can you describe your "timing" exercises, as well as any method you teach to deal with fear, the chemical cocktail, and mindsetting to total resolve

I will try to write about these subjects tomorrow.

Best,
Moshe
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Postby imgor » Wed Jan 14, 2004 3:26 pm

Dear Van Canna,

Hello again,

This is a morning now in Israel. So I will continue my answers.

You write:
Also can you describe your "timing" exercises

Please consider that in ISAI we always use simultaneously two hands which turn in the same direction – clock-wise or counter clock-wise. For example right hand moves in up-down, left hand - in down-up direction, both turn in clock-wise direction. When the palms are parallel to the floor, they are placed just in front of the chest. The distance from the chest to the palms is in accordance to the projection of the distance between the legs in direction of the chest. The head looking straight between the palms. If the waist moves from 10:00 to 14:00, the right palm moves from near left ear to the near right hip, the left hand moves from left hip to the right ear.
This is a big hand turning, with big size of cycle. It can be much smaller, actually in his smallest version it will be done mostly by fingers.
The waist (and trunk of the body, but for lesser degree) will be always '3 hours' before the hands.
This is a very long, complicated and unclear explanation. I believe that in the chapter 'Movements and Techniques' in our site in www.isai.info you can find a better explanation.
Please watch also the video clips there.

Now we try to apply this walking-like movement from standing position, legs at 3:00 – 9:00 when our partner stands in front of us, his legs at 3:00 – 9:00 with extended right (left) hand. His hand points to the left, to the right or to the center of our chest, belly or head.
In order to deflect his hand we use left or right hand, depends on positioning of his hand. Our free hand will move as usual and will just pass in the air.
We are just 'walk thru' our opponent.
Our hands operate like rotating propeller turning from side to side.
The waist will move in both clock-wise and counter clock-wise direction. Deflection with palm and attacking motion with forearm-elbow-shoulder of the same hand happens in the same time. We end the movement with attacking motion. It is very important that while the palms still finishing their turning, the waist, shoulders and elbows already started to turn in the opposite direction.
If not, - your opened side of the body will be vulnerable for the counter-attack with the second hand of your opponent.
Now the opponent starts to move his hands forward slowly with Fish Play movements and we continue to perform our Fish Play movements.
Later we change our position and the opponent stands not in front of us at 12:00 but at other different principle angles: 10:00, 14:00, 15:00, 09:00.
Now we can combine our hands movements with 8 principal steps in all principal directions.
Sometimes two our hand will deflect, sometimes one hand deflects and the second hand will strike and sometimes two hands attack.
The legs work start later and we prefer to play with our legs and hands simultaneously against our opponent's legs.
The triangles and Magen David (with single step and later with the double step) play are necessary to fix this natural behavior and free fight will be introduced to polish the game.
All the process is mostly like a play, with a 'light and playful' mental orientation.

You continue:
as well as any method you teach to deal with fear, the chemical cocktail, and mindsetting to total resolve

With a faster movements you start to 'hunt' your opponent – faster and faster, with more resolute intention, and – play gently again. This is something similar to how two young dogs or cats play. They play … and prepare themselves for fighting and hunting.
In these stages triangles play will be very close to fight.
So in real confrontation just play and hunt your victim.
But, if you recognize, that the victim is yourself it's much better to retreat, like lion when meets elephant.
If you can't retreat – go ahead, like rat closed in the corner.

But please remember that genetically people can differ very much and the bravery is mostly the genetic feature. As any other animals.
I never saw coward dog, even successfully trained and skilled, that will attack frontally in real situation.
We, people, have the same problem.

In later phases practitioner will see, that progressive steps of dealing with external signal (recognition, classification and decision) - all these phases are in the Fish Play and the triangle play at the mental plane. The same will happen at the physical plane (collection, accumulation, action).
The different planes of control of the opponent, which is an optional during the action phase – mental and physical – also have the same structure.
This is fractality and Magen David structure in conceptual level.
But, I think, this is completely different subject.

I will be very glad to any other questions – yours or of every other visitor of the forum.

Best,
Moshe
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Re: ISAI - ISraeli Art of Integrity

Postby ACloutier » Thu Jul 06, 2017 5:06 am

I was doing a bit of research on a strange video on YouTube showing what looked like an absolutely impractical "fighting art" and ran across this post concerning a Kung Fu teacher named Moshe Gorelik. It seems that the founder of "Israeli Art of Integrity" (ISAI) mentioned in this forum post actually has no integrity himself. According to the article at the following link, Mr. Gorelik is a convicted sex offender in Tel Aviv. Just FYI.

http://www.haaretz.com/convicted-sex-of ... n-1.248940
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Re: ISAI - ISraeli Art of Integrity

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 06, 2017 1:39 pm

Thanks for bringing this to my attention...the world is indeed a very strange place... :(
Van
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