Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 24, 2020 2:07 pm

Very true, Paul. And the advice above to get off line is scoffed at by Uechi people who are 'task fixed' at standing their ground, according to 'sanchin'...instead of learning to ingrain 'zig/zag' skills with footwork/blocks/ and sweeps.

While it might be easier to block an opponent not so big and not too strong...the linear blocks will fail every time if up against big strong opponents. Think of blocking someone like Andre Tippet, as an example.

I have a couple of 'supermen' in my class who will be glad to prove the point. And landing a kick or punch on them is like hitting a steel wall.

Also if a student has not ingrained off line skills...the moment he is attacked by multiple opponents, he will be quickly swarmed, taken down, and kicked to death.

We have the off line drills in the hojo undo set for the ones who can recognize them.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 24, 2020 2:17 pm

Tunnel vision and task fixation are usually the result of heart rate, which is elevated and in turn caused by epinephrine (adrenaline) in the blood. The more epinephrine your adrenal glands dump in, the worse it gets.

The amount dumped in is all courtesy the hypothalamus, which in turn is getting kicked in the crotch by the amygdala... so the bigger you perceive the threat, the more likely you're subject to tunnel vision and task fixation


You have no idea how many Uechi students discard this information thinking/saying it does not apply to them or to Okinawan teachers, even though it is hardwired by nature. They really think they can beat tunnel vision by practicing the sanchin stare/vision expansion :lol:
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:09 pm

Ponder this...THE RULES FOR BEING HUMAN


When you were born, you didn’t come with an owner’s manual; These guidelines make life work better.

You will receive a body. You may like it or hate it, but it’s the only thing you are sure to keep for the rest of your life.

You will learn lessons. You are enrolled in a full-time informal school called life on planet earth. Every person or incident is the Universal Teacher.

There are no mistakes, only lessons. Growth is a process of experimentation. "Failures" are as much a part of the process as "success."

A lesson is repeated until learned. It is presented to you in various forms until you learn it-then you go on to the next lesson.

If you don’t learn easy lessons, they get harder. External problems are a precise reflection of your internal state.

When you clear inner obstructions, your outside world changes. Pain is how the universe gets your attention.

You will know you’ve learned a lesson when your actions change. Wisdom is practice. A little of something is better than a lot of nothing.

"There" is no better than "here." When your "there" becomes a "here" you will simply obtain another "there" that again looks better then "here."

Others are only mirrors of you. You cannot love or hate something about another unless it reflects something you love or hate about yourself.

Your life is up to you. Life provides the canvas; you do the painting. Take charge of your life-or someone else will.


.You always get what you want. Your subconscious rightfully determines what energies, experiences, and people you attract-therefore, the only foolproof way to know what you want is to see what you have. There are no victims, only students.


. There is no right or wrong, but there are consequences. Moralizing doesn’t help. Judgments only hold the patterns in place. Just do your best.

. Your answers lie inside you. Children need guidance from others; as we mature, we trust our hearts, where the Laws of Spirit are written. You know more than you have heard or read or been told. All you need to do is look, listen, and trust.

. You will forget all of this.

. You can remember any time you wish.


Source: Unknown
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 25, 2020 5:59 am

Don’t Believe Them

Featured Articles
with Police Magazine
October 18, 2004

Old cops know "stuff"
by Roy Huntington


I was recently asked by a young man who was about to be hired by a police agency to give him “some advice,” as he said, “so I don’t get killed or anything.”

I wasn’t sure about the “or anything” part, but the “get killed” part I could help with. So I made up this list. I take little credit for most of it and gladly give due to those hundreds of street- and battle-weary cohorts who I’ve worked around. Their collective experience amounts to thousands of “street years.”


Don’t Believe Them

Probably the single most important thing I recall from all my years is that people lie. Grandmas, that “nice kid down the block,” wives, husbands, sisters, brothers, neighbors, store owners, delivery men, waitresses, garbage men, doctors, lawyers (of course), witnesses, and even suspects, they all lie.

Not all the time, not even most of the time, but just about the time you want to believe somebody, you’ll find out they’re lying and be very disappointed.

Crooks always lie. Always. And they’ll look you right in the eye when they do it, and smile, and be all serious and such, and you’ll be tempted to believe them. Don’t believe them. Ever.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 25, 2020 6:07 am

The Killing

If they’re going to kill you, they’ll do it with their hands. Handcuff anyone you feel inky about, even if they get upset about it. You can always say, “Sorry, Sarge, it seemed like the right thing to do at the time.”

I had to apologize for this once, but the guy was still sore about it and I figured he’d call in a complaint. Oh well, I lived, and besides, a day “on the beach” isn’t always a bad thing.

Search anyone you get close to in a field contact if things get even semi-serious or if you have the least suspicion about anything.

Search anyone you put into your car; even the nice fellow you’re giving a ride to.

And watch their hands constantly.

Do a little test and watch a “regular” person’s hands for a few minutes. You’ll see how they move them, where they put them, and what they do with them.

Now, the next time you are around a suspect, watch his or her hands. You’ll see differences.

Suspects hold their hands more still or more active than regular people. They keep their palms open or close their fists. Or they keep their fingers stiff. Take note, and file it away. These observations aren’t always things you can write down and say, “They do this with their hands,” but you’ll see the difference quickly.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 25, 2020 6:09 am

Weapons and Tools

Carry a backup gun where you can get to it. If your agency doesn’t allow backup guns, make a stink and get your union involved. Then make a bigger stink. Change agencies if they still say no.

I’ve personally known about eight officers who have used backup guns to save their own lives or the lives of other officers. You probably know some, too. We carry fire extinguishers, why not backup guns?

Carry a folding knife where you can get to it. Carry a sturdy pair of pliers and both kinds of screwdrivers in your kit bag. Carry a small crowbar, too. Carry some leather work gloves and use them.

Which brings me to a very important piece of advice: protect your hands. They will save your life, so guard them zealously. Don’t risk them by reaching into places and doing things you should be using tools for.

Don’t put your hand into a suspect’s pockets. You’ll get stuck by needles. Buy a small metal detector and use it. Buy puncture-resistant gloves and use them. If you have to, cut the suspect’s pocket open first. So you may have to buy another pair of pants for some creep. So what.

Don’t get in the habit of putting your own hands in your pockets. It looks slovenly and, besides, you may need those hands to save your life, so you want them available. Fast.

Carry at least one box of full-metal-case ammo for your duty gun and keep it handy in your gear bag. It usually out-penetrates hollow-point ammo, and it might be of help in some situations.

If you can, also carry a few spare, loaded mags in your gear bag, even cheap ten-round mags. When you need them, you’ll need them immediately, with no time to load them. Remember the North Hollywood bank robbery shootout?

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:10 pm

Think hard on this one


Think hard on this one: If your department does not allow you to carry a rifle, bring your own slugs for the shotgun. Buy premium, sabot’d slugs, high velocity, solid copper. They can poke holes through things like body armor.

Better yet, carry your own rifle, regardless. Even pistol caliber is better than nothing, although .223 or .308 or even a .30-30 Winchester is best.

I used to carry a cut-down Mini-14 in my “trunk bag” in the early ‘80s. No one ever knew I had it until I pulled it out on a felony stop on suspects who had been shooting. I got yelled at later, but the cops at the scene almost “high-fived” me when they saw it come out. This is, of course, a personal decision and you know your own department’s frame of mind on the matter.

If any of this violates your particular department’s policy, you’ll have to make your own decisions on the matter.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:13 pm

Lots of Lights


Buy a good light. If the department doesn’t issue you one, don’t whine, just buy one. Buy a Streamlight, SureFire, Pelican, or the like.

Keep a small, high-intensity light on your belt as a backup or to use in the daytime inside. Also carry a tiny light on your key chain.

You may think all of these lights are overkill. But once my main rechargeable light and my backup belt light both died in the middle of a felony stop, and I finished it with my penlight. Honest.

Carry your flashlight in your off-hand, not your gun hand. If it hits the fan, you don’t want to have to pass your flashlight to your off-hand so you can draw your gun.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:15 pm

Stopping Cars


When making a traffic stop at night, approach from the passenger side, after walking behind your patrol car to get there.

You’ll see the driver looking in his outside rear-view mirror for you, until you tap on the passenger window. Then, you’ll see him jump from being startled.

Except sometimes you’ll see the gun in his hand as he waits for you. I did.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:18 pm

Point Your Gun


When in doubt, point your gun at people if you think they might try to kill you or somebody else. There’s no law saying they have to shoot first or that you can only draw from your holster after the threat shows itself.

If that little voice inside your head says, “Hey, stupid, you’d better be ready to rock any second,” then get ready to rock. Any second.

Sometimes that little voice is dead wrong. But you can always say you’re sorry, and a surprising number of people are awfully nice about it once you explain what happened and why.

When a cop says something like, “I worked the streets for 10 years and never pulled my gun out of the holster,” he’s either lying or too stupid for words. Don’t listen to him either way.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Mar 26, 2020 2:48 pm

Puncture Wounds


People will try to stab you with anything at hand, especially in the kitchen. And they are often very calm and cooperative just prior to stabbing you. They may even be smiling.

Pencils, screwdrivers, scissors, and any long, skinny thing can kill you. Remember, “watch their hands.”
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Mar 26, 2020 2:50 pm

Street Work

Always, always, always use good sense. If something feels wrong, simply believe it’s wrong until you know for sure it’s not. And even then, you’re probably wrong not to listen to that first inner warning.

Just because the warrant or criminal history computer system is down doesn’t mean you can’t figure out if the turd you’ve stopped is a crook. Use your wits first. Use the computer last.

When you’re at a family fight, get the kids out of the way first. Then, if you arrest the husband, be prepared for the wife to fight you, even if she’s been a victim. And the kids don’t have to watch it happen—again.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Mar 26, 2020 2:52 pm

Contact and Cover

When contacting someone, especially a bad guy, use at least two officers or hold the situation still until cover is there. Then one cop should act as the cover officer while the other makes the actual contact, asks the questions, searches, etc.

The cover officer should never touch the suspect, ask questions, or otherwise get involved. His or her job is simply to watch the suspect, the crowd, the traffic, etc., and cover the contact officer. If it hits the fan, the cover officer should make strong, bold, decisive movements to gain control. Instantly.

If you’re on a scene and are the contact officer and the cover officer starts to search the vehicle or become distracted, assume the role of cover officer and tell him he’s got the contact now. Don’t tolerate anything else. Your life is on the line.

Don’t be hesitant to stay away from danger. There’s no law saying you have to close on a suspect until you’re ready to. Wait until it’s safe to do so, or until you feel you have to close the distance due to circumstances beyond your control, like an immediate threat to a life.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Mar 26, 2020 2:54 pm

Career Survival


Don’t ever lie to cover up something another cop does. If Internal Affairs is interviewing you as the subject officer in an investigation, you’re the last one interviewed, and they already know the answers to the questions they’re asking you. Honest. And if you don’t believe me, ask a former Internal Affairs officer.

There’s only about 10 million other things, so add to this list, expand on it, improve it, and otherwise hone it. Then read it now and again. And don’t forget to listen to and seek advice from older, experienced officers. Believe what they say.

Stay safe, and remember, people lie. Or did I say that already?



Roy Huntington is editor of American Handgunner magazine and a member of the POLICE Advisory Board.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 30, 2020 10:53 pm

Staying safe on the road


because of covid 19 panic...drivers are getting more of a danger with speeding, tailgating, and being A-holes.

Practice this:

*Be alert and attentive while unlocking your vehicle and getting in- this is a great time for an ambush, from a criminal perspective.

*Check the rear seat or area of your vehicle before getting in, and do a quick check to make sure your vehicle hasn't been tampered with.

*Lock your vehicle doors as soon as you get in- before you even start your engine.

*While driving, remain in "Condition Yellow". If you're not familiar with the term Condition Yellow, you HAVE to read THIS!

*Remember to always leave plenty of room between your car and the car ahead of you when stop at a traffic light, to allow you to 'get out of Dodge' as fast as possible in case something happens. Remember- it's always better to get out of the situation altogether than to have to get out of a fight.

*Try to never allow yourself to become "boxed in" between cars. There's a big difference between having to jump a curb and having to push a car out of the way. Stay out of the middle lane if you're going through 3 lanes of traffic that could stop.

*If someone cuts you off or honks at you, just let it go. It's not a big deal! Yes- they are probably ignorant jerks, but don't even react. Just go about your business.

*Be VERY attentive at traffic lights and stop signs- even in rural areas. These are perfect ambush points- so be ready, and don't linger any longer than you have to.

*Always be polite and extra courteous to other drivers. Pause for a moment to let people enter the roadway in front of you in thick traffic, and slow down to let people merge in front of you. Smile and use hand signals to communicate, and wave a "thanks" to those who let you in.

I'm not sure where the idea of "karma" came from, but I've done a LOT of traveling on the USA roadways, and I can sure tell you that on the road- what goes around comes around!

Being polite and forgiving can save from road-rage altercations, but it can't help against carjackers. Remember what I said about Condition Yellow!!

--

Tim Schmidt
Owner / Founder - USCCA
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