Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:03 pm

Don Rearic »

The cliches are endless, the Internet is marvelous. How to deal with ambush attacks?

Get your head out of your ass when you're on the street and take a look around...

How to deal with a kicker? Don't go to the ground and don't kick him - don't play his game.

How to deal with a boxer? Don't box him unless you already know you're better than he is and you will never know unless it is a revenge attack and the guy has a rep on the street.

How to deal with a street thug? When in Rome, be a Roman, when confronted with a thug, be a better thug.

How to deal with a knifer?

Learn about knives, keep on your toes, get something in the form of a weapon...

How to deal with a gunman? Learn about firearms, learn how to shoot, if it is that critical, get Second Chance body armor and learn about knives, get a carry permit for your own firearm if you can...

How to deal with a choker/grappler? Learn how to use a knife.

I think I covered half of what I wanted to and it was all for free. :)

Stultorum infinitus est numerus

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:07 pm

AlanL »

The Truth Is...
90% of what is taught in most martial arts schools, self defense seminars and videos...just won't work on the street!



If you believe the effects of adrenal stress this number may not be to far off.

In fact I've had the opportunity to watch many seasoned blackbelts from many styles be lucky to use 10%.

However I do believe the % can increase based on more exposure to adrenal stress training.

An example of what I mean is the references Van makes at how cool Joe P. stays during NHB matches.

Rory probably sees this also with the type of training he tells us about. I also feel more in control in scenario training as I do more of it. However I can't say I've been able to do anything fancy yet. Just feel more in control of the situation.

I think we have to come to grips with the difference of studying a martial art and self defense.

I love studying Uechi-ryu.

However doing adrenal stress training really made me look into my Uechi and separate out what will work for me when the chemical cocktail kicks in.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:19 pm

What Don and Alan write is correct in all respect and anyone practicing Uechi or “whatever-Ryu” should do some introspection besides the 'chicken dance' on the floor.

But how does that song go:

breaking up is hard to do

Hard to let go of concepts that have kept one going for thirty years and more. It’s like someone suddenly tearing down the walls of your house.

What is also, or should be of concern, but usually isn’t because of the denial syndrome in traditional training is, you won’t know who and what you are dealing with when you get into a beef on the street in spite of our best intentions
to “identify_ predict- decide- execute” the threat and evasive maneuvers.

The best people I know who can really handle themselves, and they have, seem to have a sixth sense that makes them come out on top... Almost a gift... Natural selection, if you will, regardless of skills or weapons.

A case of the “Alpha Dog” we have discussed in the past.

Sad though is to watch sensible, fairly intelligent people, hold contempt for the realities of the street, [that Rory educates so well with his books] and the importance of the effects of the adrenaline dump they don’t believe will affect them. This denial alone is what will kill them in a fight...

The police detectives I spoke with in the investigation of the black belt killing said that there was no forensic evidence he even put up a good fight with the gangbanger who was out to kill him.

And take breathing for examples... it is not the particular method of breathing that is important, but the breathing itself as controlled by the cardiovascular demands of the moment.

Then it is important to understand what we mean by “demands” _ you have the “sports” demands that cuts your breath, and so you try to mimic that in your training, then you have the “hormonal” demand that is only triggered by adrenal stress, and the one that will usually sink you in spite of your prowess in long distance running, or all your katas by holding your breath on the strike thinking it gives you more power.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:31 pm

What is that basic "thing" that separates the average "Joe karate" from the street violent punks, and the street violence concept?

There so man of us who really believe it makes no difference as we are properly trained to deal with any street violence....like Maloney says: "that's what makes angels of people"

So karate becomes your stairway to the stars...and we have seen/ read so many examples of this...

The main distinguishing trait is, of course, malicious intent.

This type of intent is never present in the dojo Uke or scenario training, so “Joe Karate” has no idea of the force malicious intent really is in street fights.

Think of it: the average martial artist is law abiding, decent, compassionate, hesitant to inflict harm on fellow humans, and loathes those who don’t share this compunction.

In spite of dojo bravado and fantasies, he/she finds difficult to reconcile to the concept of countervailing violence by hand, knife, or gun.


You see more of this in women. So as a rule, we don’t have it in us to be ruthless as one might have to be to come out of something ugly in one piece, and we need to push to higher limits to react violently, if at all.

Also, this has to do with how and what we envision our enemy to be like and are lulled by a “standard” that creeps into your psyche on the friendly dojo floor __

Truth is, there is no such thing. Confrontations may or may not start “ugly” but have a way to get to that stage quickly when the actor harbors the seed of malevolent intent...Something you do not harbor as a rule.

Hard to accept that a young little 14-year-old punk will really cut your throat with a knife, whereas you would never think of it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:35 pm

Rick Wilson »

From David Lowry’s column In Black Belt Magazine page 34 April 2003 issue:

“An old New Yorker cartoon had a trio of scientists looking over some mice running through a maze. The caption read, “You’ll notice, Dr. Jones, how the power to asses, process and act upon information increases dramatically when Dr. Smith here throws in the cat.”



Same issue page 44 Alain Burrese’s column discusses the fact that most martial arts tend to train for fights not combat. The distinction he makes is that in a fight the intent is not to cause death or grievous harm just to hurt.

In combat the guy is out to kill you.

Read Darren’s post: http://forums.uechi-ryu.com/viewtopic.p ... 28&start=0 and you will see the difference and what can happen to those who do not understand the difference.

Just a few thoughts

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:43 pm

Sometimes I think it just comes down to too much damn thinking and analyzing what's happening - a potential victim can work them self into a real panic, aiding the aggressor's efforts to ****** the life out of them - turning them into the perfect victim. Just recognize what is going down and act don't think so damned much.


True.

But one thing must be understood. There are stages of “recognition” __

Usually the “panic” sets in after the mind has “searched” within for an “instinct” to resolve the attacking problem/situation, but has failed to find it. This can take place in milliseconds. [what happened to the black belt killed in the stairway]

It is at this moment that the chemical cocktail envelops us with a vengeance.

The other hurdle to overcome is that try as you will, in a dojo of whatever martial arts discipline, save very few, the training rarely reaches the intensity and anxiety of a street fight with the adrenaline firing both barrels.


Hard to accept is the fact that in a vicious street confrontation, when the brain senses the possibility of serious injury or even death, the triggered response may include extreme fear of even running away.

You simply freeze in terror and run into a “road block” __ martial arts training notwithstanding.

There are zillions examples of this, in spite of the fantasy that “it doesn’t apply to my style, to my training or to me /BS.

You may look and feel tough on a dojo floor where your primal instincts are at rest...but in a darkened stairway facing a gang banger with a knife...your instincts will shock you with the realization you are about to die.

It all depends on what it is that is being perceived as a threat...

Despite any training/any powerful striking ability/any 'super' skills [true or imagined] it all hinges on the type of adversary facing you and his intent.

Your 'great blocks' will only work against certain opponents...

some adversary might just be too big and twice as strong and his punches you will never stop with blocks, or you might not even see the punches that knock you down...or the blade he carves you out with.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:31 pm

Our strenght and weakness

Conceptual Self Preservation
[By Tony Manifold]

Great article by Tony..

Be honest with yourself, what are your strengths and weaknesses. Play to your strengths and minimize your weaknesses. Work on your weak points but spend more time on your best tools. And even more important, choose tools that fit your set of concepts.

A bit more on that point should be said. I read an article by Hawkins Cheung, friend and fellow Yip Man student of Bruce Lee’s, he was writing on Bruce Lee’s Jeet Kune Do.

JKD is one of the finest examples of a CMA, even if it is abused more often that not these days.
Mr. Cheung was writing on the myriad of JKD practitioners who strive to pare away the arts while attempting to find the next great thing, be it grappling or whatever.

He said that if one is still adding moves (i.e. Still in the process of learning a style), one is not ready to start paring away yet.

I agree with him, to a point. It is useless to spend too much time on something that doesn’t fit your set of concepts.

However, you never know if your CMA will change (in fact it probably will); also as you learn and grow you may learn that you have a place for that move, after all.

I am a voracious learner, I love learning a new move or trick. I normally practice it a few times, until I think I will remember it and whether or not I like it; then it goes into the vault.

I can think of dozens of times that I have remember a move and thought, “Hey, this would work really well with what I am doing now.”

In short, never dismiss anything out of hand.

If someone offers you some knowledge, experiment with it then keep it in the back of your mind until you find a place for it.

[By Tony Manifold]
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 19, 2018 2:34 am

Rick Wilson »

I do not stand there in the “Hit Me Uechi Stance”.

There might be people out there that can invite you down the centre line and block your strike and then successfully defend themselves.

But I doubt there are many that can do it against a real attack.

They also begin at a deficit because of the block (defensive) mind set.

In addition this approach usually works very nice in prearranged Kumites but does not work as well against a constant barrage of attacks with full intent.


This type of “defense” is usually demonstrated by the: hit me request and a pointing to the chest.

The helpful person throws one punch down the centre line (at the target indicated) and it is successfully blocked and countered.

Well, that is not how things generally happen in the real world.

Uechi Ryu is designed as an in-close fighting style. It is often described as designed to be used in a phone booth.

If you look at the forms they are done primarily out of Sanchin stance. Sanchin is a squared up position. This is the natural human reaction to in your face challenge.

I think it was Roy Bedard who made this point. Go up to someone (a buddy don’t start a fight :) ) and shove them. The first thing they do is square up. It is what humans do.

So Uechi Ryu is designed to square you up as you deal in close.

I need to make a distinction here. Squaring up does not mean you have to stand in front of some one and bang it out. You should have the angle on the aggressor whenever possible with your toes pointing at their centre.

The misunderstanding comes when you step back out of the area Uechi was designed to operate in and decide for some reason to take a poor position.

It does not make any sense to stand squared up AND squarely in front of the aggressor. This just isn’t smart.

I fall more into the Jim Maloney school of thought to “blade” your opponent. Sanchin is not lost here just applied to a more effective end.

In a real encounter, as pointed out on other threads, it begins fast and hard. The Uechi Ryu Wauki or Mawashiuki or circle block or the term I prefer -- circling palms is a series of striking/clearing/trapping palms that are in constant motion.

The starting position might be the Kumite one but they are constantly moving through, across, down and out from the centre line. In effect the centre line gets covered while you do damage.

In close Sanchin is a very mobile stance in that a quick pivot of the feet changes the angle of the body. A slight slide of the feet completely re-orientates your angle on the aggressor. A rocking of the knees shifts the centre line off line.

All of this is very important in a real life conflict because in a sudden explosion of an attack you often do not have an opportunity to move your feet. Following first contact you can use foot movement to angle on your opponent with the follow up attacks.

This movement is often missed by many Uechi practitioners.

Uechi Ryu is a two handed system. By this I meant both hands are always moving at the same time. There is always a strike or shear while the other arm is intercepting or trapping or slamming.

Look at the Wauki closely and you will see that both arms are always moving at the same time.

Anyway there is a quick look at why I think there is just the one centre line.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 19, 2018 2:47 am

Excellent post by Rick.

Uechi Ryu is designed as an in-close fighting style. It is often described as designed to be used in a phone booth.


Then read again what he says about the necessity of angling instead of exchanging big wet French kisses with your opponent in the booth.

What the 'phone boot' people never even touch upon[because they are not even aware of it] is that at 'phone booth' distance your nose will end up in your opponent's mouth as previously discussed here.

"but...but...but...Van...once I close the distance, the opponent is done for"

Sure...it is nice to dream ...because it is all you will have left when half your nose has become chewing gum in your attacker's mouth.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 19, 2018 6:16 am

The rooting in sanchin and the wauke 'perpetual motion' palms in interceptions, strikes, and rotational body compression are of course coiling, shearing, twisting, wrapping moves_ useful against limbs and neck of an opponent.

But only if doing so does not expose you to the dangers of biting, knifings, head butting, or neck/body chokes...or deadly bear hugs by opponents very big and very strong, plus the danger of bodily fluids.

As useful and effective 'phone booth' fighting skills may be and may well be the best way for some to prevail...we must be wary of a distinction that I keep on making:

If you are fighting a street fight in fear of death or serious bodily harm...the ability to be effective at a safe distance is paramount.

At the Legal Force Institute we were taught that distance is our friend, armed or unarmed in a confrontation.

We are also talking about 'reaction time'...Rory Miller has written and will teach you, for example, that generally before a fight takes place[except the true ambush, such as it happened to our Uechi brothers in Brockton...three punks appearing out of the dark behind their pick up truck] you get a sense of something 'going down' and ready yourself for it.

If we 'burn in' the close your distance with students in our classes...in a situation they will react in that manner and end up dead or in a wheel chair.

Recall the case about the Uechi practitioner who was told by his teacher that 'anyone violating his sanchin would die' so he gets in a fight with multiple opponents, he warns them about his karate 'power' and closes in on them instead of taking off.

He was beaten so bad, he spent three weeks in the Norwood Hospital.

I often wonder how many students we, as teachers, have steered to the same fate.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 19, 2018 6:47 am

There will be many times where ...Your best reaction is to move into the attack and counterattack...reason why the 'short stopping' drills are mandatory.

But you need to learn to be able to make a snap decision on either entry or evade...because if you 'enter' against the wrong opponent, you will die, including being crushed to death in a bear hug.

The very best fighters are the ones who can 'enter' in a flash, if needed, strike and get back 'out' to move to safety...remember we are talking self defense, not 'mutual combat'_ I think sometimes people lose sight of this distinction.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 19, 2018 6:55 am

Canada not as safe as the US

Only 13 percent of American burglaries are committed when the premises are occupied.

In Canada, the percentage is four times higher.

In cities such as Vancouver, home invasion burglaries aimed at elderly people have become endemic and murders of the elderly during those burglaries are all too frequent.

In Quebec, the provincial police are under orders from their commander to reduce arrests for burglaries because the jails are full.

In Holland 48 percent of burglaries occur when homes are occupied, while in England 59 percent do.


[Professor Kopel]
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 19, 2018 6:57 am

CANDANeh »

Why????

Young offenders act is a mayor reason for break ins and attacks on elderly in homes.

They know they are untouchable (I know of many break ins in local area committed by those whose names can not be made public) .

Another is that the chance of being shot during a Canadian break in is slim and most certainly not expected (Canadians are not supposed to have guns for protection).

Break ins have less of a penalty than jacking the Royal deer, if your a minor have no fear as you will have no record, your name can not be released and you will be treated as a victim of society.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby paulg » Tue Jun 19, 2018 10:45 am

What about this thought? We benefit greatly from learning the classical form of movements in the traditional training, but then we stick with it too long... It gives us the body-knowledge of the physics involved in delivering power. But then we should eventually get past it. Seeing advanced students and teachers WITH THIRTY, FORTY, EVEN FIFTY YEARS OF STUDY MOVING LIKE WHITE BELTS IS KIND OF PATHETIC, ISN'T IT? Old italian expression from the renaissance; 'impara l'arte, e mette la da parte' (learn the art and then put it aside). And this is coming from someone who has always been a 'kata man'.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 19, 2018 1:22 pm

Hi Paul,

Thanks for the post. I am in complete agreement with you on this 'learn the art and put it aside'...

Similar to having a tool box and the skills to use those tools, but the circumstances dictating the usage, and the use of those tools without cutting off a few fingers or get splinters in your eye.

Another mistake we see often is a very good teacher with good physical attributes who can make techniques work effectively for him, trying to convince average students not as gifted as he is, that they will be able to do the same.

This is very insidious 'teaching' because it lead students down primrose path with the end result of serious injury [the sanchin violation crap] or death [the black belt champion who froze under attack by the gangbanger who cut his throath, according to police forensics]...

I had taken over the 'don't violate my Sanchin' dojo and when calling drop outs, I got the father of the student that got put in the hospital by the 'Sanchin violation' and he was fuming and threatening to sue the Mattson Academy for having deceived his son.

It is really as Rory warns us all...we don't know very much about real street violence, and should be very careful when teaching self defense...without specific attention to the tactical and the possible criminal/civil financial devastation...along with physical/emotional destruction.

I kind of wander how many students in class have taken the time to read just a couple books from Rory [two classics] "Meditation on violence" and "Facing violence"

All should take a poll.
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