Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 23, 2018 10:10 pm

Law 8: Make other People come to you – use Bait if Necessary
When you force the other person to act, you are the one in control. It is always better to make your opponent come to you, abandoning his own plans in the process. Lure him with fabulous gains – then attack. You hold the cards.

The essence of power is to keep the initiative, to get others to react to your moves, to keep your opponent and those around you on the defensive. When you make other people come to you, you suddenly become the one controlling the situation. And the one who has control has power.

One added benefit of making the opponent come to you is that it forces him to operate in your territory.

Being on hostile ground will make him nervous and often he will rush his actions and make mistakes.

For negotiations or meetings, it is always wise to lure others into your territory, or the territory of your choice. You have your bearings, while they see nothing familiar and are subtly placed on the defensive.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jun 24, 2018 2:02 am

CCW-SAFE

Level V: DEADLY FORCE

The last step in the civilian use of force continuum is the use of deadly force. A deadly force incident has long lasting effects, and can be mentally, emotionally, and financially devastating.

This is why it is highly recommended to avoid incidents that could potentially lead to deadly force. There are some instances where deadly force is unavoidable, and in those cases, it is usually the suspect who determines that it has to be used.

But some cases, such as road rage shooting cases, can be avoided by not getting drawn in to someone else’s anger and violence.

From 2014 to 2016, road rage cases involving a gun increased from 247 to 621 in the US. 73 of those in 2016 ended with deadly force, and 171 ended with wounded victims.


As stated above, a self defense shooting can have numerous long lasting effects on individuals. Take it from those who have personally been involved in shootings and have gone through the aftermath and everything involved.

Taking a life is not natural, and even in cases where it is totally justified, it can be hard on individuals and also their families. Further that with being criminally charged with a crime, or sued civilly, it can become exponentially harder.

I often hear "If I'm involved in a shooting, I'm not too concerned with criminal charges, as I would only act in self defense." which is actually how I used to look at it as well.

However, not everyone will see a self defense shooting through the same lens.

Think about how many people you come in contact with on a daily basis who have totally different opinions than you on politics, religion, healthcare, and on and on. People you work with, or have daily contact with.
That person you see at the coffee shop everyday, your neighbor down the street, even family members may have totally different opinions on these issues.

We have also talked about retaliation, and how real that is. If the suspect survives, or has family members who seek retaliation, it can be a real concern not only for you, but for your family as well.

In cases where the threat of grave bodily harm or death could not be avoided through the various levels including situational awareness, assessment, assistance, and action, then the only option left is deadly force.

Getting back to the question of “At what point do I have no other options other than do use deadly force” is the basis of the civilian use of force continuum.

CONCLUSION
In conclusion, if you are a concealed carrier, or if you open carry or carry in a constitutional carry state, or even if you just have a gun for home defense, you should actively start preparing your daily routines and actions for avoidance of areas that you feel might have a higher probability of placing you in a potentially dangerous situation.


You should start actively practicing situational awareness and often use visualization techniques to assist you in determining things that are out of the ordinary and could lead to potentially dangerous situations.


You should also attempt to remove any ambiguity and use your intuition, or instincts, to always attempt to avoid dangerous situations.


You should be able to articulate any physical limitations or discrepancies, such as age, size, strength, that exist in the event you ever find yourself in a self defense situation where deadly force may be unavoidable.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jun 24, 2018 3:13 pm

Law 9: Win through your Actions, Never through Argument
Any momentary triumph you think gained through argument is really a Pyrrhic victory:
The resentment and ill will you stir up is stronger and lasts longer than any momentary change of opinion.
It is much more powerful to get others to agree with you through your actions, without saying a word. Demonstrate, do not explicate.


Learn to demonstrate the correctness of your ideas indirectly.

The problem in trying to prove a point or gain a victory through argument is that in the end you can never be certain how it affects the people you’re arguing with: They may appear to agree with you politely, but inside they may resent you.

“The truth is generally seen, rarely heard.”
– Baltasar Gracian

“Never argue. In society nothing must be discussed; give only results.”
– Benjamin Disraeli

When caught in a lie, the more emotional and certain you appear, the less likely it seems that you are lying.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 25, 2018 2:58 am

...when a situation arises we still have to battle with our ego and do battle with the 'system's demon' that perches on your back demanding to be respected by you and by others simply because you brought it 'alive' by your floor training.

It is here where the martial art style you practice for self defense...becomes your worst enemy.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 25, 2018 3:26 pm

Good post Paul.

I am sure that deep inside most of us would agree this is the best way to live life, especially when more 'reality education' points to the likelihood of our super ego[that develops thru martial arts training even more nefariously] being at risk to get smashed to bits in any confrontation, assumed skills notwithstanding.

You may recall what happened to Al Ford's son, Joshua, and his girl friend.

Josh had become a pretty good Uechi-ka...and very possibly had felt secure in his powers in this nasty world we live in, without any tactical training.

So one night in NY, out with his girl in some bar, he is befriended by another couple and then invited to their apartment to hang out for another drink after the bar closed.

You might remember that after their disappearance, they were eventually found cut to pieces wrapped in plastic bags and tossed into a dumpster down the street.

Look at some of the 'tough guys' who used to post on my forum over the last 20+ years...using it as a convenient platform to tell the world how tough they were...how well they could fight for real...how superior their 'system' was compared to Uechi etc.,
and how some of them eventually got pretty serious beatings just for being martial ass*holes.

Like I said, any martial art, has its own rapacious demons hiding/waiting to emerge and wrap their tentacles around the martial artist who thinks he has conquered his vulnerabilities because he can do a strong sanchin, or some other 'hit the Michelin man' moves.

For some people, and we all must be careful, the practice of martial arts is the same as practicing to die. And we have seen the so many examples of it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 25, 2018 3:45 pm

What we all need to learn[from Rory]
Rory Miller’s work illuminates the most crucial part of what martial arts leave aside, violence and the context in which it takes place in the modern world.

I say the most crucial part because it’s not excluded because it’s irrelevant; it’s left out because it’s impossible shun safety / encourage violence without the practice devolving into a last man standing competition.

(FYI: If you’re saying, “Man, the martial art I study is completely street realistic,” then you need this book more than anyone.)

While it’s important to have safety in a training environment and, therefore, true violence must be prohibited (simulated, but not carried out), it’s important to understand violence so that one can prepare one’s mind for it and train oneself to recognize various types of violence so that one knows the best approach to avoid a bad outcome.

One doesn’t want to end up wondering “how could this happen” as one is bleeding out on the ground as martial artists from a range of styles have experienced.

I’m not saying martial arts aren’t valuable, and I don’t think Miller is either (he’s long practiced them, as have I.) While martial arts may not prepare one perfectly for a violent conflict, they move one in the right direction.

The only real downside is if one allows oneself to be deluded into thinking one is going to roll through waves of enemies without a scratch like Jet Li or Steven Seagal on the silver screen.

That’s why it’s important not only to read such a book as this, but to give serious thought to changing the narrative that plays out in one’s mind about the nature of violence so as to move it away from movie / sport fighting towards an approach that is most likely to get one and one’s loved ones out alive.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 25, 2018 3:48 pm

The book consists of seven chapters, plus front and back matter. The first chapter introduces two matrices as ways to frame one’s thoughts on the conflict.

The first, the tactical matrix, looks at different types of attacks one might experience (eg. surprise ambush through preemptive attack) relative to allowable use of force (can one legitimately injure or kill one’s opponent?)

The second, the strategic matrix, considers the various types of combative endeavors (e.g. self-defense, duel, sport, combat/military operations) and there goals, approaches, and dangers.

Chapter two is entitled, “How to Think,” and the emphasis is on “to think.” The central lesson is to not take ideas on faith, particularly ideas about the nature of violence from people who haven’t experienced it—particularly when those ideas seem to run counter to reality.

Because violence is such a rarity, it is a subject for which there is a great disconnect between expertise and experience. (i.e. Chances are your plumber has unclogged tens to thousands of drains, but also that the person teaching you knife disarms has never been in a single knife fight.)

The chapter considers the various fallacies and how they can be resistant to destruction. Emphasis is given to understanding your goals, making them realistic, and having a pragmatic path to achieving them.

The take-away quote is, “Do not let yourself be crippled by something that only exists in your mind.” The chapter ends by looking at decision-making at the speed of a fight, which is pretty quick.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jun 25, 2018 5:14 pm

Chapter four describes the various types of individuals with whom one might find oneself engaged in a violent altercation.

This is an important topic because the path to a best outcome varies depending upon the nature of the criminal, and so one’s ability to differentiate types of predator and to know how to best deal with each is as essential a skill as knowing the technical nuances of a punch or choke.


I think this is the most crucial component to assimilate in any training we do, because if we don't we will be in for a shocking surprise...

The destructive thinking of so many of us who practice, is to believe we can take on all comers and we seek to reinforce that illusion every time we step on the floor...yet there is that 'little man' perched on your shoulders that continues to whisper in your ear...'well may be this time you won't be able to get it up'...

...and you find yourself at the end of a knife cutting your throat...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 26, 2018 1:13 pm

Chapter two is entitled, “How to Think,” and the emphasis is on “to think.” The central lesson is to not take ideas on faith, particularly ideas about the nature of violence from people who haven’t experienced it—particularly when those ideas seem to run counter to reality.



It is a book that once bought it becomes part of your training...which really means you must read and reread it as you train ... especially if you teach self defense which essentially is what we do every-time we get on the floor.

The self defense implication of the style [any style] is clear as a bell.

And you don't want to sound like an idiot when suggesting ways to stay safe with what you are teaching...a macho BS approach without a strategic tactical of application...can be very destructive to students as we have seen in the real life examples you keep on reading on this forum.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 26, 2018 1:33 pm

The fifth chapter examines training approaches, and how the typical martial arts education leaves one with blind-spots and built-in flaws.

The chapter begins by looking at the many ways in which martial arts make modifications from realistic conditions in order to be safe.

Most martial artists realize that they are training techniques or drilled responses into their subconscious so that their bodies can respond automatically--without the need for [slow] conscious thought--during a conflict.

However, there’s a further assumption that the unrealistic parts of that movement (e.g. slowness or avoiding vulnerable targets) will go away under real life conditions.

In an earlier chapter, there was a discussion of the fact that attacks are usually faster, harder, at closer range, and more surprising than expected (Miller calls it the four basic truths), and this chapter considers some ways that one can prepare for those realities.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 26, 2018 1:40 pm

The sixth chapter considers how one can make self-defense work. It should be pointed out that this isn’t just about how to engage in the fight, but also how to stay out of a fight or get away from it as quickly as is possible. There’s also a discussion of set rules for determining when one must fight.

This is the type of notion that one must think about ahead of time, because one can’t expect to think clearly once the adrenaline has been dumped into one’s system.

The remainder of the chapter explores how one is most likely to get out of an altercation alive once the fight has become inevitable.


It will be the not thinking clearly that will kill us, as we have seen in the Alex Gong case...I mean really...what was he 'thinking' when he ran out of the studio with boxing gloves on and giving chase to a vehicle on foot with an unknown adversary in it?

You may think you are going to win a fight until suddenly a blade or a gun materializes, and bang you are dead...Alex Gong will never awaken from that moment of stupor...moments before death.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 26, 2018 1:46 pm

I found a lot of valuable food for thought in this book. The author includes many stories (sometimes funny and sometimes disturbing) that help to make the lessons memorable and poignant. Tables, charts, and the occasional photograph are used to illustrate points as well.


I feel that without this type of knowledge, we have no business teaching self defense on the floor.

Still, most teachers will shrug their shoulders and will never read the book...it is because the 'demons' waiting in ambush in the style, are preventing 'common sense' to disturb their prey.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:59 am

Law 10: Infection: Avoid the Unhappy and Unlucky
You can die from someone else’s misery – emotional states are as infectious as disease.
You may feel you are helping the drowning man but you are only precipitating your own disaster.
The unfortunate sometimes draw misfortune on themselves; they will also draw it on you. Associate with the happy and fortunate instead.

Humans are extremely susceptible to the moods, emotions, and even the ways of thinking of those with whom they spend their time.

How can you protect yourself against such insiduous viruses?

The answer lies in judging people on the effects they have on the world and not on the reasons they give for their problems.

Infectors can be recognized by the misfortune they draw on themselves, their turbulent past, their long line of broken relationships, their unstable careers, and the very force of their character, which sweeps you up and makes you lose your reason.


Be forewarned by these signs of an infector; learn to see the discontent in their eye. Most important of all, do not take pity. Do not enmesh yourself in trying to help.
The infector will remain unchanged, but you will be unhinged.


Never associate with those who share your defects – they will reinforce everything that holds you back. Only create associations with positive affinities.

Make this a rule of life and you will benefit more than from all the therapy in the world.


My long time readers will remember a few of such 'infectors' who had made themselves a 'home' here on my forum...and all the misery and acrimony that they brought along with them. Fortunately, they are all gone now as sooner or later they showed their true colors and they were either cannon balled into cyber space or dissolved by their own inner poisons.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 28, 2018 2:03 pm

SUV Attack

This will really sober up all who think can stop any attacker with the karate stuff we practice.

By a road rager in Miami...

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/ ... 67569.html

This should illustrate the point I keep on making about it's all about the type of adversary you are likely to face that determines if any of your skills/techniques/conditioning/etc., you think are so 'lethal' will have any chance at working.

The attack you see should remind you of a charging bull out to kill the bullfighter...

You see here a Matador killed by a charging bull...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BGonopGo3k

The type of attack by that madman, if you are caught outside the SUV...would kill you.

Not a time for the block and counter drills if you want to make it alive...

That is a time to 'fix bayonets' and keep on working on getting off line so you can flank such an attack if there is any chance at dealing with it...which even with a .45 pistol in your hand is questionable.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BGonopGo3k
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jun 29, 2018 3:34 am

The 'all Macho' karate people don't want to watch stuff like this and don't want to hear about offline drills...because the have been dreaming for such a long time...
https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/ ... 67569.html

it is like Rory when he writes
'The dream is damned and dreamer too if dreaming's all that dreamers do.'


If you want someone stop from injuring you and he started first, you have to move with maximum efficiency.
You have to make each action serve all your goals : protect yourself, damage the threat_ better your position_ worsen his_Each move...everytime.
Rory

There are many, many people who disdain off line drills...the first problem is they don't understand violence...the second, and a real one...they are slugs on their feet...they can't move their body mass quick enough and this is what will kill them sanchin or no sanchin.

The clips I posted about the madman charging and punching the SUV and the one where the bullfighter gets killed in the ring...is going to stay in your psyche for a long time as you get back on the floor thinking your Uechi has made you invincible.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BGonopGo3k
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