Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:13 pm

A good man

Gradually build up to full power shots and pressurize yourself. You will find how difficult stopping punches really is, you will probably stop more with your face when you start off.

Other tips to consider when facing an aggressor and you feel he may attempt a punch are as follows:

always try and maintain arms length distance, this will give you some chance of seeing the blow.

Try not to get your mind or attention distracted otherwise you will be sucker punched.

Don’t go into stupid pre-fight rituals like standing head to head or splaying arms, hands on hips, puffing out the chest.

These actions leave you no hope of defending whatsoever.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:16 pm

Careful in closing the distance with anyone on the street.

The hand that punches you may have a blade in it...and his wretched bodily fluids are there like a cobra bite waiting for you.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:20 pm

A good man

Also be aware of the pre-punch signs. Opponent may be wildly abusive, finger point, and attempt to prod or push you.

May suddenly go quiet, have a vacant stare or look this may be difficult to spot on some gorillas individuals, blood red face, veins protruding from temples or neck, clenching of fists, drop shoulders, draw back of arm, shift of bodyweight.

These are just some of the many different ;approaches.

Be aware of these things they are just as essential, if not; more than your physical responses.

Remember the street thug will not stance up and start dancing around like Sugar Ray Leonard.

These are not the things you should be looking for, or base all your punch training on.


I see the most glaring mistake as practicing for self defense the same way we practice for sparring/consensual fighting.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:24 pm

Where will you mostly be attacked/accosted?

We know the problem with road rage today...so you want to stay in your car and not get out to 'talk' with someone who wants to kill you, but then
You may be accosted in a telephone box, toilet cubicle, stairway, car etc.

It probably wont be of your choice.

You must accept these things and take them on board.

In closing, the best defense is attack, and if you can launch a pre-emptive move even when you feel your life is threatened, do it, don’t delay and find yourself on the back foot.

But if something goes wrong and you can't then by following the concepts outlined in this article you will be able to keep your head.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:28 pm

the best defense is attack, and if you can launch a pre-emptive move even when you feel your life is threatened, do it, don’t delay and find yourself on the back foot.


But be extremely careful who you try to pre-empt...

you have no guarantee that your Uechi strike of doom will stop anybody...you may just make someone very mad, who now has an excuse to kill you.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:33 pm

f.Channell »

Trias Sensei,
I have 2 of his books. I loaned out a 3rd and shouldn't have.
There is a lot of interesting stuff in his books.

A boxer turned martial artist.
I'll look for a good quote to add.
Fred
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:36 pm

f.Channell »

Quote:
Karate, which clearly surpasses all the other martial arts, must be considered in its final form and spirit as an expression of man's indomitable will to survive advertisity in the most direct and self-reliant manner possible, requiring only that which nature gave him-a mind and body rigorously disciplined as an inseparable entity.

"The Pinnacle of Karate"
Robert A. Trias

The book is excellent with 12 different sparring and scenario training drills,
including ground fighting and sparring against weapons.

Kumite's practiced while moving forwards and at angles, ocassionally even stepping backwards.

Pressure points, advice on diet for martial artists, just loaded with information.
Master Trias was cross-training in Judo and jujitsu 30+ years before it became popular to do so.

Never met him, but the info in his book is good stuff.

The USKA a huge organization gone after the passing of Master Trias.
I have a shodan certificate from them myself.
If you ever see the books buy them.
F.

Sans Peur Ne Obliviscaris
www.hinghamkarate.com
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:36 pm

Yes met him in Chicago. A bear of a man.

Image

We also see George Mattson in this shot ...


Trias is the big man on the right. You also see Bruce Lee in front of George.

In 1964 Trias staged another World Karate Championship in Chicago. That same year two new tournaments burst onto the scene: Ed Parker’s International Karate Championships in Long Beach, California, and Jhoon Rhee’s U.S. National Karate Championships in Washington, D.C. Parker’s tournament boasted a memorable demonstration by a then-unknown Chinese stylist named Bruce Lee.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:15 pm

Old tournaments were like real fights[almost]

Historians have called the period from 1963 to 1970 the “blood and guts” era in American karate.

It was a time of relatively unrestrained brutality, brought to an end when a segment of the sport split off to become kick-boxing.

Today the rules regarding “light contact” are enforced at tournaments, but usually only with regard to the head.

Punches and kicks to the body are often executed with full force, especially at the brown and black belt levels, even though they usually do not need to be in order to score.

At the highest levels, however, the referees like to hear a solid “thump” on a point scored to the chest. Fighters are expected to be in sufficiently good condition to tolerate such impacts.

Many different karate schools, styles and federations sponsor tournaments today. Kempo, Shotokan, Wado-ryu, Shuri-ryu, Isshin-ryu and others offer relatively traditional competitions that are open to other traditional styles.

American Freestyle and other taekwondo-oriented organizations offer tournaments putting more emphasis on kicking techniques, showmanship and personal creative expression (usually under UTK rules).

Kyokushin-ryu tournaments are still brutal and full-contact, as always.

The big national championships, of which there are several, offer high excitement and magnificent exhibitions of talent that will inspire any martial artist.

Big karate tournaments are almost never televised; they must be experienced in person.

Regardless of your specialties, there will usually be much of interest for the spectator as well as the competitor.
________________________________________________________________________
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:21 pm

The Madison Square Garden 'All American' hosted by Henry Cho, was particularly brutal...I was on the Mattson team there and saw couple people severely hurt.

We won some initial matches only to be threatened to a beating in the locker room downstairs...we had to go there as a group not individually for safety concerns...

Then there was a riot on the floor.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 11, 2018 11:54 am

Also in 1964, Mahn Suh Park sponsored the first open tournament in Philadelphia, the Globe Tae Gyun Championships. The following year, Jhoon Rhee persuaded Wide World of Sports to film and broadcast segments of his U.S. National Karate Championships; unfortunately, the finals were so brutal and bloody that the show’s producers ended up broadcasting only a few clips, and then avoided karate entirely for the next nine years.


It seemed almost like entering a 'Kill Zone' in those days...lots of very bad injuries...teachers of different styles challenging one another on the floor...it proves the point that the human race, even with karate, is nothing but a virus on this planet.

Karate made it worse as it compounded the underlying emotional instability of some people.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:30 pm

Attorney Andrew Branca: The law of self defense

Your voice is a powerful defensive
weapon. For one thing it might attract
assistance and witnesses, both of which
are good for good-guy cases of self defense.
For another, it can help strip
away the ambiguity from a possible
threat and allow you to act decisively in
self-defense.

Yell at that guy to stay
back, and maybe he will—which would
be great. But if he continues to close
distance, as you’re screaming at him
not to, you now have evidence that you
can articulate of conduct of his that is
consistent with being a threat and
inconsistent with someone just
happening to be going about their day.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:37 pm

Atty Andrew Branca

Mistakes
6. Not Identifying Exculpatory Evidence

Good guy cases of self-defense
don’t tend to get into trouble
because there’s too much
evidence in a case, they tend to
get into trouble when there’s too
little evidence and the claim of
self-defense looks speculative or
fabricated.

Don’t let the evidence
and witnesses who can support
your claim of self-defense
disappear simply because some
dude on the internet told you to
“never say anything to the police.”

You need that exculpatory
evidence and witnesses. If the bad
guy’s knife isn’t in evidence it doesn’t exist for legal purposes. And that knife is
why you were compelled to shoot him. That knife is your legal justification for
deadly defensive force. Make sure it’s not overlooked as evidence.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:41 pm

Being a hero


Coming to the defense of strangers is
always a touchy subject (defending
friends and family are a different
matter entirely). Many people feel a
moral imperative to intervene on
behalf of those they perceive as victims
of predatory violence. I’m not here to
tell anyone that such a decision is
wrong, but I do urge everyone to make
such decisions in an informed way.
Understand that any fight involves a
greater-than-zero risk of death and a
greater-than-zero risk of going to jail
for much of the rest of your life. Also,
will that woman you ‘rescued’ from her
abusive SO suddenly realize she’ll lose her sugar daddy to jail if she testifies
truthfully, and perhaps testify less than truthfully? Be careful!
ō
Law of Self Defense, LLC is an educational and legal consulting enterprise
focusing exclusively on American use-of-force law, and is led by Attorney Andrew
Branca, an internationally recognized subject-matter

8. Lacking a Non-Lethal Defense

The FBI/DOJ tell us that we’re five times
more likely to face a simple assault or
battery (a non-deadly force attack) than
an aggravated assault or battery (a
deadly force attack). In most cases a
gun is not the legally permitted response
to a non-deadly force attack.

But when
a person’s only defensive tool is that
gun, the fear and stress of even a non deadly
force attack often compels them
to pull that deadly-force response out.

Because they weren’t facing a deadly
force threat that could justify such a
response, they often end up charged
with felony aggravated assault, even if
they never fire a shot.

Have some non-deadly means of defense: OC spray, a
Taser, martial arts, something. Don’t leave yourself with only a hammer, when
the threat you face will only rarely be nail.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:44 pm

Your ego
We all have egos, and none of us likes
to be insulted—especially not in front
of family or friends.

But the moment
you get engaged in a confrontation
you’ve just incurred those greater than-
zero risks of death and jail I’ve
already discussed.


There are
circumstances where incurring those
risks is worth it—for example, if there’s
an imminent threat to your own life or
the life of someone whom you feel you
have a duty to protect.

But is mere ego
worth incurring those tremendous
risks? Remember ‘sticks-and-stones
may break my bones’? Before you get
into that confrontation, make sure the stakes are really worth the risks.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 53196
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

PreviousNext

Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests