Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:20 pm

The subject can generally be expected to recall:

a. Type of weapon (handgun, knife) but not the characteristics of the weapon.
b. General information about the suspect.
c. General details about the encounter.

These interviews should probably be tape recorded and transcribed, since the residual sympathetic nervous system effects on fine motor control will often make hand written reports illegible.

Of course, during this and all other interviews, the interviewers should make a conscious effort not to contaminate the process by suggesting ideas about the crime or the suspect to any witnesses.

The interviews should be conducted on an individual basis, and reasonable efforts should be made to ensure that the subject is isolated from other sources of information (such as news reports or other witnesses) until the next interview, which will take place after a good night's sleep.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:22 pm

Every effort should be made to ensure that the subject receives a healthy night's sleep after the incident. Drugs which are administered to the subject (sleeping pills, anesthesia, etc.) should be held to a minimum and should be screened by a physician for potential impact on memory retention.

3. After the first sleep period (generally 24 hours later) the subject should be interviewed again, and the subject can be expected to remember the majority of the details regarding the incident and to refine many of the fine points. In the case of law enforcement officers a written report at this time may be appropriate, and it should be understood that the officer may add significantly to his or her earlier statements.

4. A group interview or group debriefing should then be conducted as soon as reasonably possible after completion of the second set of individual interviews. The memories related in the second interview may be the most pure, but the subject will almost certainly not recover all available memory of the incident until exposed to the retrieval cues that can be provided by other witnesses.

It is important that the subject get a chance to formally complete this process in an environment in which each individual is required to completely relate their experiences and observations.

Very often this environment will create comments such as, "So that's what that was, I saw that too!" The ultimate goal of this process should be to completely reconstruct the entire critical incident.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:23 pm

This kind of group debriefing was pioneered by Brigadier General S.L.A. Marshall in WWII where it was found to be extraordinarily effective at achieving a complete picture of what occurred in combat situations (Marshall, 1978).

Recently the U.S. Army has created Combat Stress Teams which are assigned at brigade level in every combat unit. These teams have the responsibility to conduct post-combat debriefings of the sort pioneered by Marshall.

It has been demonstrated that in this group interview environment, individuals are very careful to tell exactly the truth, even when it reflects poorly upon themselves, since they know that others are there who can catch them at any misrepresentation of the event (Williams, F.D., 1990).

Thus, the post-combat group interview provides the most accurate and truthful information, in the best possible environment to trigger recall of important data. It also allows the maximum possible training and learning value and the applications of lessons learned which will assist officers in the execution of their duties in the years to come.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:25 pm

But, perhaps the most important aspect of this group debriefing is that it is considered to be the single most powerful therapeutic tool in preventing post-traumatic stress disorder (Belenke, G., 1996).

The moral requirement to provide the therapeutic aspects of this vital group debriefing has been essentially acknowledged by the U.S. military, and law enforcement agencies are probably under increasing legal liability for any post-traumatic responses which would occur among law enforcement officers who have not been given this opportunity.

Because of this mental health aspect, it is reasonable that mental health professionals should be present during group interviews. However, the overall objectives of the mental health practitioner, the prosecutor, the internal affairs officer, and the criminal investigator are all the same in this interview: to simply find out what happened.

One experienced individual should be placed in charge of the interview, and he or she should guide the group toward the objective of reconstructing the incident and extracting all available information. Mental health practitioners should address any additional requirements in subsequent group or individual sessions.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:26 pm

The only negative aspect of the group debrief is the potential for contamination in the reconstruction process. This danger is slight, but, nevertheless it must be acknowledged that there is potential for individuals to accept the memories of others (which may or may not be correct) as their own in the reconstruction process.

It must be pointed out that this is inevitable in any memory reconstruction, and by formalizing this group process it can be ensured that the individuals will be basing their reconstructions on the best possible information.

5. To be absolutely thorough in the information collection process, it is recommended that a second group interview be conducted 48-to-72 hours after the incident.

This will permit one or two nights' sleep to process the data presented in the group debriefing, and should therefore provide an opportunity for the most thorough and complete memories to come forward.

At this time, the possibility for contamination is greater, but if the process has been properly handled, the contamination should be minimal, and far less than would have occurred if this overall process had not been followed systematically.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:28 pm

Conclusion

The overall application of a scientific understanding of memory processes in a law enforcement environment has potential for tremendous payoff. From better quality eyewitness accounts, to lessons learned and applied, to the long term mental health of the participants, the payoff is simply enormous.

The price for failing to apply these lessons is equally enormous, and the victims of such a failure will inevitably include citizens, officers, the community and, ultimately, Justice.<


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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:35 pm

Why you should exhale with a strike

Well, at camp we saw a breathing demonstration in Uechi, by Master He, all China ’99 Wushu champion.

He did Sanchin strikes like thunder and lightning, and breathing out with the strike, and when asked by GEM sensei about it after having witnessed the Uechi method of breathing “between strikes”, he said that it is best to breathe out for better “energy transfer” _ with the strike and not in between strikes.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 16, 2018 11:48 pm

What I Want

RA Miller »

I would like a Forum so secure that I could write about things that really bothered me, without waiting for three years to elapse from the time of the incident for legal reasons.

I'd like a forum where you knew, clearly, who was a technician, who was a tactician, who was a strategist and who had "seen the elephant"... and the people who were just fantasizing, no matter their paper qualifications, couldn't log on.

A place where you could write something from experience, something you knew was just the tip of an iceberg, and people would respond with more clues and insights- give you a way to follow it up and learn more.

Where no one would write a mishmash of Debecker/Strong/McYoung/Sidle...and pass it off as his own insight.

Van,this is the closest I've found, but the world still feels very empty.

Rory
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:07 am

Road rage this

High road rubber

Why the f*uck did you stop? There's no one in front of you. What the f*uck are you looking at? A car? An accident? They're pretty scary aren't they?

Do you feel like being involved in one yourself, #####, because when you stop suddenly like that, people behind you have to brake suddenly to avoid hitting you.

Yeah, I know that maybe they shouldn't be riding so close to your stagnant ass but I've got news for you, they do! They'll ride that **** within inches of causing a catastrophe in hopes of making you angry or maybe annoyed enough to move, especially if you are in the left lane.

And so you should move. Get the f*uck out of the way, drive faster, but whatever you do don't stop suddenly to look at an accident, moron. Are you sick?

Do you like blood? Do twisted smoldering metals, broken glass, and burned skin put happy thoughts in your head? Decapitations, mangled carcasses, emergency tracheotomies, am I turning you on?

No? Then what the hell are you staring at? Are you scared because you never saw anything like that before or do you just want the scoop?

Are you that f*ucking nosey that you can't even focus on your own life? If you stop like that with an eighteen-wheeler on your back you may not be able to tell your story.

Or if you do maybe it will be the one explaining how you lost your left arm and the use of your legs. These are the pleasant things I think about when I see people like you driving like that.

Sometimes I hope to see drivers like you end up in accidents like that just so I can laugh at how your ignorance has taught you an important lesson. How do you like that?

How do you like knowing that drivers like me are on the road? Believe me there are worse people than this. You should be more careful next time. Don't be such a rubbernecking #####.

Wait a minute! What in the hell are you doing now? You're driving next to someone at the same speed. What kind of s*hit is that?

There are two lanes; the left one is for passing. Do you see that pedal on the right? That one makes you go faster, genius.

If you're not going to go faster, slow down and get back in the right lane. Get behind the car going the same speed as you, not next to it!

Do you even know where you are? Man, if I could just get to work without being killed by you idiots that would be just great.

I see people like you every day and I am not surprised at how many accidents there are each year. I'm not interested in these accidents. I don't stop to look at them. The sight of blood usually makes me lightheaded.

Most of the time when I'm driving and I see lights up ahead I get angry. I'm mad because that probably means that some idiot on the road has just ruined some poor person's day or even life. Someone is always at fault.

When I see accidents I focus on the people around me. I watch all you rubberneckers and wait for you to f*uck up. I scramble to get away from you as you drift into my lane and come within inches of my bumper.

I wonder how I can cause you to end up on the side of the road also and give you the best possible view of this tragedy you seek. If only I had a bigger car....
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 2:42 am

Dominick Mattero>>

It’s the eve of
September 11 and I’m a New Yorker.

But I'll describe an incident I was in last summer.

I was coming home in the middle of the night on the subway when three
black guys got on my car and got belligerent with the two other
passengers in the same car as me.

They put this Mexican guy in a headlock
and started slapping his head. When I saw this I got mad and they saw me
sitting at the end of the car glaring at them, so they come towards me.

The f*ucked up thing was I realized that all three were hearing impaired
(deaf!). Their grunts made me even more scared than I was (I was angry
but scared, I mean three guys all individually bigger than me I was
scared.. my adrenaline jacked up and I got nauseous).

I couldn’t remove myself because the individual subway cars are locked in
NYC subways. Your trapped with these guys until the next stop and this
train was going express!! Mixed with the nausea was my vow that no one was
going roll me like when I was younger.. F*uck that!

Anger or fear of being a victim..Humiliated?? I shifted my knapsack into my left hand like a
shield and started smiling at these punks.

I even laughed even though
they couldn’t hear me and made the sign of the cross with my free hand and
stuck it into my pocket where my box cutter was already with the blade out
(It looks like a stick of chewing gum but the upper half is a slot where
you put a disposable razor).

I’ve always carried a blade when I know I'll
be out late at night. They saw my hand in my pocket and my f*ucked up grin
and decided to grunt at me from five feet away. My plan if they attacked?

I think it was just slash away at their faces and arms, they had long
arms (i don’t mean that as racist they just did).

This went on for what
seemed like forever. I was like when was the next f*ucking stop?

At the
next stop I thought of getting off but decided to wait to see what they
were going to do. Luckily they got off and looked at me with this strange
half smile/half scowl.

When the door closed and I knew I was in the clear
I let out a breath and started shaking. I couldn’t sit down for the rest
of the ride; I paced back and forth and struck up a conversation with the
Mexican guy whose face showed his shame at his helplessness. "

I couldn't
do nothing, there were too many of them"

I didn't feel right saying anything because the truth was I didn't help
him, I only acted when I was threatened. Some story, no violence just
animals posturing at each other.

But guess what that's almost every case
, we humans are actually cowards at heart, we need numbers or weapons to
instill our dominance over those we know are weaker.



This realization is
what makes me look at most martial arts as fantasy for adults who think
there actually going to serve justice or change the world with kicks or open
handed exotic looking blows.


I mean no offense as I’m generalizing but
that’s how I feel in the raw of it, as raw and unpleasant as that
experience.

Dominick Mattero
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 4:59 am

2Green »

Man, that's a GREAT post. NM
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:00 am

TSDguy »

*Shudder*

Number 4 into the Bronx late at night. That's a scary feeling.

You ARE in a world of your own and no one is there to help you but yourself.

Man! What a feeling of helplessness.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:07 am

TSD,

I remember you mentioning your Bronx experience before.

I'd be interested in hearing more about it, how it felt inside, the nature of the threat and how you coped with it.

Images of the movie "the warriors" come to mind. The nights scenes were terrifying in their isolation.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:09 am

TSDguy »

I'm not thinking of a particular event; I was never physically attacked.

But the scary part is that, like a jury, there are usually about 12 people on the line that decide if you live or die.

I just kept my eyes in vacant stare at the wall across from me and tried to ignore the gang members pacing around me.

I remember trying to figure out what the HELL I was going to do if they did anything, and I remember not being able to come up with anything.

The first story is so right, there is no getting off once you get on, and the NYC subway line is gargantuan so don't plan on a stop anytime soon.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:18 am

This also brings to mind the movie 'the incident'

The Incident is a 1967 American neo-noir thriller film written by Nicholas E. Baehr (based on his teleplay Ride with Terror, which had been previously adapted as a 1963 television film)[2] and directed by Larry Peerce. The film stars Tony Musante and Martin Sheen (in his first film role) as two street hoods who terrorize 14 passengers sharing a New York City Subway car


If you haven't seen it yet, be sure you do...as you will learn about yourself in ways you still cannot imagine, martial arts or not....

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