Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:26 am

Darren Laur>>
GENERAL STRATEGY WHEN FIGHTING MULTIPLES:

· Psychological battle is as important as physical battle
· If possible identify the leader and take him out of the fight quickly and decisively. This will create a new leader, by destroying the old one- see if anyone else wants to assume the role

· If you can’t take out the leader right away, take away his leadership role by showing the rest of the group that he can not protect them. Make the strong link psychologically ineffective- keep him at bay will defeating others

· Create a weak link by injuring an attacker but leaving him standing so that he may be used against the group later on
· Create a psychologically devastating and overwhelming visible injury to those you attack to disempower the group

· The use of real or improvised weapons should be used


· The first few seconds are critical in establishing psychological control
· CONTINUED MOVEMENT is a must. If you remain stationary the pack will triangulate


· Don’t be predictable move and strike erratically and viciously to the vision, wind and limbs of opponents using gross motor skills. Strike the person you are not looking at


Use the principle of S.C.A.R. (Screening, Cracking, And Re-directing) to your advantage:

SCREENING:

Use your attackers against each other. Cause them to get in each other’s way. Cause them to provide protection for you by being obstacles to others effectively attacking you (shield yourself from blows and attacks from others)


CRACKING:

When tactically feasible, move between your attackers, striking as you do so. This tactic will allow you to move into a more desirable position for attack while forcing your opponents to adjust to you.

Position is often more important than distance. You want to be as efficient and productive as possible while forcing your attackers into less desirable positions


RE-DIRECTING:

Use your attackers momentum and direction against them. You do not have to make devastating hits with each engagement.

Instead, re-direct your attackers into less desirable and or damaging positions such as walls, tables, chairs, each other.

Let inanimate objects cause damage to them or let them cause damage to each other


Remember that while using the principals of SCAR, you want to be causing physical and psychological damage at the same time.


Remember that fighting multiple opponents is chaotic, and that you want to cause the chaos without becoming part of it. It is my opinion, that a multiple opponent confrontation is a “DEADLY FORCE” encounter.

Why, it has been my experience as an LEO that those that fall victim to these swarmings end up seriously injured, or dead.


I have trained to fight the WOLF PACK, but I doubt the Wolf PACK has trained to fight cohesively against me. This is a tactical advantage that I can use to make a less desirable situation more desirable, thus giving me the “WIN” mindset and attitude.


Strength and Honor

Darren Laur
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:29 am

When you fight anybody, especially multiples, you must recognize when you are in the 'kill zone'...and make every effort to angle away and place your self in safer positions preparatory to getting away...always disappear from the 'kill zone'

Don't do kanchiwa bunkai on the street or you die quick.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:31 am

Darren Laur »

2green:

IMO, modern realists (such as Blauer, Dimitri, Messina, and myself), who understand the reality of this very serious topic, who utilize force on force training with combative suits, should be sought out for this type of training.

Many of the more traditional martial arts, such as Aikido, depend upon "consent" when dealing with this issue, and are therefore non-realistic.

As I have always stated, there is no such thing as the ultimate fighting style or system. Each have their strengths and weaknesses. Identify what those weaknesses are and go elsewhere to strengthen them.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:33 am

Darren Laur »

"None of the "relaxed" fighting movements some love to write about. The reality is totally different."



Those that teach and write about staying "relaxed" in such circumstances are not teaching self protection, but rather, self defeat.

SSR issues are a reality that many traditionalists refuse to acknowledge, when providing training specific to the real and ugly world of the street!!!!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:39 am

I also find it very funny when listening to some teacher in the safety of a dojo telling his students they must relax in a real fight.

They don't seem to understand what the SSR does to the body and what must be done in its grip.

That usually comes from someone who has never been in a real fight much less an open tournament facing fighters who can take their heads off.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:41 am

Doctor Peter A. Levine indicates that people and other mammals have three instinctive and biological responses to danger: fight, flight and freeze. When we sense danger, our nervous system begins a four-stage process of arousal. In the first stage, our muscles tense, and we begin the orienting response by looking for the source of danger.



One of the problems, when teaching a student the "relaxed" way of striking for maximum power delivery [ which is of course the best way] is that in those first moments that the student needs that "relaxed" state, his body, locked in fight or flight, will not allow him to access "relaxed power" !

This has been a major issue when debriefing people who have been there.[survival fights on the street]

Question is why are we programmed to become tense by nature?

Is it really a survival mechanism or one that will get us extinct?

Darren,

What have your studies developed as to the why and how best to use this "tension" ?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:42 am

Darren Laur »

Mr Van Canna:

In my research on SSR, what I was able to ascertain about tension based upon fight, flight or hypervigilance is:

· It allows for the body to come to an abrupt standstill very quickly, thus preventing predators to pick up on movement (think of a dear caught in headlights here)
· It allows the body to protect itself from impact

I hope this answers your question.

Teaching any combative motor skill that is not “congruent” with this Survival Stress Response, is just plain negligent, as it CAN NOT be overridden if caught in a sudden and spontaneous surprise attack., as some instructors and martial arts believe.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:47 am

Darren Laur>>

What this means to me is that in an unexpected spontaneous attack, if you are training motor skills that are not congruent with what the amygdala will cause the body to do, more specifically the “Somatic Reflex Potentiation” no matter how well trained the response, it will be overridden.

But many in the combatives field believe that we can make a trained response the dominant response through repetition and training using stimulus/response training methods.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:51 pm

Darren Laur>>


So what is the correlation between the neuroscientific research of fear, and it relationship to survival skills training?

1. The brain has been “hard-wired” to deal with the emotion of fear

2. One pathway is known as the “high road” in which action can be based on conscious will and thought. This pathway appears to take effect during “progressive” types of fear stimuli. Here a combatives student will be able to apply stimulus/response type training using the OODA model having regards to gross motor skills and Hick’s Law

3. A second pathway is known as the “low road” which is triggered by a spontaneous/ unexpected attack. Here, the brain will take control of the body with an immediate “protective reflex” (downloaded directly to the brain stem where all of our reflexive responses to danger are stored), which will override any system of combat that bases its ability on “cognitively” applying a physical response.

This is especially true if the trained response is not congruent with the “protective reflex” (this is exactly what I observed in the 1992 video study that I conducted and mentioned earlier in this article)


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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:55 pm

AlanL »

The first weekend in July I attended the Multiple Assailant weekend training offered by Bill Kipp.

As I have written in a past post, the adrenaline and stress of a multiple attack scenario take all of your energy in about 30 seconds.

I can't say I felt at any time relaxed trying to take out three bulletmen attackers in 30 seconds.

A couple of key principles when facing multiple opponents standing is keep moving and don't let them surround you.

Bill teaches a simple method he calls stacking.

Keep moving so that you stack up your attackers in a line.

Then you can attack the first one in line using him as a shield from the others.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:00 pm

This is the way I practice and teach the Kanshiwa bunkai...not the way is done generally by turning your back on the opponent you just blocked and punched, supposedly stopping him, which you wont...and now you are training to remain in the 'kill zone'...

Your stopping power strikes look good in training but cannot be relied upon in a real fight, especially when you have no idea who and what your potential opponent might be.

It is this misguided 'confidence' in your stopping power strikes that will kill you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:09 pm

Panther »

Interesting discussion...

Darren's posts address issues that many never think about while training in the comfort of their known dojo environment. The Tony Blauers, Gary Khourys, Marc MacYoungs, Van Cannas, GEMs and others already realize these things... but the vast majority of "dojo-rats" don't or won't go there... simply too uncomfortable... and I, too, am not fond of thinking or training the uncomfortable... that's just a fact of human nature which those who chose to overcome gain enlightenment from.


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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:21 pm

Fighting on the street just isn't as pretty as the dojo or ring.

Gross motor fighting is about primal rage and going to the ground, it's not pretty. It's about inflicting harm fast and simple. (hurt them and take them down to finish) Your opponent plays the same game.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 10:40 pm

La fond _

My full time pedestrian status in a city plagued by pet neglect, drug dealers, and dog fighting, results in regular rottweiler, pit bull, and Doberman pinscher encounters.

Just recently in fact, I was attacked. The initial growl, emanating from behind a car, triggered the fear response. However, being an experienced dog stomper, and having been mauled by a dog as a child, the switch to anger was almost instinctive.

I controlled the anger by maintaining the “kill goal”_ I kicked for the throat but only caught the neck.

At this point the “fat city – hick owner threatened me. At this point the self control [goal orientation] became crucial. If I had initially let the anger counter-response take over I would have gone for him too.

The cool focus of the hunter battled the rage inside of me. I had been walking in the middle of the street to avoid sidewalk dogfights, and gelatin man would not let it go. I wanted to work him over as well.

When I got home and found out he had insulted my wife previously, I wanted to kill his dog and feed it to him.

The savage urges.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 17, 2018 10:45 pm

Would it surprise you if I told you that many traditionalists don’t believe the chemical cocktail will affect them, and or it does not exist in the Asian martial arts masters/culture, such as Okinawa?
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