Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:30 am

Why is this? One fundamental
reason is that if you are hit in the chest while your lungs contain air, you
are likely to become winded. Emptying your lungs avoids this danger.

It is
also said that the purpose of kihon (basic training) is to unify the mind and
body with the breath.

This is most clearly seen in kiai, of which I will have
more to say later.

In some way then, karate is underpinned with the belief
that exhalation whilst performing a technique binds the intent of mind and
body: a strong, powerful exhalation promotes the execution of a strong and
powerful technique



In Taido, there are four methods of breathing that relate to the four sce-
narios experienced by a person being attacked. Each breathing technique is
made up of two components: inhalation and exhalation. Both the inhalation
and exhalation can be performed at two speeds, quickly or slowly. The four
methods are therefore as follows:

Method

Inhalation
Exhalation

1.
Fast
Fast

2.
Fast
Slow

3.
Slow
Fast

4.
Slow
Slow


>....
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:33 am

A fast inhalation is carried out when a possible threat becomes apparent
- the taidoka inhales quickly in preparation to move. A slow inhalation is
conducted when there is no apparent threat, but the taidoka still needs to
maintain a state of awareness and readiness (zanshin).

A fast exhalation
indicates that a perceived threat is real and marks the transition into a de-
fendable position such as kamae. Conversely, a slow exhalation marks a
continued state of readiness, even though there is no immediate threat.

It should come as no surprise that fast breath is used to match a fast action,
and a slow breath is used to match a slow action. This can be experienced
by trying to perform your favourite technique at full speed and power, whilst
breathing slowly.

Deliberate and controlled breathing also promotes a state
of readiness and calmness -

If you can control the breath, you can control
the mind (think about the difficulty of acting rationally when the body is
struggling for breath).


>>>>....
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:35 am

Similarly, if you can control the mind you can control
the body (think about the conflict between mind and body that arises when
you are in the middle of a grueling run) .

Moreover these breath-mind and
mind-body relationships are transitive: If you can control the breath, you
can control the body. The ability to control the body is a core principle in
martial arts.

Kiai
The breath can be used to mirror the body’s intent. A strong, powerful
exhalation promotes a strong and powerful technique.


In addition, the use of
abdominal breathing can reinforce the body’s resolve and the ability to strike.
The natural extrapolation of these principles results in the performance of
kiai.

The physical act of kiai involves tightening the muscles of the body
(including the diaphragm) on impact, and exhaling forcibly to produce a
shout.

Kiai literally means ‘spirit convergence’ and is a state of being which
is meant to express a harmony between the body and the mind.


....>>>
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:37 am

In his
autobiography,

Funakoshi recounts a tale of the karate master Matsumura,
who once defeated an enemy using only his kiai. The physical shout of the
kiai can be used to scare the opponent, something that Musashi states as
being of great importance:


The difference between a half-hearted scream intended to scare
the enemy off and a resolute shout is the difference between brag-
ging and making a commitment to attack.

It is also said that the act of kiai causes the throat to harden - in defence
against a strike to the front of the neck
.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:49 am

The Myth of the Fully Resisting Opponent

RA Miller »

Van's forum is all about facing up to the flaws in our beliefs, the things that we think are true that may have a cost when things go bad.

We are popping the myths that we create about ourselves and our training.

I submit that if you have never had anyone try to gouge your eyes out to escape from a rear naked strangle, you've never tried the technique against a "fully resisting opponent".

The first time, I let go of the strangle to protect my eyes. The second time, I knew better.

If you've never cranked on the technique so hard and fast that you heard a "crack" from his throat, you were playing a gentleman's game, politely.

In the time it takes to put someone in a juji gatame and start to yell "Back off or I'll break his arm!" You can easily be kicked in the head three times. Maybe more. I remember the first three pretty well.

If you've felt you've hit a real opponent as hard as you can hit, take the gloves off and try again. I've known people with shattered hands to keep punching, and people with broken skulls to keep fighting.

A fully resisting opponent isn't resisting. He is acting. A pure attack with no thought of defense. He's not resisting your technique, he's trying to beat you so badly, so quickly, that you can't USE a technique.

I avoid the threads on "Uechi pointy things" because I don't know enough about Uechi to contribute. But I have once used a spear hand to the throat. It was easy.

It didn't require me to practice magic or have faith in untested complex precision techniques. It left a man who outweighed me by over a hundred pounds on his knees trying to scream and making no sound. That image still bothers me.

Train hard. Hard rolling is fun and good for you and good training. But don't pretend that either you or the other person is going all-out. You want to use the same partner tomorrow and so does he.

And don't pretend that dangerous techniques are difficult or complex. You don't avoid them because they're difficult to make work, you avoid them because you need to recycle training partners.

RA Miller
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:57 am

As Van has mentioned recently in the alley incident and as several others have shared their real life experiences, these things can happen to anyone, anytime, anywhere, and when you least expect it.

Getting everyone on board mentally is probably the first step.



This is a real problem Nick. The “mental aboard” problem.

Some will argue that it is a matter of proper training, conditioning, the so-called “confidence,” and “experience.” And all that is true up to a point.

The most common question and “complaint” we hear in the martial arts from the typical student, is how does someone conquer that paralyzing fear of:

1.Going toe to toe with potentially deadly adversaries.

2. Fear of triggering a supposedly “killing blow” to an enemy, wondering deep inside if it will in fact work or piss off the opponent more and so inviting more vicious violence, and or fear of becoming Bubba’s mistress, and or losing savings, job, house, peace of mind for the rest of one’s life.

Not really sure if there is a way to overcome these fears.

The work of Tony Blauer, Laur, Quinn, Sonnon et al, are helpful, but in the end it is more "genetic" than "manufactured"

PS_ a good example is that studies by lethal force trainers, show that most people who carry handguns and or knives for defense, will be "mentally blocked" from using such weapons, even to save their own lives.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:59 am

cxt »

RA Miller

Excellent, and kinda scary post.

My first martial arts teacher used to claim that no matter hard you train, no matter what methods you use, only a certain percentage of students will be able to "perform for real."

Still not sure I agree but your post does give me quite a bit to consider.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:02 am

Sonnon »

Great thread. I've worked to 'reframe' forms of competition from sport to BMF/Battle focus training, Kill houses, Scenario based training, et cetera, based upon the Latin root of the word: con petire or "to seek together."

There is no disguising the fact that competition is limited, nor should we want to! Who in their right mind would want to recreate EXACTLY a fight??? No one that has ever been in one, for sure.

I've written about this recently by describing combat sports as "Specific Physical Preparedness" - for people to view facing a fully resistant opponent as dynamic resistance training, no different than other resistance training (despite its more animated reality.) Here's the article if anyone's interested: Combat SPP. I always appreciate feedback!

Scott Sonnon
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:10 am

JoeLauzon »

It is saying that more realistic things that you can practice are better than things that are too deadly to practice. Somehting may be deadly, but if you cant practice it under real conditions you will never get good at it. Knowing how to do something is not being able to do it.


If you have a whole crew of people that you can just kill and have no consequences, then you can practice your deadly techniques. If you dont have all these people that you can just kill, try the controlled and "safe techniques.

My Rear naked choke will work MUCH better than your touch of death.

Joe
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:21 am

Jim De Luca
I think many martial artist are missing what should be the first step in a progressive martial art training program and that is the sporting application, aka judo, wrestling, sport karate, kickboxing, (and for some of you hard core guys vale tudo). After training in this type of "full" speed training a martial artist will have the ability to actually apply some of those "deadly techniques" if necessary.



I agree Jim. And it has always been the view of many of our great seniors that those who do not partake in such activity miss out on much of their martial development despite illusions to the contrary.

One of the benefits is the creation of a 'muscle memory' roadway to a target...while in the 'fog of war' ....
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:23 am

JoeLauzon »

Jim thats exactly what I am trying to say.

When I say these deadly strikes, I mean the type of moves that guys will say, "Oh no we cant practice that, it will kill a man.

I know how to do it, trust me, Ive been told exactly how to do it".

Well who taught it to you? Had they ever done it? Or did they learn it the same way?

Details become lost for one thing, and I would NEVER trust anything to save me that I had never personally done before... thats foolish to believe you will do it properly when it counts if you have never done it before.

Thats a gamble I wont be taking.

--Joe Lauzon
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:25 am

JDeLuca »

Van

The Uechi seniors have absolutely pushed this concept of a sporting base that will lead to a capable and competent martial artist.

GEM has put on Uechi ryu championships, and I have long read of the sport (and other) fighting legacys of the likes of Bethony, Rabesa, as well as yourself.

The young guns of Uechi like Gary K, Joe P, Bob S, Steve P and others continue this tradition.

These skilled practioners are able to deliver "Deadly Techniques" because the have built a fighting base due to sporting applications.

Jim Deluca
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:27 am

f.Channell »

Joe,

I love the "no rules on the street" argument.

My fights in tournaments have been 10 times harder than any of the street situations I have been in. I bet yours have been as well.

I began martial arts at 15 and got jumped by two guys in school 2 months later for the first time. I faired poorly and almost stopped training.

Since I have faired well in at least 6-12 situations.

Training for competition gets me in the weight room 4-5 days a week, as well as not missing classes. It gives you a drive that I just don't have otherwise.

How rules benefit training

Rules provide an environment where techniques have to be trained or adapted in a different way to be effective in a competition.

Rules make you adapt and be creative in your application.

Rules allow you to train to a higher level and more often because they in a small way prevent injury.

Rules always change and this good to keep you on your toes and finding new ways to win.


Fred

Sans Peur Ne Obliviscaris
www.hinghamkarate.com
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:37 am

Darren Laur »

"One Test Is Worth A Thousand Expert Opinions"

On another forum that I respect, a poster by the name of “gsudbrink” located the following quote from NASA:

“ One test is worth a thousand expert opinions”


This quote is an axiom that we in the self-protection field should aspire to time and time again. There are too many experts in the traditional and RBSD field who are spouting off “opinions” that when acid tested both empirically and scientifically hold no weight.

I truly believe that “credible” research, both empirical and scientific specific to human performance, needs to be applied to everything that is being taught as “realistic” self-protection.

We need to move from closed to open training environments where “opinion” and “theories” can be applied and tested under real conditions.

Experts hold great power over those they teach. The power of suggestion is extremely influential upon one’s performance and as such, an “expert’s” opinion can and will have a direct effect upon one’s ability, especially if the student believes the opinion to be true.

I fully understand and accept the fact that some of my beliefs may be shattered in the years to come based upon new research and science in the field of combatives as it relates to human performance.

As a “responsible” instructor, however, I accept this fact and as a result will adapt to the new research and science as it becomes available, but not before I empirically research it and acid test it as well.

Ego has no place in combatives, but yet ego is what blinds many experts in the area of combatives who will not change their ways, even if their ways are flawed based upon sound research and development of others.

“Do as I tell you to do because it works” type of instructors need to be challenged. In a finite context, I can usually make any technique work, especially in a closed environment where I can control context,

but context in a live fight is constantly changing due to the dynamics of a real street fight. It is in this spirit that I train for the “probable” not the “possible” (you can what if things to death) and as long as the principles of combat are sound (from both an empirical and scientific perspective) then they should be able to be applied in a constantly changing context thus allowing one to adapt, overcome, and improvise when Mr Murphy rears his ugly head.

This is where, IMO, that some traditional and RBSD instructors miss the boat !!!!

I myself base the core of my teachings on the combative based sciences rather than the combative sport based schools, as I believe that in real combat (read here, “where the real risk of death or serious injury” is a clear and present threat) the mind has been hard wired to react in a specific way for survival (based upon the research of Dr LeDoux).


Although I do believe that these reactions are hardwired, I also believe that they can be “molded” and used as a platform in a combative context. Having said this, I also utilize training techniques from the sport based combative schools to “enhance” the psychological performance of my students as well.

Phil Messina (Modern Warrior) coined the phrase; “your survival begins and ends with you”. When I trained with Phil in the early 1990’s, he taught me that an instructor can say and teach anything, but in the end you, and not your instructor, are the one rolling around in the mud, the blood, and the beer.


When the SH*T hits the fan opinions mean F**K all. Expert opinions vary, and it is because of this fact that the NASA axiom; “ One test is worth a thousand expert opinions” needs to be adopted by all.

In fact I would go one step further and say; “ multiple empirical and scientific testing on a combative principal is worth a thousand expert opinions.

” Don’t tell me, show me in a variety of differing contexts, which are repeatable, measurable, and useable by the majority rather than the minority (experts) should be our battle cry to those who wish to impart their opinion(s) onto us when it comes to RBSD, which in the end, could mean the difference between life or death.


" Research is to see what everyone else has seen, and think what no one else has thought”

Albert Szent-Gyorgy (Nobelish 1927)

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:44 am

Darren Laur »

"...... how do we get others to see that this works."


ANSWER:

As long as they wear their rose colored glasses, we can't.

Having said this, forums such as this open the door to those who are looking for realistic knowledge.

Slowly, through education and information, we can begin to tear down the walls of mysticism, traditionalism, and the pseudo-science claims that are rampant within the field of self-protection/ martial arts/ and RBSD systems.

As such, modern realists who question the who, what, where, how, and why, and think outside of the box based upon empirical research and true science as it relates to human performance in combatives, become targets, why ?????

because we are a financial threat to those who preach mysticism, traditionalism, and pseudo-science (including some who teach what they call RBSD).

In the end, it is my belief that the truth will prevail. The problem is however; one man’s truth or reality is another man’s fantasy.

Unfortunately, many will be seriously injured or killed in the process of applying their fantasy defences against fantasy attacks before the lesson is learned.

Darren Laur


PS: I believe the day is coming, if it hasn’t already happened, where those who teach these questionable techniques, as self-protection, will be held civilly liable in a “negligent training” suit when a student gets hurt.

Maybe AlanK has some insight on this thought process. I know this has become an issue in police use of force training, and I can clearly see a cross over to the civilian realm as well.

Darren Laur
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