Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:24 pm

It is 8:10 p.m. Roy takes his favorite .45, a stainless AMT Hardballer with 5" barrel and Pachmayr Signature grips, and slips it in his waistband "Mexican style" behind his right hip, tucking his dress shirt into the belt.

On his big frame, the cocked and locked .45 disappears under the shirt.

Then comes the shouted cry that makes his heart leap: "Give me the money!"

It comes from his right, only a few steps away on the other side of the free-standing wall that divides the managers' cubicles from the public area of the food store.

Aultman turns, instinctively ducking down, consciously taking an instant to compose himself. It's obvious that this isn't someone playing a joke.

"Give me all the money!"
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:25 pm

One young girl is frozen, like a rabbit in the presence of a snake. The enraged gunman smashes his heavy pistol across her face, then takes her by the throat, and lifts her bodily with one powerful arm. He throws her.

She flies through the air, completely clearing the five-foot dividing wall and landing in Aultman's office. She crashes to the floor near Aultman. Sobbing hysterically, she scrambles to her feet and runs out of sight.

As Aultman cautiously assesses the scene, he can see only one perpetrator. It's obviously a man, stockily built. Roy can't see his face, or even his color. The perpetrator is wearing a sweatshirt with hood pulled up, a mask and gloves.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:55 pm


Instead, Aultman's attention tunnels toward the weapon in the man's right hand. It's a silver-colored 1911 identical to his own. The man is standing to Roy's right and pointing the pistol at the two remaining female clerks on Roy's left.

The left side of the pistol is presented to him, and the storeowner can see clearly that the hammer is cocked, the safety is off and the finger is on the trigger.

Consciously trying to break out of the tunnel vision, Aultman scans left and right. He can see no other perpetrators, only the husky madman with his finger on the trigger.

Even with the facial features hidden by the mask, Roy can see the man is hyper, strung out, almost vibrating with violent tension.

He has thrown the 100-something pound girl over a five-foot wall with one hand, pausing only to pistol-whip her.

The pistol is swinging back and forth in a jerky, choppy motion between the other two young clerks. One of them is frozen, and the other is scooping money out of her cash drawer.

Saving the money isn't part of the equation. Aultman likes these young people who work for him, knows he's responsible for their safety and he is certain that in an instant this violent man with his finger on the trigger of a cocked pistol is going to shoot one or both of them.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 13, 2018 6:27 pm


Carefully, coolly, he takes the gun in both hands, his arms locked out in an isosceles stance, and braces the heel of his support hand on the top of the five-foot separation wall, bending at the waist to do so.

He knows something about human anatomy. He knows where he'll have to put the bullet to keep "death throes" from jerking the trigger of that other .45.

Aiming over the top of the gun, he aligns the muzzle and the front sight with the ear of the perpetrator.

At a moment when the suspect's gun is between the two victims and not actually pointed at either, Roy Aultman presses the trigger of his AMT straight back, with a smooth certainty born of years of practice.

The normally loud roar of the .45 seems soft and muted to Aultman as the pistol bucks in his hand. The man drops instantly, straight down, like a pile of laundry.

The cocked pistol is down too, and harmless now. Blood pours from the head of the motionless, crumpled man.

The 220 gr. semi-jacketed Speer bullet has caught the gunman just below the ear, coursing left to right through the lower part of the head where the primal reflexes emanate, and exited the other side.

The wound has caused instantaneous collapse with no "post-agonal" response. The attacker has collapsed without a twitch.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 13, 2018 6:36 pm


He has also been killed instantly. The terror has ended with a single, rescuing gunshot, delivered by an armed citizen from a distance of approximately 11 feet.
From the moment that the masked man had burst in the door wielding the big pistol, to the moment he fell dead, no more than 15 seconds have elapsed.

The shooting has gone down in a place of business containing many customers. One of the staff calls the police.

Unknown to Aultman, a car pulls up outside containing two men. They glance at the scene inside and then their vehicle pulls away.

Correlating the testimony of other witnesses, police will later conclude that these were the two accomplices who had let the gunman out of their car and were waiting for him in a laundromat parking lot across the street.

Aultman picked up the perpetrator's gun and locked it in his office. The police arrived quickly. Aultman's 1911 was still in his hand, pointing at the floor.

Recognizing him, the officers holstered their own weapons, and Roy then secured his.

The rest of the scene was Kafkaesque. [having a nightmarishly complex, bizarre, or illogical quality.]

Customers stood in line expecting to be waited on.

Those clerks who weren't too shaken dutifully ran their goods through checkout.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 13, 2018 6:41 pm

Not a minute and a half after the shooting, one customer walked up to the corpse and stared down at it for a moment, as the lake of blood continued to spread beneath it.

The man matter-of-factly said, "Deader'n hell, ain't he?" Then he casually walked from the store.

An officer pulled up the dead man's stocking mask. Beneath it was the face of an African-American man in his late 20s. A rime of white powder was still visible around his nostrils, not yet washed away by the blood.

Outside in the parking lot, some African-American people from the neighborhood clustered. There was muttering: "White man shot a black man in cold blood!"

But the mostly-black customers coming outside, who had witnessed the shooting, swiftly quelled the anger.

"We saw it. Nobody could tell what color that man was!"

"That SOB was pointing his gun at two black girls at the registers! The manager shot him to save their lives!"
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 13, 2018 6:50 pm


Race Card

The specter of a controversial "cross-racial shooting" faded away quickly, extinguished by the black community itself. African-Americans who lived in town were okay with Roy Aultman and his family.

They knew that at least half of the Super-Valu's staff is black, as is up to 70 percent of its customers. The Aultmans have always dealt with them with respect and friendship.

Besides, the black witnesses had been correct: no one could have known the gloved, masked man's race until after the shooting, and Aultman's bullet had rescued two young black women who were being terrorized by a violent individual who had already brutally assaulted one young woman.

There was no fertile soil for anyone with a personal agenda to plant a race-baiting press conference. That element of the incident simply disappeared.

The police and the district attorney's office saw a clear-cut case of justifiable homicide in defense of innocent persons, and ruled it as such without bothering to submit it to the county Grand Jury that met two months later.

Aultman's pistol, taken as evidence, was returned in due time. The dead man's gun, an AMT Hardballer identical to Aultman's, turned out to have been stolen in a burglary in a nearby community some weeks before.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 14, 2018 3:57 am


The robber, age 27 at time of death, had grown up in the area. He'd had a promising start as a high school athlete. But, police and reporters later discovered he had become involved in drugs.

The habit led him on a terrible odyssey of big cities and violent crimes, a journey that had ended at last with a single shot from an intended victim's pistol.

Workmen's Comp provided the SuperValu people with a psychologist to help them deal with the trauma. "She understood," Aultman told me softly. "The doctor had been the victim of an armed robbery herself. She was helpful."

No SuperValu employees quit after the incident. The three who were under the gun all personally thanked Aultman for saving their lives.

Business did not drop off. People in this part of Mississippi have a high level of common sense.

Two years before, just a few miles down the road in Pearl, a youth had murdered his mother, stolen a rifle from her bedroom, walked into the high school and started shooting people.

He had been stopped by another armed citizen, vice principal Joel Myrick.

Aultman's shooting was seen as a case of "good man kills bad man and saves good girls." The public saw it as good news for a change.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:00 am


Aultman would say later, "It wasn't an easy thing to do, but it had to be done. After what we had been through with my parents, it was easier to deal with than it might have been otherwise."

The two accomplices, though described by witnesses, were never captured. It is common practice for accomplices in a getaway car to have weapons which they will use to come to the aid of the more active perpetrator if he is caught in the act.

It is theorized that the two pulled up to the door, looked through the glass, saw a big man with a pistol standing over their dead partner, and decided to cut their losses and escape rather than risk their own lives.

Aultman says now, "I made one mistake. That getaway car at the laundromat across the street. I was looking around for other suspects, and my back was to them when they pulled up. I never knew they were there."
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:02 am

Roy experienced, to greater or lesser degrees, the three most common perceptual phenomena that occur in incidents like these: tunnel vision, auditory exclusion and the slow-motion sensation of tachypsychia.

"When I was crouched down on the other side of the wall," he remembers, "those few seconds seemed like an hour."

He consciously broke out of the tunnel vision that had allowed him to assess the threat of the cocked, off-safe gun in the wild offender's hand by deliberately turning his head to look for other perpetrators.

He missed the accomplices only because his back was turned.

He was aware that the single shot fired had a muffled sound, as he perceived it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:05 am


Regular shooting practice allowed the rescuer to make this tough shot under pressure.

He knew anatomy, and he knew how to index his weapon swiftly if there wasn't time for a precise conventional sight picture.

"I looked over the top of the slide like sighting a shotgun," he explained, adding that he could clearly see that his pistol was on target before he pressed the trigger.

A handloader, Roy normally carried his pistol with wide-mouth hollowpoint reloads. However, in a recent practice session, he had left in the firing chamber one of his practice rounds, built under the 220 gr. Speer half-jacketed bullet.

Despite its generous section of exposed lead, this projectile had only a tiny hollowpoint, and it had not expanded.

The slug had drilled through the gunman's head, travelling another 30 feet before it hit a steel refrigerator in the produce section.

The bullet had gone through one steel panel before lodging in a second. Fortunately, no bystanders had been in its path.


It is common for opposing lawyers in both criminal and civil cases to make "red herring" issues out of the use of handloaded ammunition for self-defense.

That did not occur in this case for the simple reason that there were no criminal charges brought, and at this writing, no civil lawsuit has been filed in the matter.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 14, 2018 6:17 pm

HE WAS LUCKY NOT TO BE IN PRISON NOW FOR

HALFORD E. JONES »

the shooting!

Most of today's do-gooders would like to see such persons as Roy Aultman,Jr. behind bars or,at the very least, disarmed! No matter how many stories like these make the papers, the general do-gooders and politically-corrects,etc. will keep oh harping(which is their right to do so, of course) about guns, self-defense,etc.

and continue to support the continual release of violent rapists, murderers, etc. into the general populace where they will rub elbows!

You see this everyday in the papers. Despite all the statistics that say otherwise, we have more to fear from people in this country than from any invader terrorists who plan more terrorism.

We know these guys deserve to die but when it comes to the locals, they are patted on the back and 're-habed'! :wink:

HALFORD E. JONES
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:42 am

Tactical first aid

From tony Blauer's forum:

I got caught up in a discussion the other day about something that I in hindsight find it strange that we are not addressing specifically in theoretical base as well as in drills.

“How to administer first aid without tactically compromising yourself?”

Peoples’ first inclination may be:” Why should I bother? He attacked me! I gave all warnings and if he can’t deal with what’s coming, he shouldn’t have attacked.”

Well, people get hurt in fights you weren’t involved in too. And hopefully, the chance is greater that you will observe a fight than participate in it.

And there may not be a discernible “good guy” and “bad guy.” And even the “good guy” would be in a less than resourceful state when he comes to. Indignation and adrenalin don’t go well together.

Not to mention that if you administer first aid to a person that has been struck down by another person, then the guy standing may interpret your actions as hostile or at least blaming or accusing.

Or even deciding that you are the problem. At least he knows in the back of his mind that there is a problem somewhere and his focus is on you. A very realistic drill, IMO.

Many people here are from public services like the Police Department. Administering first aid is part of the line of duty. The rest of us have the option of not getting involved if we get bad vibes, but what if it is, say, a friend of a friend that is laying there?

Will you bet that he will be able to tell friend from foe? Like for instance if you hit someone with your car, you will have minimal criteria to judge what kind of person he is.

And even if you have a basic idea from watching the fight, first aid takes you intimately close to strangers in a less-than-resourceful state.

And people around are excited... I don’t think the quality of service rendered necessarily will have to come at the expense of the tactical concerns. At least not for the purely life saving first aid.

But you need to know where and how to check for pulse and how to clear airways and should not have to spend a lot of time doing this and you can interpret your readings and yet keep focus around you.

And communicating intent to everyone. It would be useful even if you were the one who did the damage. Saves people a lot of pain in legal proceedings when probable intent is advocated/evaluated, how the jury will judge your character, whether you will lay and sweat the whole night through wondering if the cops are at the door next day as opposed to knowing that he did not lay and suffocate.

Ever since TB introduced the confrontational drill with NVP, self defense has been redefined to include identification of the deterministic nature of human behavior/response pattern and avoid or handle political in which the probability of someone else hurting you are heightened.

This is such a scenario. And the humanitarian nature of the situation may cause you to inadvertently disregard its tactical nature.

Or a more politically incorrect concern: that you can know when you are really in trouble, when it’s time to panic. Like people learning to handle firearms usually learn how to treat gunshot wounds.

Everyone is learning first aid these days, and if there is a tactical sound way of doing this, then I don’t see why one should do it any differently.

Chances are great that a laying and kicking panicky person with an arterial bleeding from the neck will respond aggressively to well willing efforts.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:44 am

Very interesting and important thread.
It illuminates our THREE FIGHTS principle:

FIght 1: You vs You (courage, fear management, self-coaching)

Fight 2: You vs the Opponent (skills, conditioning, Tactics, etc.)

Fight 3: You vs the Law. (Moral, ethical & legal considerations)


You can ace fight 1 & 2 and really blow fight 3. There are many countries that require one to administer some sort of treatment and there are likely subtle variations of this we should all at least get educated on.

Its a really edgy debate of course, aside from realistic concerns like: blood-borne pathogens, skill fear (EMS trained vs not), fear of making things worse through incorrect diagnosis...if you were involved in the conflict there's clearly going to be emotional factors pulling at you.

Interesting discussion.

If you have an opinion on this keep it succinct and professional. If you have a tactical/medical and legal insight, do share.


Tony
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:46 am

Timing your tactic

Coach Blauer also teaches that an attacker either wants your property, your person or your life. When they graduate from 1 to 2 and/or 3, THEN your "respond immediately" clause would kick in! (And it better be good!)

Seriously, determining the line between when to "go" or "not go" is not as difficult as it might seem, especially when you've worked through a variety of believable scenarios, adding what Coach calls "Live Action Response Drills". (An entire article on this topic appears in this month's Black Belt Mag.)

L.A.R.D.s help determine appropriateness in responding to violence. Combine this principle with your practice, some personal research and a good head on your shoulders and you'll do the right thing at the right time.
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