Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Apr 14, 2019 5:09 pm

THE ATTACK-

The attack phase can only come after the evaluation phase and the positioning phase. It is simply not possible to attack you until these first two stages have been completed.

The very best defense, therefore, is to circumvent the attack by not allowing the Evaluation Phase and the Positioning Phase to be fruitfully completed. Every single attack you avoid is a battle won!

In every attack you fail to prevent, you are at enormous risk! A one-eyed, three fingered jackass can miss you by ten feet with a handgun, and ricochet a round off the pavement and into your femoral artery.

Although you are “acidentally” dead, you’re still dead. Be alert and use your head and you won’t have to use your pistol nearly as often.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:30 pm

Givens
Sociopaths: These ANIMALS are born without or fail to develop (because of abuse) any sort of empathy for their fellow man. They not only feel nothing when inflicting pain, but IF it brings them sexual pleasure they may do so anytime or anywhere.

There will be no "cues." The serial killer may be a sociopath, but likely his other symptoms are not such as would inhibit him from interacting with "normal" folks socially... like in a daily work situation.

Some are so disconnected from reality they can't hold a job at any level. Society quickly detects these.

But folks like the infamous and now deceased serial killer Ted Bundy are winsome and charming and you may like hanging out with a guy like this, at first. But most folks will eventually get a clue that there is something... just WRONG.


It may be too late at that point, especially if you belong to the target group. But there will be no attack indicators with a sociopath.

What this means of course is that for folks you don't know very well be polite; be professional but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.

Be prepared to implement such plan instantly. If you run into a sociopath (highly unlikely unless you're a part of a target population) and he goes for you, you'll be behind the power curve from the start.

But react as if you'd been caught in a near ambush with an immediate action drill. EXTREME violence in instant response may well put this sort of wolf off balance and allow you to either escape or finish him.


Well, most of us will be just like fish in a barrel.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:33 pm

Yeah...but can you do it?

Givens
I was talking with some buddies of mine and said kind of the same thing. If I'm sitting in a restaurant I look around at the people sitting near and size them up.

"if the guy behind me that looks like a football player goes crazy, what will I do?" that kind of thing.

They thought I was nuts to have that kind of thought process at all. Nice to see that I'm not the only person the looks at everybody and says, "If I had to fight this person what would I do?"
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:44 pm

Police commands
Kuma-de »

Hi Van,

Basically, there are 2 statutes in Massachusetts that allow police to "command" others to assist them.

One is to come to their aid while attempting to subdue or arrest a person.

The second is to commandeer a vehicle to give chase. "In the name of the Commonwealth" was the term that we were supposed to say, but other words come to mind that work just as well.

Liability falls on the department should anything happen.

It is similar to a mutual aid pact where an officer gets hurt in another town. The city picks up the tab.

Jim Prouty
New England Budo Center
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:45 pm

Kuma-de »

Should you fail to assist when told you can be placed under arrest for "Failure to assist a police officer in the line of duty when commanded."

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:47 pm

Excerpted from Influence : The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert B. Cialdini.

One of the reasons reciprocation can be used so effectively as a device for gaining another's compliance is its power.


The rule possesses awesome strength, often producing a "yes" response to a request that, except for an existing feeling of indebtedness, would have surely been refused.


Some evidence of how the rule's force can overpower the influence of other factors that normally determine whether a request will be complied with can be seen in a second result of the Regan study.

Besides his interest in the impact of the reciprocate rule on compliance Regan was also interested in how liking for person affects the tendency to comply with that person's request.

To measure how liking toward how affected the subjects' decisions to buy his raffle tickets, Regan had them fill out several rating scales indicating how much they liked Joe.

He then compared their liking responses with the number of tickets they had purchased from Joe.

There was significant tendency for subjects to by more raffle tickets from Joe the more they liked him. But this alone is hardly a startling finding. Most of us would have guessed that people are more willing to do a favor for someone they like.


The interesting thing about the Regan experiment, however, is that the relationship between liking and compliance was completely wiped out in the condition under which subjects had been given a Coke by Joe.

For those who owed him a favor, it made no difference whether they liked him or not; they felt a sense of obligation to repay him, and they did.

The subjects in that condition who indicated that they disliked Joe bought just as many of his tickets as did those who indicated that they liked him.

The rule for reciprocity was so strong that it simply overwhelmed the influence of a factor - liking for the requester - that normally affects the decision to comply.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:53 pm

Kuma-de »

"Don't judge a man until you walk a mile in his moccasins!"

Everyone has an opinion, yet until you are in that life and death battle for your weapon, or just trying to subdue a crazy man like this guy, you have no idea what it's like.

It is not the same as what you practice in the dojo, on the MMA mat, etc.

I would yell to the cop that I'm going to help him. Even if he denies the help, I can see that he needs it. We'll argue about that later over a few beers!

Remember tunnel vision, he cannot think of the big picture because he cannot see the big picture. All he sees is the idiot low life he is struggling with.

As to training...yeah once or twice a year if cops get lucky they work on some defensive techniques.

It's not in the budget. Gotta build those new schools for the kiddies.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:37 am

Rory Miller

I say often that fighting is more mental than physical, especially survival fighting and ambush survival. There is a deep trap there and it needs to be addressed:

Someone will read those words and decide: "Therefore reading and thinking about fighting is just as good as, hell better than, physical training."

It is not, and that thought is the same thought that keeps people studying the same things over and over again, the thought that leads to the kool-aide drinking certainty that this (weapon, style, teacher, solution) is it.

It is all staying inside the comfort zone. I know there are armchair quarterbacks and lounge generals and things like that in other endeavors, but in martial arts, especially in it's relationship to violence, it seems that the majority act as if thinking were doing.

You don't get people who read art books believing they can forge a Rembrandt or that they could front for Aerosmith from watching MTV...

sometimes it feels like only in martial arts do you get people who believe that they have learned enough from watching Jackie Chan to defend themselves, have read enough books on ancient swordsmanship that they could kill.

Awareness, initiative and permission (the Big Three) are all mental aspects, not physical, yet knowing is not doing.

I can describe how senses can be overwhelmed and how things can become a blur until you can parrot the descriptions back to your students...

but you will have no idea what I mean until you feel it.

Of all the people who have read descriptions or even seen documentaries, not once have I seen a person recognize a rattlesnake's warning for the first time.

Almost all had an intense surge of adrenaline at the sound, but few knew why- and no one who has ever heard the sound in an unexpected place forgets it.

You can read and read about predator dynamics, but until you have been triangulated by threats, the difference between an ambush set up and three people walking in different directions is small, unnoticeable.

You can visualize precursors and fights, but until you have seen and felt and smelled one, the visualization is just fantasy, a day dream.

For your first ten for that matter, you won't remember them clearly. Your second hundred you will lose faith that they are predictable enough to visualize.

Initiative is a mental decision, but a physical action. Sitting in your comfortable chair in your climate-controlled room, your greatest danger some pixels on a screen it is very easy to decide what you will do if and when...

actually doing it is completely unrelated.

The only way to learn to act decisively is to practice acting decisively. Quickly, powerfully and without hesitation. It is a mental skill, and the things which interfere with it are mental problems, but the expression of it is purely physical.

Permission- you can try all you want, but you can't intellectualize your own glitches. What you think you can do (or can't) often has no bearing on your real limits when the time comes.

Your fantasy self rescues maidens in distress... in real life, when you hear a scream, do you run towards it, run away, or look around to see what others are doing?

These are limits you can only find by going into the dark places where they will be tested. If you don't like what you learn there, they can only be changed by returning and trying again.


The culminating moment from the seminar, for me:

After class, I ask each of the students the one thing they will remember.

One kid said, "Until I saw the video of the officer dying, I didn't believe it could happen to me. That I could freeze."

He always thought that knowing what to do automatically meant he would and could do it. Watching someone die who also, probably, believed this opened his eyes.

The ability to make decisions is not the same as the ability to execute decisions. One pair of eyes, ever so slightly, opened.


This is the kind of thinking that keeps a person alive, especially one who has had some training and developed illusions about what he is now capable of doing and ends up like a stick in the mud, against opponents and situations he never even dreamed of.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:51 am

Murders in Cheshire

MikeK »


More is being learned about the horrific home invasion in which a prominent doctor's wife and their two daughters were brutally killed.

Police say two career burglars, Steven Hayes and Joshua Komisarjevsky, stalked the family before the home invasion. They allegedly first targeted the family when they saw Jennifer Petit and her 11-year-old daughter Michaela on Sunday at the local supermarket and followed them home.

Police say once they had the Petit's address, they began preparing for the attack. They allegedly went to a Walmart to buy a rope and an air-powered rifle. Police say they staked out the Petit house until 3 a.m. Monday, and then entered through an unlocked door.

Dr. William Petit, a diabetes specialist, was attacked first, bound and savagely beaten with a baseball bat and dumped in the basement.

His two daughters, Hayley 17, and Michaela, 11, were tied to beds and allegedly sexually assaulted. After a nightmarish six-hour ordeal, one robber took Jennifer Petit to withdraw money from her neighborhood bank.

Ominously, on the way the robber stopped to buy a container of gas.

Police say they then came to a Bank of America branch to withdraw $15,000. Mrs. Petit was left alone with the bank teller, who expressed concern about such a large withdrawal. It was then that Mrs. Petit managed to let the teller know that her family was being held hostage. The moment she left, police were alerted.

But by the time police reached the Petit home, the gasoline was used to set the girls' bedrooms ablaze as they lay helpless. Michaela Petit was found dead from smoke inhalation, still tied to her bed, and Hayley Petit was found dead at the top of the stairs.

Jennifer Petit was strangled in a downstairs room. Dr. Petit struggled out of the basement through the flames despite his injuries.

Now there's growing outrage over the fact that Hayes and Komisarjevsky were freed on parole just weeks ago. Both men were living in a halfway house for non-violent offenders. Now they're accused of one of the most violent crimes imaginable

I was dreaming of the past...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:53 am

Road Kill

So what do we do in these situations more and more common these days?

It's hard to understand sometimes why you have suddenly been targeted by a driver with road rage.

You could have accidentally cut someone off because they tried to pass you in an outside lane, a blind spot. Usually this person is speeding up to get by you. In my case, it was someone rushing to get to an off-ramp to a Michigan interstate - the one I almost missed until my wife pointed it out.

I turned into the exit lane to hear screeching tires and a honking horn. I became distraught that an accident had almost occurred and began to slow down to see what was happening.

At this point, the offended driver sped up and began to tailgate me. His gestures and facial expressions gave me to know he was extremely angry. I had no recourse but to continue to the interstate so I wouldn't hold up traffic.

Once on the interstate, the man wildly drove around to get alongside me. He was gesturing and adamant that I pull over. My wife said "you better do what he says." But I would not. You hear enough stories about people getting shot at after these episodes. I wasn't about to put us in danger.

The first thing I did was mouth the words 'I'm sorry' with my best repentant expression. But this did not discourage him from continuing his gesticulations, angrily pointing to exit ramps that I passed. I tried apologizing one more time, hoping he'd give up but could see it was no use. So I nodded my head in agreement.

By this time we had gone about five miles. I had hoped this man had better things to do and would tire of our silent negotiations. When the next exit came, I had no intention of pulling over.

My speed was as high as the speed limit would allow on my approach. He was tailgating me as I expected. As I got onto the ramp, I knew I only had one chance to lose him. Now that I had his trust I would pull over, I pulled back onto the interstate at the very last moment. He didn't have time to react and had to continue his exit.

I knew he could cross over the road ahead to get to the next off-ramp to pursue again. I wasn't going to wait. I high-tailed it out of there and drove as fast as I could, but I got caught by a cop.

I never felt more relieved. Having informed the officer of our flight from the road rager, we were free to go. We were traveling out of state at the time and glad that things worked out the way they did.

I've had similar incidents involving hot-headed types that would sidle alongside and gesture. I do not make eye contact. I slow to let them pass. Some like to tailgate anyway.

But I find the longer you drive, the more tired they become of the chase. But I will never get out of my car for anyone. No one should. And if you can call police when you feel you are being threatened, don't hesitate to dial 911.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:58 am

f.Channell »

We recently had a case in town where a guy tailgated someone in a road rage fit and the fellow called the Police.

An officer was right down the street and pulled over the rager. Upon approaching the car he noticed them stuffing something under the seat.

Well the driver was on a suspended license and they were stuffing heroin under the seat.

That guys rage cost him and his passengers big time.

Of course too many officers are on "get ticket money duty" and aren't driving around looking for these kind of people. Too bad.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:03 am

A growing menace

Then early Sunday morning, a burly man with a crew cut used a flashing blue light on his car to stop a driver on Route 24 in Randolph. Police say the man, who wore a blue shirt emblazoned with a shield, ordered the woman out of her vehicle, then sexually assaulted her .

Authorities say the crimes emerged from a dangerous subculture of police impersonators.

State Police advise motorists unsure whether a real officer in an unmarked vehicle is trying to pull them over to turn on their hazard lights and drive slowly to a well- lighted area where other people are present before stopping.

Motorists will not be charged with resisting arrest.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:10 am

The real truth of the matter

Any Man ....

"Any man who is a man may not, in honor, submit to
threats of violence. But many men who are not cowards
are simply unprepared for acts of human savagery.

They
have not thought about it (incredible as this may
appear to anyone who reads the papers or listens to
the news)and they just don't know what to do.

When
they look right into the face of depravity and
violence they are astonished and confounded"


-Jeff Cooper

~~~

Rory Miller has written the same...

It really confounds the arm chair warriors with Sanchin being their God of hope....but nothing else.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 19, 2019 4:32 pm

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Apr 19, 2019 11:13 pm

The Practical Implication—This Can Get You Killed

"Sorting Out the Situation." All of this leads to the problem inherent in any display of a handgun by a civilian in a public place: the difficulty law enforcement officers may have in deciding who is the good guy and who is the bad guy.

Any time a civilian uses deadly force—or even displays a firearm—responding police officers will be on edge.

Let's say you are holding a would-be attacker at gun point when police arrive. What do they see? Two citizens—both unknown to them—one of whom is armed. Promptly obey any orders they give, and then identify yourself.

Do whatever they ask, and let them sort out the situation.

This advice to obey police orders may seem self-evident on its face. But the problems of tunnel vision, auditory exclusion, and general degradation of one's mental faculties make it problematic whether the civilian handgun owner will see, hear, or have the presence of mind to obey such orders.

And suppose they are given by an officer or detective in plain clothes?

This problem is underscored by the unfortunate incidents of police shooting other police when they encounter each other in plain clothes or in off-duty situations.

One of the more spectacular of these happened in the New York City subway after a youth dropped a shotgun and it went off in a train car. An off-duty police officer stepped into the car, identified himself, and picked up the gun.


Within seconds, an undercover transit officer wearing plain clothes also arrived at the scene and had drawn his gun. The first officer shot the second, seriously wounding him and ending both officers' careers.

A similar incident occurred in Rhode Island when an off-duty police officer in civilian clothes saw a man with a gun confronting two police officers. The off-duty officer was fatally shot by the officers when he rushed to help them.

A dispatcher's mix-up in Austin, Texas, resulted in a police officer's shooting of an off-duty sheriff's deputy.
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