Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:47 am

Helping the Police?

The latter of these cases illustrates the high probability that a "virtuous" attempt by an armed civilian to "help" a police officer can go terribly wrong. Ayoob explains:

The legal protection offered to the man who is assisting an officer goes into effect only when the officer asks you to assist him.

The man who is just driving by, witnesses a pursuit, and joins in, will not be considered a volunteer police officer....

And never forget that support officers racing in to assist may mistake you for the bad guy and blow you up. "Oops," as we say in the trade.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:48 am

Remembering the Drill. Given all of these effects of mortal fear, it is likely that the untrained handgun owner will find it difficult, if not impossible, to recall much less act upon theoretically good advice that he may have gained from "book learning" about using his handgun.

For example, Bill Clede advises the pistol owner to "never move sideways by crossing one leg over the other. You don't want to stumble or trip with a loaded gun in your hand, so if you must move, sidle."203

Will that gem pop into the mind of the person who is trembling, losing control of his bowels, experiencing tunnel vision, and loss of rational thinking ability?

Probably not, which is why law enforcement trainers teach their officers to learn, drill repeatedly, and rely on thoroughly learned practical and virtually automatic responses when in lethal force situations. Firearms instructor Jim Cirillo writes:

In all of my firearms courses, I strive to bring forth that subconscious reaction that I know students may need if they are confronted suddenly with the moment of truth....[an] ability that would be difficult to achieve with the conscious mind alone.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:49 am

Getting Shot Back.

A final word is necessary about the potential for the defender to get shot himself in the course of the encounter. Does he know how to react to that event?

Experts point out that survival may well depend not only on knowing how to control shock, but also on not exposing oneself to further injury or death. Here is a lesson one expert draws from paint-ball exercises:

The paintballs, of course, are not lethal, but they do sting. In this case, one trainee was playing the role of an officer who had the suspect covered.

The "officer" was shielded by the corner of a building, but one of his legs was sticking out. The "suspect's" partner was able to hit the officer's thigh with a paintball.

Reacting to the sting, the trainee reached over to grasp his leg—and was hit twice on his face shield. In real life, he would have been killed. So the rule is, if you are hurt in a confrontation, address the threat first. Your injury can wait.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 20, 2019 3:36 pm

Body language

f.Channell »

Body language can be useful in many different areas of life. For example if you were selling a car you can look for body language that the person is interested and ready to purchase, and close the deal.

Body language is also useful in determining when and if a person is a threat or ready to attack.

You can then make your decision on attacking first, or taking defensive steps or action.

Some examples of aggressive body language.
Some are ones your familiar with, others may vary by culture or country.

Threat
Facial signals
Much aggression can be shown in the face, from disapproving frowns and pursed lips to sneers and full snarls. The eyes can be used to stare and hold the gaze for long period. They may also squint, preventing the other person seeing where you are looking.

Attack signals
When somebody is about to attack, they give visual signal such as clenching of fists ready to strike and lowering and spreading of the body for stability. They are also likely to give anger signs such as redness of the face.

Exposing oneself
Exposing oneself to attack is also a form of aggression. It is saying 'Go on - I dare you. I will still win.' It can include not looking at the other person, crotch displays, relaxing the body, turning away and so on.

Invasion
Invading the space of the other person in some way is an act of aggression that is equivalent to one country invading another.

False friendship
Invasion is often done under the cloak of
familiarity, where you act as if you are being friendly and move into a space reserved for friends, but without being invited.
This gives the other person a dilemma of whether to repel a 'friendly' advance or to accept dominance of the other.

Approach
When you go inside the comfort zone of others without permission, you are effectively invading their territory. The close you get, the greater your ability to have 'first strike', from which an opponent may not recover.

Touching
Touching the person is another form of invasion. Even touching social touch zones such as arm and back can be aggressive.

Gestures
Insulting gestures
There are many, many gestures that have the primary intent of insulting the other person and hence inciting them to anger and a perhaps unwise battle.

Single and double fingers pointed up, arm thrusts, chin tilts and so on are used, although many of these do vary across cultures (which can make for hazardous accidental movements when you are overseas).

Many gestures are sexual in nature, indicating that the other person should go away and fornicate, that you (or someone else) are having sex with their partner, and so on.

Mock attacks
Gestures may include symbolic action that mimics actual attacks, including waving fingers (the beating baton), shaking fists, head-butts and so on. This is saying 'Here is what I will do to you!'

Physical items may be used as substitutes, for example banging of tables and doors or throwing . Again, this is saying 'This could be you!'

Sudden movements
All of these gestures may be done suddenly, signaling your level of aggression and testing the other person's reactions.

Large gestures
The size of gestures may also be used to signal levels of aggression, from simple finger movements to whole arm sweeps, sometimes even with exaggerated movements of the entire body.

F.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:14 pm

dejsis »

Have you ever seen how fast animals can gauge wether you have good or bad intentions? If a cat crosses your path they always stop to look at you. If you so much as have bad thoughts towards them they are out of there in a flash. Somewhere along the way we lost this ability. Or maybe we never lost it, we just forgot how to recognize it?

We did an exercise once. You send one guy out of the room. Then you stand in a circle holding hands and you agree that all of you will be thinking negative thoughts towards the guy except for two of you. You are not allowed to talk or use any bodily signals. Then you invite the guy back in to stand in the middle of the circle and you tell him he can only leave the circle through two people. It never fails.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:34 pm

Fundamentals

After all the kind of training you do and all the seminars you take, and feeling good about what you have learned or think you have learned in the way of advanced knowledge...the moment suddenly comes out of nowhere with one or two assailants bigger and stronger than you and with bad intent 'cut you out of the pack' and want to stomp your face into the ground.

You suddenly realize...No such things as advanced techniques in a survival situation… just ‘engagements’ in which
The fundamentals were performed really well.

Your intelligent practice is one where you practice those things that are likely to happen based on past situations you have experienced or learned of. If you don't practice this stuff in the dojo, thinking it will all come out magically from floor dancing...you are going to get smashed to bits by a couple of punks.

The necessary skill we need to learn in our quest to stay safe through the practice of a martial art, as an example, is to be able to think fast and sort out what is about to unfold in front of you, as well as to sense what is about to go down at a subconscious level...and feel comfortable with at least some defensive moves against most common attacks...and moves that hurt the assailant more than hurt you.

The brain does not know the difference between a real confrontation and the one that is simulated even in the mind.

Then as you anticipate injury you keep programming the fundamentals through the ‘fog’ _ Read 'Strong on defense' by Lt Sanford Strong.

Speed equals economy of motion with no wasted effort_

As you train be deliberate with your moves _one _at _a _time _ as in _ the next move you are about to do, allowed to do in the chaos, is the most important of your life.

You don't want be shooing flies.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Apr 23, 2019 5:52 am

And then you realize, as I have been posting on this page before with real life examples...that the very training we do in the name of self defense or some other hack·neyed reason you are able to spout on the moment...
Let me start out by saying: Most martial arts/self-defense training will get you thrown in jail, sued or both.
McYoung

Why...we ask...
That is because, while self-defense is legal, fighting is not. Most martial arts instruction is oriented towards one-on-one fighting or "dueling."
As such, it is predicated on the assumption that you are a willing participant.

Now you can rationalize around it saying "That isn't what we train for," but until you understand what the legal differences are between self-defense and fighting (and how the police, law and society look at the subject) you are putting yourself in serious danger -- both physically and legally.


We highly recommend you take a side trip to the

http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/se ... lained.htm

Explained page before you read any further. It's a layman's explanation about how easy it is to cross from defending yourself into attacking or fighting.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Apr 23, 2019 5:58 am

Perhaps the most important thing for you to realize is that when it comes to the self-defense plea, that pool has been seriously pissed in. And it has been
polluted for a long, long time. Even if the guy really did just walk up and, without any provocation or forewarning, knock you off the bar stool, when the cops show up there is at least a 75 percent chance of his claiming it was "self-defense." If there was a confrontation where words were exchanged prior to blows, the odds go up to about 97 percent.

How's that going to make your claim it was "self-defense" sound?

The reality of the situation doesn't matter, that is what he is going to tell the cops. He's going to lie to try to avoid going to jail. This is about as unpredictable as the sunrise. In otherwords, it will happen. Recognize that the police have just shown up on the scene.

They have no idea who is telling the truth. But what they do know is that both parties are telling them the same thing -- except who was to blame. On that one they are accusing each other.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Apr 23, 2019 6:02 am

Most officers tend to assume (and often rightly so) that both parties are guilty. Depending how severe the altercation is, they will act accordingly and arrest you both. If you are in a smaller jurisdiction, arrest is almost guaranteed if it went physical.

In larger metropolitan areas or on busy nights, you *might* get away without being arrested -- if you blatantly lost the fight or can present a calm and reasonable justification for your actions. But I wouldn't rely on that.

In a nutshell, the police have seen 999 times where both parties were guilty of stupid, obnoxious and illegal behavior (which is the difference between fighting and self-defense), so don't be surprised if they don't look at you as that one exception in a thousand. And this is especially true if you weren't the exception.
McYoung

And if any kind of weapon gets used, even a legal weapon, you can guarantee being arrested especially if you were filmed by some camera nearby, which you probably did.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri May 24, 2019 2:58 pm

Lessons for the real world.

This applies to all...armed on unarmed as one might choose, or if you practice a martial art you think has all the bases covered:

Gabe Suarez

IS CAPACITY IMPORTANT IN A PISTOL??

If you believe the stats, then simply carry a J-Frame snubby with five shots, no reload, and never mind with any of the rest...because statistically it don't matter. Whistling through the woods telling yourself, "there are no wolves, there are no wolves", will not change their minds about how tasty you might be.

Statistically they may never choose a human over a rabbit. Remember, you have your five.

Consider that you can probably shoot a full-sized Glock 17 far better and faster and with greater accuracy than you can a snubby with five shots. (Don't bore me with what McGivern could do, tell me about what you can do right now.)...and then show me live on a force on force drill.

Consider that a hand-filling gun automatically holds more than 5 shots. In fact, the Glock 23 that I shoot better than I shoot my snubby automatically comes with 8 more shots than I will need...statistically speaking. Of course, you can always block out your magazines to hold only five if you wish.

Consider that people miss in gunfights because a gunfight is more typified by the force on force drill we do and not by the shooting drills done at marksmanship-based schools.

A gun guru who says he's never missed in a gunfight has not been in many reactive gunfights. Hell, even Jelly Bryce missed with two out of six in a reactive fight. Having extra ammo will help you catch up if you do miss.

Consider that the same statistics tell that multiple adversaries [sic] are the rule and not the exception.

Consider that if its possible to miss when reacting to one, it is three times as likely when reacting to three.

Go up against three uncooperative adversaries in a force on force drills (as opposed to a masturbatory el presidente on the safe and sane shooting range) with only five shots in your airsoft and then tell me again about statistics.

Consider that the Islamic Terrorist in SLC WAS NOT STOPPED by a man with seven shots. He chose not to attack the 1911 armed guy because the islamic terrorist was in fact a coward.

Apples and oranges? Just as many cowards are thwarted without the good guy firing a shot. Are we to carry replicas with which to threaten only, because of this?

When I worked in the PRK, I carried no less than three pistols, and close to 75 rounds on my person. I had another bag of five 15 round magazines in the car and a shotgun or Colt Commando.

Ammo is cheap, life is costly so I planned to be generous with my ammo.
I wrote an article for CCW mag a few months ago titled something like - How Important is Capacity?

My idea is that capacity is a definite asset. First thing of course is shootability. I have students with very small hands. What do I suggest to them? Get a Kahr or Kel-Tec because they will fit.

Their fingers would not even reach the trigger on a Glock 19. However, just as it is better to be big and strong instead of small and strong, you must understand the limits you face.

I have nothing against 1911s...or SIG P-220s for that matter, but they are not for me. Personally I prefer a few more shots.

I know enough about gunfights to tell you that unless you are being totally proactive and preemptive, you may easily miss. Human adversaries will not stand there and smile at you, posed for the "Grip" like the B-27 target, while you fire a "tight group".

Come to any force on force class and see if you can hit with everything you shoot? Heck, even Jelly Bryce missed with a couple out of his pistol when he shot the robber in the whorehouse as he, "jumped to the side and then tore him up (shot him to the ground on the move)".

Another issue is the myth of "they all fall to hardball". Sorry, no they don't. They don't even fall to shotgun slugs all the time, let alone a puny pistol bullet. The only single shot stop I ever saw was a heart shot from a Sig P-226. It was a Win 115gr JHP 9mm.

Motivated human adversaries (as opposed to Pepper Poppers on the range) will keep fighting with horrible physical damage. So please do not overestimate or underestimate a pistol round. They are all fairly similar.


A higher capacity will allow you to stay in the fight longer and dominate the fight more decisively. Knowing that you will need more than a single or a pair per man (simply due perhaps to delayed reactions), and that the stats themselves say there will probably be more than one bad guy, and that the dynamics of the fight may create a situation where you simply may not be able to hit with every shot, as high a capacity as you can handle is the best option.


Another issue is shootability under stress. You should be able to shoot the pistol with any grip, under any circumstances, in any position.

To say that you will always be able to get a perfect "combat grip" is optimistic at best. Again, please come to a FOF class and try it out. On the range from open carry it is easy.

When you are being shot at and you are sprinting to get off the x and trying to draw under the polo shirt concealment, that combat grip often turns into a Fed Flintstone grip. Will you pistol work with a Fred Flintstone grip?

I carry a Glock 22 or 23 because it suits me, and because it will work under the conditions of combat I choose to prepare for. Is it a worst case? Yes it is. I've found through the years that this policy is far better than playing the odds and then being caught short at the moment of truth.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri May 24, 2019 3:12 pm

Suarez
Another issue is the myth of "they all fall to hardball". Sorry, no they don't. They don't even fall to shotgun slugs all the time, let alone a puny pistol bullet. The only single shot stop I ever saw was a heart shot from a Sig P-226. It was a Win 115gr JHP 9mm.

Motivated human adversaries (as opposed to Pepper Poppers on the range) will keep fighting with horrible physical damage. So please do not overestimate or underestimate a pistol round. They are all fairly similar.


This goes directly to martial artists' dreams of stopping power they believe they have from their style, their practice, their physical prowess, their confidence.

The truth is that 'your best shot' provides you no guarantees of stopping anyone, especially if up against opponents built like refrigerators with great mass and momentum.

Whenever you raise your hands to engage anyone...especially with someone who is much bigger and stronger...any technique you felt was so great...may fail to stop and possibly further enrage the opponent who now wants to really make you pay big time.

....Motivated human adversaries will keep fighting with horrible physical damage.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri May 24, 2019 3:27 pm

The footwork of Pekiti -Tirsia

FOOTWORK... top
The first thing (and from six through nine years of age, the only thing) Tuhon Gaje learned was footwork . There are 12 categories of footwork in Pekiti-Tirsia.

1. Sidestepping (90* and 180* turns)

2. Ducking (squatting, springing, kneeling and low work in general)

3. Forward Triangle (offensive footwork-the triangle's apex points toward opponent)

4. Reverse Triangle (counter-offensive footwork-the triangle's base points toward
opponent)

5. Wave-in/wave-out (long range baits, fakes, and retreats)

6. Take-offs ( a running attack that changes direction one or more times)

7. Ranging (a 45*, 90*, and 135*stepping, leaping or spinning attack)

8. "L" Pattern (90 turns)

9. "M" Pattern (two forward triangles side by side)

10. "N" Pattern (forward triangle with long sidestep)

11. "W" Pattern (two reverse triangles side by side)

12. "Star" Pattern (superimposed forward and reverse triangles in which the apexes change positions); plus variations such as Diamond, Hourglass and Box.


If I remember correctly, we worked the Forward Triangle (offensive footwork-the triangle's apex points toward opponent)

Reverse Triangle (counter-offensive footwork-the triangle's base points toward
opponent)

Take-offs_

And Star" Pattern (superimposed forward and reverse triangles in which the apexes change positions); plus variations such as Diamond, Hourglass and Box.


Footwork drills along with constant impact training in every class...really the best way to train applications from the style we practice. If you cannot move and cannot hit solidly...you will be at great risk in a defensive situation.

At least 50 % of class time should be devoted to footwork drill to evade common attacks and to impact training.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri May 24, 2019 3:31 pm

some random stuff

"Guys who do home invasions, their whole thing is not the stealing,” says Portenier. “It’s about terrorizing the family. It’s about violence, homicide and rape. It’s beyond burglary. So, home invasions have the tendency to be more violent than other crimes in the home."

. CBS47 investigated 26 recent home invasions in Duval County.
- 3 times thugs got in through unlocked doors
- 4 times, they rushed the front door and attacked as victims were trying to leave or get into their homes
- 5 victims answered a knock at the door without looking through the peephole first to see who was out there
- 3 times thugs slipped in while the victim was sleeping
- 1 time, the criminals kicked in the front door
It can be the most frightening thing to ever happen, as Dumstorf knows. And it can happen to you, too.

For one, having your home invaded seems like a pretty rare event unless you live in the inner city of a major city... it could probably be equated to getting struck by lightning for most.

But I think it's common sense stuff though: keep your house locked, always check to see who's at the door and be up on your disarming techniques (which also means knowing how to fire a gun well). The argument here for me is that the closest defensive weapon to use is the attacker's.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 04, 2019 5:02 am

Mike
How did they simulate mentally moving from nice, warm and safe to registering the threat and having to act? A lot of good stuff in the article but doesn't address that crucial first second or two of the encounter.


This is a very good point to remember when you suddenly realize you are involved in a confrontation. The fact you are in one and that you need to act in some way, will take you by surprise many times...and will cause those crucial 'hesitation' states that Mike points out.

Suarez writes
Develop and Attitude
Attitude encompasses alertness, willingness to act, and the ability to read a situation.


Even so it is just about impossible to be readily aware 100% of the time. An attacker has already made up his mind to attack you...and you will lag behind.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 04, 2019 5:08 am

f.Channell »

Body language

Body language can be useful in many different areas of life. For example if you were selling a car you can look for body language that the person is interested and ready to purchase, and close the deal.

Body language is also useful in determining when and if a person is a threat or ready to attack.

You can then make your decision on attacking first, or taking defensive steps or action.

Some examples of aggressive body language.
Some are ones your familiar with, others may vary by culture or country.

Threat
Facial signals

Much aggression can be shown in the face, from disapproving frowns and pursed lips to sneers and full snarls. The eyes can be used to stare and hold the gaze for long period. They may also squint, preventing the other person seeing where you are looking.

Attack signals

When somebody is about to attack, they give visual signal such as clenching of fists ready to strike and lowering and spreading of the body for stability. They are also likely to give anger signs such as redness of the face.

Exposing oneself

Exposing oneself to attack is also a form of aggression. It is saying 'Go on - I dare you. I will still win.' It can include not looking at the other person, crotch displays, relaxing the body, turning away and so on.

Invasion

Invading the space of the other person in some way is an act of aggression that is equivalent to one country invading another.

False friendship

Invasion is often done under the cloak of familiarity, where you act as if you are being friendly and move into a space reserved for friends, but without being invited. This gives the other person a dilemma of whether to repel a 'friendly' advance or to accept dominance of the other.

Approach

When you go inside the comfort zone of others without permission, you are effectively invading their territory. The close you get, the greater your ability to have 'first strike', from which an opponent may not recover.

Touching

Touching the person is another form of invasion. Even touching social touch zones such as arm and back can be aggressive.

Gestures

Insulting gestures
There are many, many gestures that have the primary intent of insulting the other person and hence inciting them to anger and a perhaps unwise battle.

Single and double fingers pointed up, arm thrusts, chin tilts and so on are used, although many of these do vary across cultures (which can make for hazardous accidental movements when you are overseas).

Many gestures are sexual in nature, indicating that the other person should go away and fornicate, that you (or someone else) are having sex with their partner, and so on.

Mock attacks

Gestures may include symbolic action that mimics actual attacks, including waving fingers (the beating baton), shaking fists, head-butts and so on. This is saying 'Here is what I will do to you!'

Physical items may be used as substitutes, for example banging of tables and doors or throwing . Again, this is saying 'This could be you!'

Sudden movements

All of these gestures may be done suddenly, signaling your level of aggression and testing the other person's reactions.

Large gestures

The size of gestures may also be used to signal levels of aggression, from simple finger movements to whole arm sweeps, sometimes even with exaggerated movements of the entire body.

F.
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