Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:29 pm

CONTROL

It is possible to reduce the effects of the chemical imbalance on our bodies in a conflict, but we can never remove them.

Training or working in conditions that induce this chemical response will tend to desensitise us, we become less “bothered” about the threat, and thus we can maintain an element of control.

As has been stated, experienced fighters know a quieter individual can be a greater threat; positioning the body into a natural fighting stance can augment this.

From this position they know that you probably know how to fight, as it is the most stable to launch a strike from.

Another way to get some one to capitulate is to cause what is known as an “adrenal dump”.

By behaving in a manner that causes the onlooker’s brain to flush the body with adrenaline, you can create the feeling of fear, which in turn causes them to capitulate.

This can be done by sudden and extreme aggression. A way to enhance this is to push the opponent out of fighting range, it is thought that the creation of distance causes the body to go from “fight” to “flight” as they have suddenly been given a way out.

Certainly when trying to intervene in a fight a very loud and aggressive “OI!!” has been known to stop a fight, this is certainly the case for some prisoners who end up fighting in order to “keep face”, but desperately want someone else to end the fight for them.

It is important to remember, however, that this increase in aggression can refocus the opponent towards you and trigger an attack; after all they are already geared for action and just require the appropriate trigger.

Issuing calming or passive body language can placate an aggressive opponent.

Keeping a relaxed body with little movement, emphasised with a relaxed face and voice can help keep your attacker in the deciding phase as they still can’t decide if you’re a threat or not, but as with responding with aggression, this may also trigger an attack as the individual may decide you no longer pose a threat to themselves as you are passive.


It is my hope that, just as I did, by gaining an understanding of these mechanics of conflict will not only help you to recognise your own responses, thus gain an element of control over them, but you will recognise them and the pre-fight rituals that accompany them in others, thus (hopefully) negating physical conflict at an earlier opportunity.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:33 pm

Communication

Darren Laur »

Hard, Soft, Neutral, Covert
The 5 Golden Rules to Verbal Communication

Ahhhhh the gentle art of verbal communication/persuasion. When engaging a threat in Verbal persuasion, context and situation is going to dictate my verbal communication strategy be it:

Hard: (Back off !!!, don’t come any closer !!!, stop right there !!!) Verbal Demand

Soft: (I’m feeling a little uncomfortable with you being so close) Verbal feedback

Neutral: (Can you just step back a little bit? Why do you have to come so close?) Verbal Question

Covert: (see if you can’t just step back a little bit) Verbal question combined with a subconscious challenge


Whatever the communication strategy chosen, one MUST also be congruent with body language exhibited by you as the user. Remember if the voice and body don’t match, the threat will usually believe the body.


Hard communication can often evoke a negative challenge by one who is psychologically intent on causing you harm.

Often phrases such as back off, don’t come any closer, or stop right their, especially as a primary verbal response, can often “precipitate” a physical altercation to take place, an undesirable outcome in my opinion.

Having said this, as a police officer (an often situational and context specific job) I will use these phrases as a last chance, save face, opportunity that a subject can comply with before physical force is used to control resistant or assaultive behaviour.

For most (non-law enforcement, non-military, non-security) here at the school, I teach students to use neutral linguistics patterns that can synergize into soft linguistics patterns and when needed, interject a covert linguistic pattern with hard patterns often being a last resort.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:36 pm

Darren Laur>>

Eg:

During a “street interview” when a subject is probing your proximal zones I might say (from a good passive stance)_ “ Wow, I don’t know about you, but I am feeling a little uncomfortable, can you just step back a little, or if you want I can just step back” (neutral combined with soft).

If I get non-compliance I may move to, “ Hey brother, see if you can’t just step back a little bit for me” (covert). If I still get non-compliance I may now move to. “ I need you to back off” (Hard).

It has been my experience that starting with a hard linguistic pattern only causes the person; especially if it is someone you do not know, to escalate his or her intentions.

This is especially true if the subject has friends, as they will want to save face. In other words these hard phrases, when used in street encounters, often don’t de-escalate a situation, BUT often escalate one to a physical encounter.


When verbally interacting with a threat, remember that your communication should not in most circumstances:

1. Challenge in a negative way

2. Command your threat to do something

3. Threaten

4. Insinuate that your threat is wrong

5. Prevent the threat from saving face

These are what I call the “5 Golden Rules of Verbal Communication” when attempting to de-escalate a potential aggressor.

As always, a physical interdiction can take place at any time no matter what communication strategy used, if you believe the threat is about to physically attack.

Often, these communication strategies can cognitively “pattern interrupt” the threat, when used appropriately, giving you a tactical advantage when initiating a physical first strike.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:40 pm

Usually victims of attack experience anger and fear in response to both individual (e.g., a perpetrator’s menacing glare) and environmental cues.
[where you might be at the time]

Additionally, spotting subtle changes in charged emotions [his/yours] _ can be difficult at times making it hard to identify intent.

In using any verbal diffusion in impending confrontations you must have a self awareness of physiological symptoms [e.g., a queasy stomach, shaky voice, etc.] that might make things much worse than if you had just kept your mouth shut to begin with.

~~~

And in this country, when you think of a possible enemy. Think again_

There is such thing as ‘Culturally induced Psychoses in some people who might well be the opponent[s] you are about to face.

Something that has been identified by clinical psychologists is the Nationality self-concept.

The condition, In acute cases, can results in a form of temporary insanity, which renders some individuals more susceptible than others, if brought up with a highly masculinized sense of National self identity _ that makes them particularly sensitive to defeat or loss of face.

The condition takes a bipolar form because many such people while they may appear, at Times, to be arrogant _ this masks a deep seated underlying insecurity with associated feelings of paranoia.

The problem appears to be linked to the obsession with power and glory.

In the highly charged atmosphere of impending confrontations there is increased activity in the amygdala and Medulla oblongata and significant changes in
Levels of serotonin.

These are associated with Vestigial aversive (paranoid) aggression.

When faced with this situation, often ‘well cloaked’ subliminal signals sent by ‘distorted’ verbal communication may become crucial triggers.

Darren may have some thoughts on this.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:43 pm

Darren Laur »

Darren, can you give some examples of this word by word?



I will do ya one better, here's a link to an article that I wrote on saving face:


http://www.personalprotectionsystems.ca ... inions.doc

When faced with this situation, often ‘well cloaked’ subliminal signals sent by ‘distorted’ verbal communication may become crucial triggers.



This is why CONGRUENCY is so important. This must be trained, and built into Neural Based Scenario Training

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:50 pm

Kuma-de »

Every one of us has experienced a phenomenon commonly known as body alarm response. You probably think of this as your "fight or flight" response. This is your normal reaction to a perceived threat, that moment when your situational awareness begins to shift into hyper-drive, and you start to go into survival mode.

We've all been there. Body alarm response manifests itself in many ways, differently for each of us, and often differently based upon the situation. Common reactions are tension, sweating, shallow rapid breathing, quickened pulse, perceptual narrowing, a feeling of anxiety, and the list goes on. There are many physiological and psychological elements to this normal, natural reaction to danger.

Most of us have learned to manage this effect to some degree, some more successfully than others. Every officer knows someone that is remarkably cool under pressure, and someone that just can't seem to hold themselves together. Generally we admire the former, and pity the latter. The fact is that we all have elements of each type--some of us just react differently.

Pursuit Fixation

When body alarm response kicks in during a vehicle pursuit, we fall into a condition known as "pursuit fixation." We suffer all the typical responses to body alarm stress, within the context of an intense, focused mission. We are after the fleeing bad guy and our mission in life becomes his apprehension. We are focused on our goal--to catch him!

There are a couple of common by-products of this situation. First, it's not uncommon for officers in these circumstances to get angry. There are lots of theories as to why this happens, and my friends in the police psychology field probably have medical terminology for classifying it, but ,in the most simple terms, I think a lot of officers just get p***ed off that the guy is running.

Whether the officer sees it as a challenge to authority, or is unhappy at having to put himself or herself at risk by driving fast, or maybe just doesn't want to get their freshly washed cruiser muddy, they get angry. Anger colors judgment, and in a police pursuit, we cannot afford to have our judgment impaired by any extraneous emotion.

The second by-product is single-mindedness. That, in and of itself, is not necessarily bad. The problem occurs when that single-mindedness is focused solely on apprehension of the violator.

When this occurs, sometimes officers lose sight of their primary mission, which is to preserve public safety. After all, the very reason the officer is trying to stop this suspect is because the bad guy has broken the law. Whether it's a traffic offense or something more serious, the law was most likely put in place to preserve public safety in some regard.

The bad guy breaks it, thereby endangering public safety, and the officer tries to apprehend him in order to allow the justice system to control the deviant behavior. The bad guy flees from this effort at control, and the officer gives chase in order to re-assert control.

The very nature of police pursuit is to enhance public safety. In order to pursue, we--by definition--put public safety at risk. It is the job of the officer to balance the need for the apprehension (and therefore the enhanced public safety that will result from apprehension) against the risk to public safety caused by the pursuit itself.

Under the stress of the pursuit, in that moment when body alarm response is challenging the officer's ability to rationally and analytically analyze options and select courses of action, he or she cannot afford the luxury of anger.

What can you do about it?

You cannot avoid body alarm response. It's natural and normal. All beings experience it. In fact, you don't want to avoid it--it's what makes you sharp and aware, it provides your sixth sense, your "survival awareness," and your enhanced ability to hit harder, run faster, and scream louder.

Body alarm response is a good thing. It's the outward manifestations of body alarm response, and the way that they can interfere with your other abilities, that create the problem.

These manifestations can usually be managed, and the more you can learn to control them, the calmer you will be under stress, and the greater will be your ability to think clearly, and to survive.

First of all, and probably the most important thing, is to be aware of the natural nature of body alarm response. Read about it, study it, learn all you can. Such books as An Intimate History of Killing, and Fear: A Cultural History, both by Joanna Bourke; The Gift of Fear, by Gavin De Becker; and Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, are good places to start.

Seek out formal study in fear and anger management. Learn calming techniques. Practice a martial art. Consider taking any of the excellent classes offered by Brian Willis of Winning Mind Training, or others geared toward developing your ability to enhance your mind's control over your physical reactions.

Is there a sure fire way to avoid getting caught up in pursuit fixation, or body alarm response? Not really. But there are steps you can take to enhance your ability to control this perfectly natural reaction to the tension of a high stress encounter. Then, the next time some so-and-so decides to take off on you, you'll be in better shape to safely and effectively run him to ground, and hook him up.

Jim Prouty
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:02 pm

Combat Training Principles- Secrets for Staying Alive!!

Kuma-de »

When most people think of martial arts training they
envision a class arranged in rows going through
various punching and kicking drills.

Form is emphasized to an incredible degree. I
remember early on in my martial arts training being
told by a master that until I had performed a movement
1,000 times (in this case it was a traditional reverse
punch) I would not be able to understand, nor properly
use, this strike.

So for much of my youth I would spend hour after hour
performing the various punches, kicks, and techniques
I'd been taught, until I acquired 'proficiency' in my
performance of these movements.

Often QUANTITY was emphasized over QUALITY. In fact
looking back on these training experiences I believe
the main goal was FATIGUE.

This often produced humorous results. Whenever I was
able to sneak a glance around the room, I'd notice the
agony on the faces of my fellow students as they
executed say, a high roundhouse kick, for the umpty-
umth time, -- a kick that now barely rose above knee
level!

The instructors were very SPECIFIC when it came to
form. Everything had to look just so -- and you were
judged by your ability to reproduce this look.

You
were instructed in use of your natural body weapons
but the emphasis was on form rather than function.

The subject of whether or not this particular strike
was effective or even biomechanically correct was
never addressed.


Any such questions were dismissed
with some vague reference to the art being this way
for 1000's of years, blah, blah, and blah...


Here were just some of the questions I had about
those methods:

1. What was the purpose of these drills? To make me
a better fighter? And if so, how?

2. What was the point of doing a drill to fatigue?
What did I learn from that? Did it make me better at
that drill?

3. How did the movements I learned work under the
stress of a real fight?

4. Why are some of the ways you're teaching me to
use my body seemingly more prone to hurting me than my
attacker?

Unfortunately I got nowhere asking these and other
similar questions. It took me many years of WRONG
training to find out how to correctly train my skills
for maximum fighting effectiveness under stress.

The difference is dramatic ... as are the results.

Tim Larkin

Jim Prouty
New England Budo Center
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:06 pm

How you look when you strike is a very minor concern.

I do address how you look in training but in a very
specific manner.

One that helps you to more
effectively hit your targets while generating the
MAXIMUM amount of force with each of your strikes.

Still, one of the most difficult things for me to
'unlearn' from a trained martial artist or fighter is
the formatic drills their prior training inculcated in
them.

Often I'll watch as a highly trained individual
executes a picture-perfect kick or punch during a
training session, a blow that rightfully sends the
partner reeling backwards due to the force.

Then,
however, I watch them stand in place (again, often in
a picture-perfect stance) rather than DYNAMICALLY
moving with their attacker.

With my training you won't make the same mistake.
Focus on what your goal is -- DESTROYING the other guy.
In order to do that you need to ensure you hit your targets.

If you can focus on that FIRST, I'll help you look
good doing it later.


Until next time,

Tim Larkin
Creator of Target-Focus(TM) Training
http://www.targetfocustraining.com
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:08 pm

Kuma-de »

Van, that is the point TMA's train hard but they need to put reality into the situation.

I spoke of the aforementioned in another thread on this board regarding the stress training that I put my people through when we focus upon self-defense training.

Their strikes, knee strikes, kicks and take downs are not pretty, but the focus is hitting your target and making sure you 'STOP' the assailant.

This is a great article, because we practice kata for perfection; yet we perfect self defense for living!!!

Jim Prouty
New England Budo Center
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:13 pm

Kuma-de »

Fight, Flight or Freeze
Understanding and training within the sympathetic nervous system

According to the latest research, engaging in dynamic training causes a fight or flight reflex in participants.
officer using patrol car door as cover

Once skills have been learned, survival is enhanced by scenario based training.
Officer covering wounded partner

The basics of marksmanship can be learned on the flat, square firearms range. Scenario based training makes the officer put the skill in context and deal with follow-through. In this case an officer is covering his wounded partner.
KEVIN DAVIS
Tactical Survival Contributor
Officer.com

If someone could give you a gift that would improve your chances of survival in a violent confrontation, would you take it? If the tradeoff was that, in order to make use of this gift, you would have to understand it and use it properly, would you take the time to do so?

The gift that you've already been given and have in your possession is the fight or flight reflex, more accurately called the Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) reaction.

You see, already hardwired into man is a survival system that prepares us to overcome life-threatening situations. The tradeoff is that you need to understand the mental, physical and psychological changes that take place when the SNS is activated.

Take for instance, the experiences of Major Bob Johnson, related to authors Mike Durant and Steve Hartov in the new book The Night Stalkers, as he piloted a Blackhawk helicopter during the invasion of Grenada:

He had never imagined anything like this. Not here, not today. And the phenomenon that overtook his body and his mind wasn't something he could ever have prepared for. It was total sensory overload, and combined with a flood of adrenaline surging through his blood, his fine motor skills went all to hell...this was no schoolboy hero fantasy. This was the O.K. Corral, times ten.



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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:16 pm

Kuma Dee>>


Survival Mechanisms

Man's survival mechanisms have evolved over time to increase our chance of winning a life and death struggle. Without these amazing structures and changes, we would have never made it out of the Stone Age, but rather would have become fossilized saber tooth tiger dung.

Without getting into a scientific explanation of what goes on in the brain to initiate an SNS response, let's just say that various "triggers" can make this happen. In terms of threats against you, the closer, more spontaneous, more unexpected and faster developing the threat, the more chance you may kick into an SNS response.

The result is that you may not be able to think the same, move the same, hear as well, or see as wide a visual field, and more.

As your body prepares itself for battle, stress hormones will be released into your system to fuel your body.


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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:17 pm

Training and the SNS

How can we incorporate an understanding of the SNS into our training so that it improves our survival? First of all, we must try to understand how stress affects us, what changes may take place in the body. We can anticipate that those changes will take place on the street when we attempt to use those skills.

Next as recommended by noted survival authority Bruce Siddle, we must understand that our ability to complete fine and complex motor skills is affected by stress. We should therefore train in skills that we will be able to complete and that will be enhanced to some degree by stress.

The bulk of our survival strategy should be based around gross motor skills or those skills that incorporate large muscle masses and will be strengthened by SNS.

We should then work at honing those skills through training. Repetition is the mother of all skills and develops competence. Competence breeds confidence, and the more confident in your skills you are, the less you will be affected by stress.

Finally we should engage in dynamic training scenarios. Can training cause an SNS response? PPCT Management Systems Inc. engaged in a study utilizing a Prism shooting trailer. After participants had gone through their scenarios, blood was drawn and tested for the presence of stress chemicals. According to preliminary findings,

Readings from the heart rate monitors indicated fluctuations in all study participants. Participants began with an average baseline heart rate of 82.46 BPM and then attained an average peak rate of 133.94 BPM, with some peaking as high as 175BPM.

The average heart rate increase was 65% during the event and then decreased an average of 67.65% afterward. Preliminary blood test results also indicate corresponding changes in the stress hormones cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, again confirming that survival stress was induced and with consistent reliability.

The increase in cortisol levels averaged 18.15% across the board, with peak levels increasing as much as 206.41%. Epinephrine levels climbed an average of 131.83% and norepinephrine an average of 66.26%.

--(Bruce Siddle, Kevin Siddle; PPCT; 2006)
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:19 pm

What does all this mean? That dynamic training causes the same type of changes in the body as actual combat (though to a lesser degree), and by engaging in this type of training after you've laid a foundation of proper skill, you will enhance your survival.

On the Street

Listen to researchers from the FBI as noted in the excellent new book, Violent Encounters (U.S. Dept. of Justice; 2006).

It is extremely difficult to control one's biological, psychological, and emotional reactions to life and death circumstances. But it is even more difficult to do so without adequate, realistic, and prior training--along with proper mental and physical preparation.

Training often determines which persons survive and which ones suffer injury or death. Training that is realistic, repetitive, understandable, and believable potentially reduces the nonadaptive effects of evolution.

In preparing for a highly-charged emotional event, effective and realistic training can reduce its intensity (levels of arousal), allowing higher cognitive functioning to prevail.

Take the gift you've been given, understand its strengths and limitations. Train diligently and realistically in skills that work on the street and engage in dynamic scenario based training to "pressure test" those skills and introduce yourself to the SNS response.

This mix combined with a stout warrior's heart and spirit will enable you to win. And in the end after an incident, when you're brushing the dust off your uniform, you can say, "That was just like training!"
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:22 pm

Emotional Impact

Remember where you were, a little after nine o'clock EST on the morning of September 11, 2001? Me, too. In fact, I'll bet you can remember who was with you and what they did. Remember your first high-speed pursuit? How about the very first call you responded to as a new officer? Or the first homicide victim you ever saw? These events sear themselves into memory in part because they are accompanied by strong emotion.

Modern neuroscience has discovered that both learning and emotion activate the same parts of the brain. From an evolutionary standpoint, this makes very good sense: those things you must pay attention to and learn quickly for your (and your species') survival usually involve strong emotions, such as fear (avoid a coiled rattlesnake) or anger (defend your family against attack).

Tactical instructors use the connection between memory and emotion to teach officers how to make entry and clear a room. The principles of room-clearing are nothing more than simple geometry.

You can illustrate "slicing the pie" or "buttonhook entry" for example, with lines on a chalkboard. Understanding how it works is cognitive. But if you want officers to be able to apply these cognitive principles in real situations, you're better off to hide some bad guys with Simunition® guns in a real room.

Going into the situation, the officer will already be in a state of aroused emotion--and if he or she lingers in a backlit doorway or neglects to clear a corner, the sound of gunfire and the sting of a marking cartridge will add an additional emotional wallop that drives the lesson home.

Scenario-based training always involves emotion because it mimics real life--and not just any reality, but one in which the police are needed. People don't call the police when everything is okay. They call when they are upset or afraid or angry (or someone else is).

The actors in a scenario bring emotion to their roles, the officer brings a certain level of anxiety or at least intensity, and the interaction between officer and role players generates emotional content as well. Done properly, this emotional context can speed learning and deepen memory.

But you must plan your scenarios carefully and control your role-players, because if you don't, the emotional impact in learning can backfire. As an example, take our room-clearing exercise above.

If you set up officers to be ambushed, so that even if they do everything just as they have been taught, the bad guys still "kill" them, emotion and memory will work against you. Instead of reinforcing proper tactical movement, the only lesson learned will be that entering a suspect room leads to death.

The officer who "knows" on a visceral level that death is imminent and inevitable is not likely to perform well. The brain learns the lesson presented--it will not distinguish between the good lesson and the bad.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:24 pm

Decision-Making

The other aspect of scenario-based training that makes it so effective is that it always incorporates decision-making. The officer has to make a series of decisions leading to a resolution of the call. From the outset, the officer has to decide where to stand, what to ask, whom to talk to first, and so on.

Each decision moves the story in a particular direction, so no two officers will handle a given scenario in precisely the same way. Because the role-players also respond to each decision the officer makes, any scenario can branch in different directions.

Only recently has science begun to understand how decisions are made, particularly under time-pressure.

Until just a few years ago, scientists assumed that high-stakes emergency decisions, such as those made by law enforcement officers, firefighters and military commanders, were made pretty much the same way as other important decisions, such as those made by CEOs of corporations.

The military even came up with an acronym for the process: the MDMP, or Military Decision-Making Process, was taught to field commanders. The idea behind the MDMP is that the decision-maker generates a list of all possible courses of action and then chooses the best, based on available information.
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