Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 02, 2019 4:30 am


Without the proper ‘responsibility’ mindset, you have no business owning a gun. Just as with operating a car, boat, or other machine, guns and drugs are a bad mix.

Under the category of drugs, I include alcohol. It is just a liquid drug. Anything that alters your mind and inhibits clear thinking impedes your ability to properly use your gun.

[gun control here works in screening habitual drinkers and emotional unstable people from being granted a license. If he persists in getting a gun through illegal channels_ good luck to him...here in Mass_ you get caught with it you go to jail one year...mandatory]

One of the most selfish and irresponsible acts that anyone can do is to drive drunk, yet people do it everyday. If you drink alcohol and then get behind the wheel, you are putting your own stupid selfish indulgence above the safety of everyone else, including me and my little grandkids, and I will not tolerate a drunk driver.

Drinking and handling a firearm is just as bad. If you are drinking, you shouldn’t touch a gun. If you want to drink, smoke weed, pop pills, snort coke, or anything else, that is your business as long as you are not endangering anyone else. Knock yourself out.

If you are impaired and drive on a public road or carry a gun, it becomes the business of everyone around you. Don’t do it. If you are a good ol’ boy and down a few cold ones with your buddies in hunting camp and shoot one of them, you deserve whatever the law or his kin does to you.


If you shoot yourself, don’t try to blame the gun. It is just a machine. Personal responsibility.
The proper use and handling of firearms is the personal responsibility of each of us who owns a gun.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 02, 2019 4:33 am


“CCW permit holders are virtually never involved in the commission of any crime, much less murder

- Since 1997, 30% of all school shootings have been stopped by a citizen using a firearm. Only 1% of the news stories that cover these school shootings mention this…this is very dangerous for public policy measures that rely on real and accurate data to determine deterrence actions.

- States without CCW laws account for 90% of the incidents, deaths, and injuries from public mass shootings
- States enacting CCW laws have seen an average reduction of 78% in deaths and injuries from mass shootings.


- States with less restrictive CCW laws have seen the greatest reduction in attacks, deaths, and injuries from mass shootings.

- Limiting the places where permit holders are allowed to carry increases the overall number of attacks, deaths, and injuries in those prohibited areas

- The only firearm law that reduces public mass shootings is the enactment of CCW laws.

- Laws that limit the purchase of firearms (one-a-month, waiting periods, certain gun prohibited purchases) in fact, increase the overall number of public mass shootings”
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 02, 2019 4:34 am

“There's a simple reason CCW holders as a group are so law-abiding -- they have to be law-abiding citizens in order to qualify for a permit in the first place. This is what you automatically know about a person who has a CCW in Tennessee:

• They've never been convicted of "any felony offense punishable for a term exceeding one (1) year".

• They've never been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence.

• They've never been convicted of the offense of stalking.

• They were not under indictment at the time they applied for a CCW.

• They were not the subject of an order of protection at the time they applied for a CCW.

• They haven't had a DUI in the past five years or two or more DUIs in the past 10 years

• They haven't been under treatment for or hospitalized for addiction to drugs or alcohol in the past 10 years.

• They've never been adjudicated as mentally defective.

• They've never been discharged from the military under dishonorable conditions ("dishonorable discharge, bad conduct discharge or other than honorable discharge Chapter 1340-2-5-.02 (5)").

• They've never renounced their U.S. citizenship.

• They've never received social security disability benefits "by reason of alcohol dependence, drug dependence or mental disabilities.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 02, 2019 4:37 am


9 March 2007: Division Of Gun Labor

There is little doubt in the minds of modern and progressive shooters that shooting training needs to be two components, separate in many ways and great effort should be made to distinguish the important parts fro each other.


2) Combatives


In the United States, in the 10-year period 1995-2004, the FBI reports that 268 officers were murdered within 5 feet of their assailant, and 107 were murdered within 10 feet of their assailant.

This represents nearly 3 out of 4 (or 71 percent) of ALL officers murdered by firearms (545) for which investigations were able to determine the distance between the officer and the assailant.

In the statistics of actual civilian, police and criminal combats, close up shooting is high probability and a range where marksmanship takes a back seat to a lot of smart, survival tactics.


Poor-to-moderately trained criminals do REALLY well shooting down civilians and cops and when they do" train,?" Recent studies report that criminals work on point shooting styles and much lesser on the common marksmanship found at ranges.

New FBI studies show that criminals are very, VERY good at shooting at the head when close-up. Perhaps they fixate on the face? From 15 feet or so they instinctively shoot at the chest and do quite well.

At about 21 feet, they really miss a lot, which is bad for collateral damage, as is the people around the target person may get hit.

Anyway, shooters must do both marksmanship AND combatives, but get this. I don't think you can really train combatives with live fire.

It has to be done interactive sims training. 15 minutes on the range. 45 minutes shooting at moving, thinking people that are shooting back at you.

I have organized the Gun/Counter-Gun course on this premise. Each level requires a live fire course of some type and then a sims/tactical module. See the lists on: http://www.hockscqc.com/gun/index.htm
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 02, 2019 2:12 pm

http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/ccw/continuum.htm


The psychology of self defense and the force continuum
By Syd


You have made the decision to legally carry a self defense firearm. You have selected a pistol, acquired a CCW license and hopefully learned the basics of using all of this exciting new firepower.

You have spent a lot of energy learning about pistols, cartridges, holsters, and the laws and rules concerning the carry of deadly weapons. That is all good and necessary, but it is woefully incomplete. Hopefully, a moment will come when you will step back from it all for a minute to consider what you are doing.

"If your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail," said Abraham Maslow and it was brilliant. Nowhere is this more true than in the real world use of defensive firearms. The point I'm going to make and make again, is that we need to insure that the gun isn't our only tool.

The use of a defensive firearm is not an appropriate response to the vast majority of threats, hurts and insults we receive. For normal people who don’t work in law enforcement or the military, situations in which armed self defense is justified are actually quite rare.

The odds are good that you may live your whole life without ever needing to draw a gun and fire it at another human being. I hope you do.

When you strap on a gun, you are introducing into your life the possibility that you may shoot and kill another person. This is extremely serious business. No right thinking person wants to shoot someone. It is a tragic and horrible thing.

It is expensive in every way and creates a profound legal liability. It may create an emotional and spiritual trauma. People respond to this in different ways, some having a great deal of "post traumatic stress" while others seem able to shrug it off pretty easily.

One way or the other, it leaves a mark on your soul. You don’t want to shoot someone if you don’t have to.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:42 pm

But "turn the other cheek"?

Not only is it a good idea, it's absolutely mandatory in the legal environment in which we operate.

When you begin to carry a personal defense weapon, you will immediately notice an increased reticence to get involved in the macho matches in which you may have engaged previously.


Generally, you can only use lethal force for self defense or the defense of another in response to an imminent threat of bodily harm, sexual assault or kidnap.

If you initiate a pissing match with someone which escalates into a shooting, your self defense justification is negated. You will go to jail.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 02, 2019 8:45 pm

Consequently, civility, forbearance, and patience are absolutely mandatory for the armed civilian (and that includes law enforcement personnel).

So "Turn the other cheek," "Blessed are the peacemakers," and "Thou shall not murder" will serve you well. Avoidance of conflict is always the best policy.

This is the paradox of the concealed personal defense weapon: we equip, train and prepare ourselves and then we must make every effort to avoid employing it.

If you think that your gun makes you ten feet tall and enables you to be rude, confrontational, and gives you god-like power over the people around you, think again because you're on your way to jail.


You just don't know it yet.


I would think this also goes to some MA practitioners who can sometimes display the same traits as above. We see them now and then, at times more often than we should...and we have certainly seen them here on my forum in the past.

What that denotes, as Walter Mattson quipped once, is that in all those cases there are pre-existing character defects that become amplified by the MA practice stage. I think most of you reading this here have come across some of them.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 03, 2019 2:09 am

So how do we make sure that we have more tools than just a hammer? The short answer is to prepare mind and body so that the situations in which the gun would need to be deployed will be reduced to an absolute minimum. This means the development of "empty hand" and non-lethal techniques of self defense, and improved situational awareness.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 03, 2019 2:13 am


Situational Awareness – Zanshin

At the top and bottom of the force continuum is situational awareness. The Karate term for this is zanshin. Literally, "zanshin" means something like "remaining mind," or "continuing awareness." Zanshin applies to your awareness of the world around you.

You notice the people around you – how they stand, how they carry themselves, what is in their eyes – because you need to be prepared to interact with them. You are present in the moment. The greatest self defense tool you have is between your ears.

When you are aware of the world around you, you can head off and avoid 99.44% of the situations which might force you to deploy a weapon. Even Gichin Funakoshi, the "father of modern Karate" said avoidance was the best strategy, and, if confronted by an armed [with a knife] opponent, run if you can.


In the same way, if you are planning on going somewhere that you think you’ll need your battle rifle, two backup pistols and a kevlar vest, just don’t go there. If you find yourself somewhere that doesn’t "feel right," leave.

A little bit of common sense can spare you of a lot of grief and lawyer bills. If you can’t avoid the situation, your zanshin will prepare you to respond effectively and appropriately.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:31 am

Social Confrontation vs Asocial Violence - Part 1

Tim Larkin
I've been putting up some posts on the subject of the tool of Violence. This is very different from most views on Self Defense. I think today's post clarifies exactly why this understanding is critical to you surviving what most poeple call "self-defense" situations...

SOCIAL CONFRONTATION VS. ASOCIAL VIOLENCE: DON'T GET CAUGHT IN THE TRAP

You're in fifth grade and you've had it with the school bully. He's been at you every day this year; humiliating you, taunting you, pushing you around. Giving you random shots in the arm that leave you sore for days.

You've let it slide for months because you're not a bad person. You've been taught to turn the other cheek, to meet violence with peace, knowing that bullies eventually tire and peace wins out.

But mostly you've let it slide because you're afraid.

But today is different. Today he pushed you one too many times, and too far--he pushed you over an invisible line in your head and your fear evaporated in the heat of rage. You want to give it all back to him. You put your head down and charge him, knock him back and start swinging away, landing blow after blow against the sides of his head.

He's startled but quickly recovers and gets you in a headlock. As the two of you struggle, a crowd of children gathers around you, attracted to the action like iron filings in a magnetic field, all of them chanting in joyous unison: "Fight! Fight! Fight!"

Suddenly, a teacher steps in and pulls the two of you apart, much to everyone's disappointment.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:32 am

This is pretty standard stuff. We've all been there, whether you were a participant, or in the crowd that came running to see.

Let's switch it up a bit and suppose, just for argument's sake, that instead of a fist fight the kid brings a gun to school and shoots the bully in the head.

Do you think the other kids would gather around to watch, to cheer him on? What would you do?

You'd do what any of us would do in the face of violence-- you'd get the hell out of there.

Both of these situations involve violence. So why are there two very different reactions from the crowd?

We all know real violence when we see it--someone being shot in the head, or stabbed repeatedly, or kicked to death by a mob. We have a primal, visceral reaction to the real thing. It sickens us.

And yet, we can watch a bloody and grueling title bout with nothing but excitement, cheering for our favorite as the two fighters beat each other to the point of exhaustion.

What's going on here?

It's very simple, really, and has to do with the difference between social interaction and asocial violence.


Tim Larkin
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:34 am

The first scenario (the fist fight) is inherently social; the bully, who occupies a position of power high up on the social totem pole, is being challenged. If the kid manages to cow the bully and make him cry, the kid will gain social status while the bully will lose status.

Everyone gathers around because it's important to see who will be victorious--you want to associate yourself with the winner and shun the loser.

Such an upset, such a potential drastic change in the playground pecking order, is important to witness. The outcome of this event holds many repercussions for everyone in the social order.

If the bully loses, he and his toadies will see their power eroded; kids will be less likely to hand over their lunch money. The kid who bested him will be a hero and automatically rise above the bully in social regard.

If the bully prevails, the status quo is not only maintained, but reinforced. Once again, it's extremely important, as a member enmeshed in this social order, to witness the contest and its outcome.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:36 am

The second scenario (the school shooting) is inherently asocial, that is, we instantly recognize that it has nothing to with communication and there will be no change in the social order--there will only be mayhem, death, and misery.

As such it holds no interest for the witnesses; it holds only terror.

This is what we mean when we speak of a divide between social and asocial violence. They are two very different interactions with very different expected outcomes. And confusing one for the other can get you killed.

Another way of looking at it is that one is a competition while the other is only about destruction. Competitions have rules. Destruction is just about who gets it right first... Happy Hour with all the Happy squeezed out of it!
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:37 am

If we fast-forward the school yard scenario 12 or so years we end up with a bar fight. And what do we see there?

Flaring arms and butting chests, enraged faces, shouted profanity. Throwing things. The biggest guy being 'held back' by a much smaller person. Pushing and shoving, trading punches to the head. And, more often than not, grappling and rolling around on the ground.

This is classic inter-male aggression; it's what you get when you mix alcohol, testosterone, and territorial tendencies in the presence of available females.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:39 am

And it's the same behavior seen across the animal kingdom. The thrashing, ranting and raving of the silverback gorilla, the head butting of rams, the clashing of male grizzly bears.

All of these displays have everything to do with communicating displeasure and the threat of violence, but rarely, if ever, result in killing.


The goal is to cow the interloper and run him off your territory, thereby gaining social status.

Every aspect of the display is designed to convince the rival that they should capitulate. The screaming and shouting, the angry faces say "I'm seriously agitated!"

The flaring arms and out-thrust chests are to make the person look bigger in an attempt to scare off the rival.

Pushing and shoving are for physical intimidation and to show strength and power.

Punches to the head are communication as well; interacting with the head and face are an attempt to access and show displeasure with the person who resides in the body.

Clinching and rolling around on the ground is a great way to look viciously engaged without hurting or getting hurt.

The bar fight looks and sounds like it does because it is a display, meant to be seen and heard by all those in attendance.

The participants are doing these things because no one really wants to seriously injure the other; in fact, if you interrupted them and offered them handguns to shoot at each other they'd probably think you were insane.

Asocial violence is brutally streamlined by comparison.

It starts quietly, suddenly, and unmistakably. It's knocking a man down and kicking him to death. It's one person beating another with a tire iron until he stops moving. It's stabbing someone 14 times. It's pulling the gun and firing round after round into him until he goes down and then stepping in close to make sure the last two go through the brain.


If you're a sane, socialized person, those images make you physically ill. That's because you recognize them for what they are--asocial violence. The breakdown of everything we humans hold dear, the absence of our favorite construct, the very fabric of society itself. It's an awful place where there's no such thing as a 'fair fight' or honor.

It's the place where there are no rules and anything goes.

It's the place were people kill and get killed.

----- end of Part 1 -----

In Part 2... why asocial violence is such a very different beast than we've been led to believe, and why you cannot handle it using social tools. In fact, attempting to do so is what makes the average citizen such a brilliant victim.

All for now,
Tim Larkin
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