Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Dgharkins » Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:12 pm

Great Posts, thanks Van. Tim Larkin has some great YouTubes as well. He’s the real deal. See you soon.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 06, 2019 11:09 pm

Thanks Dennis...I like his no nonsense approach...and as you know, in my classes I do emphasize the target focus practice with the 'Bob' that also gives us feedback on any strike....power or powder puff.

See you soon.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:01 pm

Dennis, this from Larkin always worth reading especially by the people who feel invincible...At best what we do or we see masters do, is all marginal when it comes to the world of real violence.

https://timlarkin.com/blog/prevent-viol ... e-part-ii/

Now you can see where our problem, as instructors, lies (and maybe even some problems of your own). When people see the man getting stabbed, they want to know how to stop that from happening to themselves, and they assume — wrongly — that there is some kind of physical action that can keep them safe from such things.

So they are looking for physical training to prevent violence. And there is no such thing.

Because we are looking at different sides of the equation (they see the man getting stabbed, I see the man doing the stabbing), the answers don’t always fit the question. When someone asks, “What do I do if the man wants to stab me?”

and I show them how to take his eye, crush his throat, and break his leg, they are usually aghast at the “severity” of the action, as well as being uncomfortable since I really didn’t do anything about the knife.

When they ask, “How can I prevent him from stabbing me?” and I launch into a discussion of social/anti-social/asocial and mention running away, using your words, letting him have the parking space, etc., they are even more puzzled. What they really want is a way to not get stabbed once the stabbing starts, and that’s impossible.
Tim Larkin
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:02 pm

You can’t prevent violence once it’s on, and if all you want is to change someone’s behavior, violence can’t do that. All it does is break down the human body, and shut off the brain.

While some of you may want to argue that technically you prevent violence with violence by shutting the other guy off, please remember that that occurs only as a side effect.

The goal must be to break things inside of him and take him to nonfunctional. If the goal is to prevent him from stabbing you, you’re at odds with the goal that will actually get that done.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:07 pm

Understanding that what people really want is an easy, painless way of preventing violence from happening, rather than to learn how to be the one doing it, cleared up a lot of misunderstanding for me as an instructor.

It’s much easier for me to communicate when I know this is the baseline assumption. From the other side, it’s important to make it clear that there is no physical action that makes you safe.

Physical action is not the path to safety, it’s the path to ruin the other guy.


If you want to prevent violence, be smart and use your social skills. But once the violence starts, the only thing that’s going to change the situation in your favor is hurting him. Confuse the two at your own peril.
Larkin

This is pretty hard to take for most of us for a number of reasons. I have covered all this in detail...give it some thought.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:13 pm

What really scares people/martial artists included, the most? Think about it.

https://timlarkin.com/blog/self-defense ... r-beating/

When you think about self-defense in a life-or-death physical altercation, what scares you the most? I’m willing to bet your biggest fear is that the other guy will hurt you.

Whether he does it with a gun, a knife, a club or fists and boots, you are preoccupied with stopping him from hurting you.

And so you seek out things to mollify those fears — gun disarms, knife defense, stick fighting and self-defense techniques to block punches and kicks.

All the while you’re missing what makes him so powerful: not caring about any of those things.

If you have a gun, what’s your priority, shooting him or worrying about countering gun disarms?

Does the one doing the stabbing care at all about knife defense?

The last thing on your mind if you’re busting limbs and heads with a baseball bat is whether or not the other guy will take it away from you.

Thinking it’s any different with fists and boots is what separates the person delivering the beating from the person taking one. Larkin


Your martial arts training notwithstanding...you are never that far away from a street beating every time you step out from the house.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:16 pm

Self-defense is first and foremost about preventing the other guy from hurting you — talking him out of it, running away, techniques to stymie his attempts at harm. The first two are great if you can get them (and really, I shouldn’t have to tell you to avoid trouble if you can).

For our purposes, I’m going to assume you can’t get away to safety and the only thing left is violent action, which leaves us with the third element of self-defense: stopping the other guy from hurting you.

Why practice techniques that take time and constant practice when it can be demonstrated that people with no training or experience win at violence every day?

They win by having a superior perspective — caring about nothing but delivering a beating — and then get to work creating results.

No training, no practice, just an all-consuming intent to cause harm.
Larkin

Think about this...I think the tools for the 'beating' are a must...and so how do you get them and what defines 'tool'
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:17 pm

If you’re concerned about stopping or controlling him, you’re mucking about at the completely wrong end of things, placing yourself in the unenviable position of trying to prevent a beating instead of delivering one. Contrary to popular myth, you can’t do both at once.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:20 pm

Fighting is about engaging with the other guy’s athleticism and skill.

You’re really only going to do well if you are bigger, faster, stronger and he doesn’t cheat. If you’re there to fight and he’s just there to deliver a beating, you’ve got your work cut out for you.

If he’s just there to scrap also, chances are someone may get their ass kicked, but no one will get seriously hurt (unless someone falls down and hits their head on concrete).

The real danger lies in not knowing his true intentions until either a) he’s killing you or b) he resorts to cheating or pulling a weapon to even the odds as you start to win the fight.

And while “fighting” seems like it would be the same as “delivering a beating” (or at least containing the concept), “fighting” implies a back-and-forth while “delivering a beating” is necessarily one-sided.
Larkin

this is the critical component in martial arts training that no teacher ever really touches upon in class...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:22 pm

Hand-to-hand combat suffers from the same problem. While the word “combat” has military connotations and thus sounds more serious and dire than mere “fighting” —

the implication being that while you may just get your ass kicked in a fight, you can actually die in hand-to-hand combat — it still lacks the unidirectional focus of “delivering a beating”.

Again, what makes that imaginary adversary powerful, dangerous and fear-inducing? The idea that all he wants is to hurt you.

The other guy is scary because he’s just there to deliver a beating. He just wants to hurt you, break you, put you down and make you stay there.

The only hope you have of at least evening the odds is to see it the same way. See yourself as the one delivering the beating and train accordingly.


And of course be ready to fight the next enemy...the criminal and civil courts.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:26 pm

Which brings up the next item for discussion/learning....

https://timlarkin.com/blog/self-protect ... -violence/

Losing or winning with action or even lack of action sometimes...create some serious questions:

Tobias from Sweden writes in this self protection question:

“I find myself agreeing more and more about your specific way of thinking when it comes down to surviving life-or-death self-defense situations, especially in regards to the fact that the bad guys don’t operate by the laws of society and therefore, in survival, neither can we.

I am curious how one can explain and justify the violence used to the police or court after such a self-defense incident has occurred, given that here in Sweden, there seems to be some misconception that if I hurt the bad guy, who initially tried to do harm to me, it somehow grants him, ‘Oh poor him you injured him so now I can face criminal charges,’ type of BS.

I know you don’t hand out legal advice, but I am curious about how you would justify or explain it all…”

Tobias,
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 12:23 am

Tobias,

Since I have no experience with Swedish law, I can only comment on American law (and even that varies from state to state).

The general principle here is that if you were afraid for your life – that is, that a reasonable person would expect to be killed or seriously harmed if they did not act – then it is justified self-defense.

If you were afraid for your life, and can explain the reasons for that fear in such a way that makes sense to the average citizen, then you’re better off, at least in a legal sense.

But even here, and even under such real threat with clear articulation after the fact, the legal issues surrounding self protection questions can get difficult. This is why we make it so clear in our training that it’s not for trivial use.


Injuring someone just because they “pissed you off” or were “asking for it” – in other words, for social or antisocial reasons – will get you in a lot of legal trouble regardless of where you live.
Tim Larkin
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 12:28 am

Here's the kicker
If you were afraid for your life, and can explain the reasons for that fear in such a way that makes sense to the average citizen, then you’re better off, at least in a legal sense.


Just a general statement about being in fear of your life or suffering terrible injuries...won't be enough...we will have to sound reasonable and convincing to a juror 'who has never been there before'...

In other words, can we put the jury members in our shoes at the moment of the assault?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 12:30 am

Restricting the use of the tool of violence to only the most dire situations, ones that involve killing or at least serious harm without direct action, will go a long way toward not only giving you the best chance for survival, but also giving you the greatest chance of being on the right side of the law when it’s all done.

How can you tell it’s dire? When you have no choice.

As we like to point out, if you have to ask, the answer is “no.” If you’re wondering whether or not you should hurt the man or worrying about how the law would view what you’re thinking of doing, it’s because you know, on some level, it’s not appropriate.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 08, 2019 12:36 am

So, in answer to your self protection question: The way we here in the States would make sure the use of violence is legally defensible is by only using it when we are truly afraid for our lives. That’s what the American legal system will look for to excuse it or not.

And, yes, this is not legal advice — for that, I suggest you contact a lawyer in your local state or district.
Tim Larkin

Here is where many martial artists will get into trouble, simply because it will be almost impossible to 'walk away' from a 'lesser' offense...given their 'martial persona'

We have seen sobering examples of this here on the forum in the past...it is the human condition and it is lying there in wait for you to destroy all that you thought you were....it has a name..."Emotional High-jacking"
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