Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 4:53 am

"When someone is violent in a hospital, six people are used to restrain the person," he said. "In the street, it's you and your partner. There's no one else, nothing to help you out. Whatever comes out of it is what happens, which is why so many people get injured. It's a crazy situation."

Nearly every city EMT has a story about being attacked.

Jim Allen, 33, who has worked as an EMT for 11 years, said it's not uncommon for people to start yelling as his ambulance passes and to "make violent gun gestures."

"I've been bitten by more people than dogs," he said. "It seems every other call they dislike you for something. I think it's because of the badge we wear."

Alcohol and drug abuse are fueling the violence against EMTs. Zach Schiess, 29, who has worked as an EMT for six years, said he was called to a bar in South Boston after a man's arm was twisted in a fight.

When he arrived, he said, the man and his girlfriend started swinging at him and his partner, forcing them to lock themselves in their ambulance.

"You can never take for granted what can happen when someone is drunk," he said.

City EMTs receive at least eight months of training, from life support to how to use the radios to how to operate the ambulances. The advanced EMTs, or paramedics, receive two years of training, which includes more advanced life-saving techniques.

Serino said all EMTs are trained to manage aggressive behavior, but he said, "We're always looking for ways to improve our training."
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 4:55 am

To cope with the stresses of the job, one city paramedic is writing about his experiences on a blog, "Other People's Emergencies: Random Thoughts of an Urban Paramedic."

Jay Weaver, a 22-year veteran and the author of urbanparamedic.blogspot.com, has been stuck with a needle by an AIDS patient, confronted people wielding guns and knives, and dragged three blocks by a man who grabbed him through the window of a car.

On his blog, he covers subjects ranging from how EMTs deal with drunken doctors interfering at scenes, how they subdue people trying to commit suicide, and among other things, how they handle grumpy patients and drivers who cut off their ambulances.

At the end of a December entry titled "Danger," the 47-year-old paramedic wrote: "We are forever one misstep away from serious injury or even death. The next time we fly through an intersection, the impact might be more powerful.

The next time I get stuck with a needle, it just might contain a lethal virus. The next time I walk through a door in the projects, there might be a lunatic waiting for me on the other side with a handgun or a knife. I'm not going to dwell on any of this. You can't do the job if you're afraid of each call."

On a recent shift, Weaver and his partner weaved through rush-hour traffic. They raced through streets that looked like parking lots for calls that required them to do everything from subduing a large psychiatric patient who began beating his social worker on Boston Common to treating a father who was stabbed while taking his 2-year-old son for a stroll in Charlestown.

At the end of the night, as their radio continued to squawk, Weaver said the key to surviving was expecting the unexpected.

"We have family members screaming in our face and people throwing things at us," he said. "You just don't know what you're going to experience on any call."

David Abel can be reached at dabel@globe.com.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 4:57 am

By John R. Ellement, Globe Staff |

Major crimes on the MBTA dropped by about 3 percent systemwide during the first half of this year, but increases were reported on the Orange Line and at commuter rail stations, Transit police said yesterday.

Authorities credited the improved safety record to a patrol plan that keeps officers in the same districts, an increase in the number of officers, and to closed-circuit camera systems on some buses and at the system's subway and commuter rail stations.

"Crime is down on the MBTA and up in the neighborhoods and nationally," Deputy Chief John Martino said in a telephone interview yesterday.

Despite the overall positive news, the system has also endured shocking crimes during the first half of the year, including the killing of an 18-year-old man inside a crowded T bus in Dorchester. Also this year, a man was stabbed at the Orange Line's Back Bay station, and another was shot at Ruggles station.

Decreases in crimes were reported on the Red and Blue subway lines and on bus lines. Reported serious crime dropped to zero on the Silver Line, which had just seven episodes during the first half of 2006, the statistics show.

But the Orange Line saw a 25 percent increase during the six months of this year, compared to the same period in 2006, with 128 crimes reported to police.

Transit police commanders said yesterday that the Orange Line increase grew out of a wave of robberies involving young people stealing iPods in the evenings during the spring.

Yesterday, passengers interviewed at several Orange Line stations said they considered the subway line to generally be safe, but they asked for a more visible police presence and evidence that security cameras are in use.

Jody Mendoza and her brother, David, said they have been using the Orange Line for just a few months, but said they felt safe.

"People will get more dramatic than necessary," said Jody Mendoza. "You might have some random bad luck. . . . But if you are not looking for trouble, it is not coming to you."

The other problem spot was on the commuter rail system, where 40 percent more incidents were reported over the 2006 total of 58. Police said the increase was due to break-ins of cars in commuter rail lots, not because of violence.

Transit police will number about 275 this fall after 18 officers graduate from the police academy, Martino said.

He said he is optimistic that crime will continue to decline on the MBTA.

John Ellement can be reached at jellement@globe.com.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 4:59 am

Yell "FIRE!" if you are in trouble or see someone else in trouble. You have to attract some attention. And a fire gets everybody's attention.


"When the goof steps into the arena, he knows what he is going to say, what he's gonna do, what he's gonna take, and where he's gonna run.

And what do you know? Nothing! That's why they win."
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:00 am

Pride is no comfort when a guy you didn't even see sticks a knife though your spine. Got a friend who's constantly in trouble? Who is always in hostile arguments and fights with people?

Who always has some "enemy" he can't stop thinking about and won't stay away from or reconcile with? Does this friend have a addictive behavior problem (ie drugs/drunk/gambling)?

Does he associate with known criminals or bad-attitude losers? If any of the above applies, you'd better drop him like a bad habit, otherwise he'll drag you into his troubles.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:02 am

In an emergency, the mind is often frozen with indecision.

Weapons
The only effective weapon is the one that is used. Carrying a weapon is not a deterrent - its only advantage is during the fight.

Brandishing: It is illegal to display a gun or knife to try to deter an attack. They should only come into view as you are using them to stop an attack.

Training: If you plan to carry a weapon, get the best training you can. Ask your local law enforcement folks who provides their training, and join in. You'll meet new friends among our men and women in blue, too.

A good course emphasizes defensive tactics and safe retreat. Join a sport that demands safe, ongoing practice with your weapon, such as practical shooting.

Remember that your karate classes teach you squat about street tactics.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:03 am

Crash the Car: If you have been forced into a vehicle, make every attempt to cause a traffic accident and crash the vehicle. By getting you into the vehicle, they attackers have shown they plan to seriously injure or kill you. Your chances are better in causing an accident and escaping in the confusion.


Now listen_ if you crash the car intentionally_ do not tell the police officers that’s what you did in order to escape.

Tell them you were scared to death and the fear affected your driving resulting in the accident.

You don’t want the police to put in the police report that you caused an accident intentionally, because you might be criminally charged if you injure/kill someone and your insurance company will not pay for damages beyond compulsory.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:05 am

Look out for personality disorders….more common than you think.


http://www.gaianar.com/RFP/Injury%20and ... orders.htm


Here is one we see very often

Megalomania
People with this disorder tend to believe they are superior to everyone else.

When the insanity is triggered, the victim will believe his Intelligence and Wisdom are two points higher and Strength and Dexterity are one point higher.

Moreover, the megalomaniac will believe that his or her Comeliness and Charisma are three points higher than what is actually the case.

So annoying is the megalomaniac that the perceived Charisma is actually three points less than actual (for each intensity of the insanity.)

The trigger for this insanity is any situation in which leadership is required and that the megalomaniac has at least some chance of being qualified to lead.

It should definitely be noted that the victim of megalomania’s self-perceived attribute increases are illusionary.

All checks relating to Wisdom, Intelligence, Strength, and Dexterity remain unmodified.


Think hard…easy to spot…
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:39 am


Napoleonic Complex

Victims of this insanity feel the compulsion to prove their self-worth through fighting. Typically, victims of Napoleonic complex will pick fights with people of larger stature. The trigger for this illness is whenever tall, muscular people taunt the victim.

Paranoia

The primary indicator of this illness is a complete lack of ability for the victim to trust anybody.

Victims of paranoia will typically see ulterior motives in all things, will always suspect treachery, and will never take statements at face value.

If a Panic check is failed, the victim will absolutely not believe truthful statements made by companions and bystanders.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 22, 2019 11:28 am

Yell very loud and try to sound authoritative rather than panicked. Do not yell, "Help!" instead yell, "Call 911!" or "Call the Police!"

When people hear cries for help there are several reasons why they do not intervene; they are unsure that there is a real life-threatening situation happening, they fear for their own safety in getting involved and/or they believe that somebody else will respond to the cries.


If you yell "Call 911!" it has two important psychological impacts on those who hear it; it sounds like an order and in emergency situations most untrained people need to be told what to do, and it makes it clear that somebody needs immediate help.


Some safety advisors will tell you to yell, "Fire!" This is another good strategy but can backfire in settings where it is easy to verify if there really is a fire.

What yelling "Fire!" usually will do is cause others to come out of their homes out of curiosity and in doing so they may spook your attacker or come to your rescue when they see what is really happening.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 23, 2019 1:11 pm

Some of the real life attacks:

What is likely to happen?

*Right hook to the head.

*looping overhead right.

*Two handed shove.

* Left handed shove with looping right.

• Left handed lapel grab with looping right.

*swinging left hook to the head.

• Head butt/maybe preceded by two hand lapel grab.

• Side headlock and punches to the head.

• Waist tackle.

• Right hook to the head.

• Lead hand shove.

• Lead hand hair grabs.

• Right shoulder grab… killing your main weapon delivery system.

• Slapping hooks to face.

• Uppercut with rear hand.

• Rear bear hug.

• Head ‘dunk’ with lead hand.

• Front headlock and choke.

• Drag downs.

• Pin and pummel

• Toe kicking with shoes/heel stomping/jump stomping/

• wall smash/

• Right hand elevator chokes with right uppercut.

• Spit and pummel



The class workouts should include learning to deal with such attacks on a consistent basis.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby paulg » Wed Jul 24, 2019 11:14 am

Thank you for this, Sensei Van. Note how many of these typical attacks are right handed head punches. Not all of them but a good proportion. This is what we have in mind when we practice the 'In Real Life' (IRL) drill at the Hut. Only six techniques, but proven to work in street experience and using only gross motor movements.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 25, 2019 7:16 pm

Thank you Paul, and I think your approach with basic/gross motor action/simple techniques is really the best approach...as in so many cases we see and hear of experienced karate people ending up in a flailing response under the kick of the sudden adrenaline dump. All the great techniques we pull in the dojo cease to exist under a vicious attack.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 29, 2019 2:27 pm

Let us take an example:

Getting back to your car in the mall parking lot with packages in your hand_ someone big and mean looking _sneaks up on you [awareness will only get you so far] and with his hands in his pockets commands “ give me your wallet or I’ll blow your head off” _

It doesn’t take much time to utter those words_

How long does it take for the meaning of those words to sink in through he initial denial stage of the average martial arts practitioner?


One thing is readily apparent_ you are in ‘the kill zone’ _

After the ‘sinking in’ time …there will be ‘decision time’ to act and how_

During the ‘decision time frame’ you think_ he might not be armed after all, and maybe his intent is not to strong arm you or rob you, despite your perceptions of the ‘AOJ’ triad [ ability_ opportunity_ and belief of being in imminent jeopardy of death or grave bodily harm] _

So the thought flashes _ any action you take under the stress of the moment, especially if you draw a weapon… can escalate the situation and get you in the dumpster.

Any ‘counter offense’ as Wes points out…to be effective, in my opinion, is to happen while the threat is still talking…he talks and you act…

Is your brain trained to instantly ‘seize’ the situation_ accommodate all the above thinking process then launch the counter offense just as the threat is at the end of his words?

Can you really count on having every question resolved 100% before you act?

There are many factors involved in such cases outside your immediate sphere of perceived control.

There could be more ‘thinking’ _

“I might well not be up for this confrontation_ he looks too big, too strong, too mean”

“I might be in the wrong place at a serious wrong time”

“I might be very ill- equipped _ physically or weapons wise_”

“Do I just toss him my wallet and flee?”

“Well, if I do that he will know who I am and where I live…do I care or do I not?”

“Do I run [if I can] chancing an attack at my shoulders? Will he pull a gun and shoot me in the back as I try to run? Can I really run or am I too old, too fat and out of shape?”

“ what if I smack him with my empty hands ‘weapons’ without much effect…pissing him off and causing him to pull a weapon to which I then have to react?”

“Well, maybe with his hands in the pockets he must be armed…so do I pull my gun or knife hoping to escalate my response to exceed his threat capabilities? And once pulled what do I do or say? “

“You think…with all the possible above solutions…it is critical that you get out of ‘the hole’ ‘the kill zone’ _

What else could be happening?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 29, 2019 2:28 pm

mikex1337 »

Great response, Van Canna. Very interesting analysis of the situation of "the kill zone."
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