Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:44 pm

Paul
So this is what I think: the practice we do in the dojo serves to calm us and make us feel temporarily safe ( then the anxieties of the ordinary day build and we need to practice again, and then again.) This is of great value in our day to day lives, even if we would actually revert to the much more primitive and basic moves in a real situation. Fortunately, few of us ever encounter the 'real situation.' Some people have seen the IRL (In Real Life) drill we developed at the Hut; six very basic "go-to" moves that we drill repeatedly... this exercise has some of the qualities stated above. The moves are basic, gross-motor and fairly natural (even a person with no karate training would be likely to try to use them.)


So true, Paul...thanks for the post. I think it would be helpful for the readers to at least have an idea of the moves in your IRL drill...perhaps also an incentive for some to come down to the hut for the experience.

Back where I come from, I witnessed someone knifed to death...the knifer just ran at him from a short distance with a blade and stabbed him in the heart.

The victim just froze at the sight of the knife, as well as the witnesses also freezing. It is difficult to relate the 'horror' of the moment when all seems to take on a surrealism that shocks a victim into helplessness, even with training, because the mind cannot deal with that unexpected ferocity.

Nevertheless...training is important in any way shape or form as it betters our chances of survival...but is also equally important to realize that training never promised us a 'rose garden'...this is crucial because many people die just because of 'training brainwashing' where they fail to take preclusive action available in some other way.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:47 pm

what I could have done vs. what I did

Chris McKaskell »

Bear with me here - this is a little like therapy. Only not.

Years ago I found myself with a knife (a bowie as it happens :) ) pointed into my throat.

My attacker was the feared eldest brother of a remote aquantance: not well known to me, but familiar enough that I chose to play certain odds: to wit, I chose to do nothing and hoped he was merely trying to intimidate me while showing off for his friends. My money was on the notion that he would eventually let me go unharmed.

Sure enough my bet paid off and I was released with only a small wound under my chin.

Event done.

Except that it has stuck with me all this time. I often find myself day dreaming by working my way through different ways of dealing with this and similar threats. Super hero stuff mostly -- fancy disarms etc. nothing really useful.

I find a great deal of the material presented on this forum especially helpful in terms of preparation for potential threat.

But also it has helped me to find a sense of peace with an old bit of baggage: at the time I took into account how many people were there, how I might escape, what the likelihood of me being grievously injured was and I think I made the right decision.

The kind of material that Van has presented here and that you have commented on has helped me reach the decision that I did the right thing at the time.

Proof? I'm here today writing this.

I don't know what happened to my attacker, But several members of the group who were there that day went to jail for charges including armed assault and manslaughter within a few years of my experience.

Me? I went home after being released and cleaned out the cut on my neck, licked my emotional wounds and told no one about it....till now.

Would I do things different today? Yes! I wouldn't deviate from my path of escape to talk to them in the first place. I would keep right on going past!!!!

Many thanks, Van and contributors.

Chris
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:49 pm

Chris,

I am happy that what we write is helping you find some peace of mind.

The ‘haunting’ goes on for more people than you might suspect.

And of ‘baggage”? Not to fret, my friend. Truth is that just about anyone reading this on my forum now _ has baggage carrying skeletons in their closets ….there is so much baggage here that if those skeletons decided to drop it all at once, this website would disappear in a sucking sound down a black cyber-hole.

Some of those people deny it and fry in ‘mea culpa’ whereas you have come forth with courage and integrity, smashing through the ‘cocoon’ I often write of.

We have also seen many changes here. Once what we wrote, in fact even what GEM sensei wrote in his article _ would have stirred ire and contempt in traditional practitioners reading these pages. Now they remain silent.

It is a very slow process to reconcile folklore with reality and emotional quakes, some of which you relate so poignantly.

As we can learn more by your experience, would you mind relating more of the experience? The background of it and circumstances leading to your ‘event’?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:58 pm

Chris McKaskell »

Thanks for your comments.

I’m happy to set the scene for others to examine:

- Summer time, I’m on my bike riding the trail along the river. It’s wooded and fairly dense – an area subject to seasonal flooding. Familiar terrain.

- Traveling south there are rapids to my right and, although I can’t see them through the forest, I know there is a series of seldom used parking lots about 300 yds to my left. These parking lots are seldom used because of a high incidence of vandalism.
Beyond these lots are the apartment buildings they are supposed to serve. On the main floor of one of these there is a variety store – it’s probably 600 yards through dense forest from where I am now. That’s the closest place where help might be found.

- The area is usually very quiet and peaceful – not many people come down here. Any vandalism occurs at night when the wackos come out.

- Just beyond the parking lots is a small clearing to my left with a makeshift fire pit and several logs to sit on. It is perhaps 30 yds off my trail – visible, but private enough that trail users and anyone sitting on a log there can easily ignore each other.

- There are five people sitting in the clearing – I recognize all of them from around the neighborhood. I’m aware that the males are trouble-makers (most likely responsible for much of the vandalism that takes place in the lots), but never-before threatening. Familiar enough. Four males and one female. I’m not particularly familiar with the female.

- One of them calls to me and hales me over.

- I comply.

- Everyone is sitting, I’m standing beside my bike – I had to dismount in order to approach them.

- I don’t remember what they said. I do remember the fellow in the centre of the group suddenly standing, casually strolling over to me as he pulled a knife from behind and grabbed my shirt with his left hand while he brought the tip of the knife into contact with the soft area under my chin. All very slow and smooth.

- I stood in complete disbelief as things unfolded in front of me. It was very much as if I wasn’t part of the action. Merely a witness.

- The point was sharp and stung a little.

- Then things became crystal clear: no-one else had moved and each of them had a kind of smirking, knowing look on their face as if I had suddenly become the centre of their secret little in-joke.

- My bike had fallen behind me (I must have started back, but have no recollection of moving) – it was now a tripping hazard.

- The logs were arranged in a sort of triangle with me standing at the apex where the path arrived. There was a male on the log to my left, the female sitting beside him; the base of the triangle was where my attacker had been sitting and the other two males were sitting to my right.

- One of the strange thoughts that entered my head was that I could run, but then I would lose my bike.

- Running seemed pointless: everyone was much larger than me and faster.

- I didn’t feel there was any way out but forward.

- The fellow with the knife did all the talking while the others laughed and cajoled. Mostly it was just taunts and insults – the kind of trash intended to humiliate me in front of his friends.

- I was mostly quiet – responding only when I felt that not responding might make things worse. And always responding in a calm, humble kind of way – not mewling simply matter of fact and calm.

- At one point two joggers went by on the path heading north. A man and a woman. They looked at us, but saw nothing out of the ordinary and continued on their way. I remained still and quiet, but took this as my cue to do something.

- Hoping to elicit some kind of change and betting that the brief appearance of the joggers had made everyone aware of the possibility of witnesses I calmly suggested that I was indeed worth little more than garbage, but that I was hardly worth the trouble of police investigation if he was going to kill me.

I also pointed out that I was expected home several hours ago and that people would likely be looking for me.

- And that was it. As quickly as I was taken I was discarded again like a plaything which had become no longer amusing.

Long time ago, but I gotta admit, I still get angry when I think about it -- F**king A**h*les!
Chris
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:17 pm

- I stood in complete disbelief as things unfolded in front of me. It was very much as if I wasn’t part of the action. Merely a witness.


This is a very common response action in victims...the mind refuses to acknowledge something so horrifying in the process of happening, and this is talked about by the lethal force trainers in great detail.

Psychological Splitting -- the more highly trained a person is, the apt more he or she is to experience this (happened to Ayoob in 1971). When you have trained something to the point that you can do it on autopilot -- coupled with something that triggers fight or flight -- the body moves so fast that the conscious mind can't keep up.

This can result in the perception of watching oneself do something. Ayoob counsels that if one experiences this, one is well served not to mention it in the initial debrief to local law enforcement; they may think you're crazy.

It is also seen in gunfights with persons who think they are about to die. Its cause is that survival instinct is taking all the senses into overdrive, into hyper-perception one might say. In this state, the mind can generate 3-D images from sounds and recollected sights.

Even when the body is unconscious, the ears still hear and -- if they are open -- the eyes can still see. Even at clinical death, the brain lives for another 8-10 minutes (ask any EMT).
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:18 pm

Chris McKaskell »

Hmmm, why did I heed the call over ?

It was both flattering and exciting to have the neighbourhood tough guys asking me to come over and talk with them.

Duuhhh...

Chris
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:36 pm

Thanks for the detailed response Chris.

Let’s analyze this one step a time.

A trail in dense woods _ an area in proximity to parking lots deserted because of high incidence of vandalism originating from the wooded area, I presume, with great cover and opportunity to disappear.

You used to bike there and that is fine. Did you ever concern yourself with the possibility of an assault for any reason? :?:

Here I think we see the lesson about 'dangerous environments' ...thoughts of predicting what might go wrong and avoidance.

Had you ever noticed any ‘tough guys’ in the area before?

Did you have any ‘gut feelings’ about what was about to happen?

An isolated area and you were being ‘cut from the herd’ _


That was a very bad psychological experience, something that flashes back now and then accompanied with anger and resentment. Worse than getting a physical beating.

I can sense the demons rising in your soul.

BTW, did you experience any body alarm reactions?


* Tunnel Vision -- the mind focuses on the deadly threat to the exclusion of much of one's ordinary peripheral vision. It appears as if one is looking at the threat through a tube (or tunnel, precisely), and it requires conscious effort to see more than a few degrees to the right or left, or up or down. This can be a problem if you're dealing with multiple opponents.

A man with a knife five yards away appears to be five feet away.

If you experience such physio-psychological aspects in a violent encounter -- and don't recognize them for what they are -- and recount your (distorted) perceptions to police, you can be in world of trouble when your case goes to court.

Denial Response -- On an otherwise normal day, you get a call out of the blue telling you that your mother has died. Your first response? "No! Mother can't be dead!" Another common example is people yelling "no" at a car that's about to hit them, or hit someone else.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:48 pm

Chris McKaskell>>

Can you explain what made you feel flattered and excited?



****Simply the notion that these feared and ‘important’ people would want to speak with me was enough at the time – I know how stupid that sounds, but at the time the notion of minor acquaintance with them could mean safe passage in the future and a little more respect or notoriety from my peers. Had I not gone over they could easily have tracked me down anyway – they knew where I lived.****

In many ways I am grateful for the experience: it was a dry run at a potentially deadly encounter. I learned a great deal about vigilance and awareness from it that I still practise today – there’s the silver lining!

I can’t say how many situations I’ve managed to avoid just because of lessons learned from this small incident – and I’m under no illusions about how insignificant this story is compared with stories of violence perpetrated.

Put in perspective it was no big deal at all except as a really valuable lesson.**** Yeah.

Chris
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:53 pm

RESPONSE TO PREDATION

By: Skip Gochenour

Predator and Prey Strategies

All animals, including man, are faced with the problem of predation. When a predator enters an environment occupied by prey an interaction begins in which the predator and the prey are faced with decisions on how to proceed.

Each participant has a narrow range of strategies and behaviors in which to accomplish their respective goals.

For the predator the strategy generally is to construct a condition where he can approach the prey to within a critical distance where he can successfully execute his strike.

For the prey the strategy is to fight, flee or freeze.

The narrow range of these strategies sets conditions where the behaviors of the respective parties are recognizable to the other as they are being executed.

VCA Predation Strategies


Critical distance, the distance at which a predator can successfully launch an attack, may vary according to their chosen implement of attack, but most frequently is measured in feet.

There are exceptions such as those seen in the Beltway Snipers who practiced their craft in the DC area in the fall of 2002 and Charles Whitman who used the tower of a Texas university in 1966, but most commonly VCA choose to work at nearly touching distance.


To reach critical distance the VCA commonly looks for physical environments where he can take advantage of conditions that will restrict the successful flight of his prey.

Constricted areas such as rooms, areas between parked vehicles, the interiors of vehicles and such allow the VCA to acquire critical distance.

VCA also use the behavior of their prey to enhance their ability to reach critical distance by observing which, in the number of possible targets, are distracted by attention to common personal duties and activities that make up the daily life.

While less common, it is certainly not uncommon for the VCA to loiter about in a location that will bring the prey into critical distance, even if that location is an open area such as a street.

When the prey places themselves into critical distance, the VCA executes his strike.

VCA working in teams will most often operate in concert to maneuver and restrict the flight options of their prey.

The common feature of VCA activity is to create circumstances where critical distance necessary for their strike is reached.

The recognition of this feature should serve as an alarm that activates in the Practitioner a pre-loaded response designed to first confirm the actual nature of the threat and to implement the solution available.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:58 pm

Chris McKaskell »

Van, great comments and information, thank you.

I’m curious about what people might do with this one:

1) I’m living with my then wife and infant daughter in the apartment above the Dojo, Cold Mountain, located on the north east corner of Logan and Simpson in Toronto.

2) It’s mid-November, 11:30 PM, Thursday evening, temperature outside is just a few degrees above freezing. The minor intersection outside is illuminated by the near-by street lamps. Occasional passing cars – very low volume. Older Toronto residential neighborhood – mostly semi-detached single family homes and duplexes, the dojo and an old brick industrial building next door. Lots of old garbage alleys and parked cars.

3) We’re getting ready for bed when we hear commotion in the intersection: screech of sudden braking, a car horn, some yelling. I look out the second floor window to see a man lying spread-eagled on the hood of a car, which is stopped in the middle of the intersection.

4) Given that I sleep au natural – I am naked. I instruct my wife to call EMS and report that a pedestrian has been struck by a car – send police and an ambulance. I open the window to report to the players that we have called 9-1-1 and that help is on the way.

5) I quickly throw on a pair of jeans, a shirt, my work-boots and I grab my coat as I race down-stairs to administer first-aid while we wait for help to arrive.

6) I get down stairs barely managing to fasten my jeans. My shirt is un-tucked and un-buttoned, I am holding my coat in my left hand half thinking I will get the patient in to the recovery position and use it to keep him warm as I survey him and treat him for shock.

7) I’m out the door which locks automatically behind me. Sudden mental note – my keys are on my bedside table, hope my wife re-opens the upstairs window so I can communicate with her.I’m about 20’ from the scene. I repeat that I have called the police and an ambulance – I call out my name and explain that I have had first-aid training and that I am coming to help.

Before I can ask whether the victim wants my help (a legal requirement) the whole world turns upside down.

The situation is not at all what it appeared to be. In fact the fellow lying on the car was not hit – he was harassing the driver and the last thing he wanted to hear was that a little twerp like me had called the police!

1) He gets off the hood of the car and begins toward me in a very menacing fashion. It is clear to me that his intentions are evil.

2) He is a little under-dressed for the weather so I can see his muscles – I’m 5’-6 about 145 lbs. This guy is huge! Must be 6’-3”, all muscle – probably 220 lbs fit and athletic with a dark, pock-marked complexion and relatively short, but greasy-looking dark hair. Mean, nasty, intense expression.

3) I’m half clad, cold; my boots are practically falling off my feet because, in my haste to get out here to help this guy, I failed to lace them up! The driver of the car has very wisely locked himself in and is staying put.

This is a true story and I’ll happily tell how it turned out. But, in the exploratory spirit of Van’s forum: I’m curious about what experienced TMAs and professionals might do in this situation. And what they might expect to happen. :?:

I ask in all humility - I've always wondered whether I did the right thing -- or is the right thing only measured by the outcome?? :?: :?:

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:49 pm

Interesting dilemma.

We need to start with environment analysis _then situation analysis and next with goals, i.e., what did you have in mind to do/accomplish _ once you became the object of the man’s attention.

Let’s see: Late at night_ just about freezing temperature_ isolation due to sparse traffic and no people _ garbage alleys galore _ low illumination.

Barely dressed for action _ coat in your hands _ police on the way_ 20 feet out of your front door locked behind you preventing escape back into the safety of your dwelling.

You are cold, your boots falling off your feet, your mobility with the boots very limited. Could you have slipped off your boots easily so as to run barefoot? Are you a fast runner?

A huge, powerful, nasty, enraged opponent, coming at you in a frazzled state of mind?

What went through your mind at that point? You could not outrun him, outfight him, appease him _reach him with words.

If you spoke to him would he have registered what you might have said? Would he have heard your words?

How far was he from you when he first came at you_ and how far were you from parked cars _ what kind of cars and any space between the cars?

How far from the garbage alleys?

Were you familiar with the garbage alleys?

Any improvised weapons anywhere in sight or in the alleys?

Any thoughts on 'second crime scenes'?

Did you have any fighting/engagement on your mind or just escape/survival at any cost?

Were you looking to just ‘buy some precious time’ before the police arrived?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:56 pm

Shane Kirk »

Great post Chris,

I live in very close proximity to a poorly designed intersection, the area is often used as a scenic drive for motorist who enjoy spending the afternoon traveling along side a historic treasure, recognized at home and abroad, as a unique system of natural lakes and rivers connected by man-made locks, canal cuts and inclined planes, a waterway, bounded by a greenbelt, spanning the Province from Halifax Harbour to the Cobequid Bay - linking community’s enroute. Used by the native Mi'kmaq for centuries, the Shubenacadie waterway was carved out of bedrock by glaciers during the last ice age.

The summer months bring both motorist who are observing nature and a racing enthusiast alike due to the tight twist and turns….often a deadly combination.

I have some advanced medical training and at least once or twice a year I find myself as a first responder to these accident scenes due primarily to my proximity…

We teach that; no job is so important and no service is so urgent that we cannot perform it safely.

Through our willingness to be helpful and certain obligations through our basic first aid training we find ourselves often committing to situations before doing even the most basic information gathering (analysis of situation or environment).

As in your situation Chris, often overlooking our personal safety and self-preservation in an effort to aid others in need. I found myself in a similar situation while vacationing with my family in Florida, away from my comfort zone, without the tools required…a lesson never to be repeated.

Why do we forgo personal safety when attempting to deliver aid to others?? How do we arrive at the mindset to rush in… often unprepared for what we will face?? I am sure this could be another discussion that would be very insightful for the readers.

…No job is so important and no service is so urgent that we cannot perform it safely..

Back to our intersection here at home; as I leave my front door to offer help, often in the evening as it relates to most accidents at our intersection, I have my 5 C – cell Maglite (approx 17” in length and approx 2” in diameter). I never leave home without my Streamlight – Scorpion and a tactical knife I can justify as tools of the trade and carry without concern of consequences and of course appropriate foot wear, usually light duty work boots and always laced.

It is somewhat easy to weigh in after the fact and of course from the comfort of our home, in front of our computer screen with how we would approach the situation resulting in a worse, better or different approach and or possible outcome….

I like your post Chris because your intentions were to help when you could have closed your window, turned up the T.V. and pretended nothing was going on in the real world outside your apartment from the second floor. I look forward to reading the outcome of your situation…

When I read your post, what jumped off the page for me was…

“I’m living with my then wife and infant daughter in the apartment above the Dojo, Cold Mountain, located on the north east corner of Logan and Simpson in Toronto”.

For me personally, my thought process changed that incredible evening….as I held my beautiful baby girl for the first time, something inside me changed…I felt it….I have not made a decision since without thinking how that decision will effect my family…I think I always thought from a tactical advantage to some degree…later in life employment would better train me for better tactical thinking…and my own personal journey as related to my training continues to better prepare me…I hope…


I would like to think I would slow down, assess and arrive at a plan of action that enables me to offer assistance (volunteer) and recognize my role as a volunteer focussing on my own personal safety. Calling emergency services would be the starting spot.

Environmental and situational assessment from the protections of my second floor apartment may have been an indicator the situation was not as it seemed and may require a different intervention or possible a second call to emergency services better preparing the responding officers…

It is always difficult to say how one would respond from our vantage point here at home, safe reading the posts with no threat other than that of being judged by our peers.

Recently I responded to what appeared to be a single car accident a hundred feet from my home at four a.m., in my S.U.V. (I choose to drive to the scene – tactically and for safety reasons and additional lighting).

As it turns out the vehicle was stolen and occupied by four youth compounded by the fact a second vehicle was following and recording the act. What appeared to be a accidental single car crash was in fact a stolen vehicle deliberately rammed into another larger parked truck, the result was an explosion moments later…

four youth scrambling to the support vehicle occupied with an additional two youth…now totalling six young men… with no regards for the law, personally safety (theirs or the greater community) and an interest in the only witness (me)…as luck would have it they bailed with some gestures…

the crime scene would be managed for the next several hours by emergency fire personnel, police and chemical clean up team, recovery teams for the vehicles, insurance personnel… I have not looked but the police suggested the taped incident will likely make it’s way to youtube…

it would seem the course of destruction involved hitting most of the trash left for the city to pick up for several miles and often from on side of the road to the other….several parked cars hit along the way....Luckily no one was hurt....

The fire destroyed any evidence.

Not sure if my ramblings add anything but I enjoyed the post and thought I would weigh in….

I can’t wait to hear the rest of the story Chris….

Good Cheers,

Shane.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:58 pm

Chris McKaskell »

I agree -- That's a tough one: I mean, I have first aid training and I feel very strongly that we all have a responsibility, as members of a peaceful society, to help those in need of help -- I really hate violent stories where good samaritans become victims.

First rule of first aid is SURVEY THE SCENE FOR DANGER. I thought I had done that - ooops, obviously not.

Were there signals of danger that I missed from my window? Guess I should have established verbal comunication with the players on the street before engaging, but in a medical emergency seconds count and can mean the difference between life and death.

I should mention that there was broken glass on the ground - making barefoot running or fighting a little undesireable.

I should also mention that he probably started about 20' from me - and closed in at a moderate pace - more like stalking toward me, certainly not running, nor taking his time.

Not a lot of time to think.

And a heck of a thing to need to change gears that fast!
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 8:00 pm

Chris McKaskell »

Woops, Hi Shane, thanks for playing -- I just caught your post -- we must have sent them at the same time.

…No job is so important and no service is so urgent that we cannot perform it safely..


Yeah!!!

What have I learned with time?? prepare myself before going out! Tie the boots, put on the coat, grab the medical kit, a blanket, my flashlight (I have the same one, Shane).

I'm a cabinet maker and am in the habit of always carrying a knife in case I need to cut something - which is surprisingly often.

Yours was a great story -- very smart to bring your vehicle.

And yeah - kids change almost everything.

So it sounds to me like you would have entered the fray a little more prepared than I did.

But what would you have done once this monster started stalking toward you? Would you be thinking fight or flight?

Would you have started down the new path by trying to communicate first?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 8:04 pm

Shane Kirk »

But what would you have done once this monster started stalking toward you? Would you be thinking fight or flight?
Would you have started down the new path by trying to communicate first?


You suggest this is a residential area, mostly semi-detached single-family homes and duplexes.

Are there any others who are aware of the situation that you can observe from your vantage point, anyone who may lend some assistance? Are you familiar with any neighbors whom you may be able to seek safe refuge?

You suggest this immediate area has lots of old garbage alleys and parked cars…I am with Van, an environment analysis is desperately in order and presumable you have the advantage here, as this is your neighbourhood.

With the information available my thoughts are attempt some type of communication, attempting to verbally de-escalate the situation. I would be attempting to creating distance with my obvious familiarity of the surroundings.

I would think I would be attempting to source additional resources from within the community; bringing attention from fellow residents through yelling or throwing typical debris found on the street at the neighbours door/window…all the time trying to keep distance using the physical surroundings.

I would think the intended victim (safe in the car) could be helpful if I could communicate to him to start blowing his horn….the more witnesses the less likely he may be to engage in assaulting behaviour.

In short I would try to buy some time, assess my attacker, look for weapons that may be helpful if we engage in combat. I am also assessing my opponent’s physical condition, mobility, general strengths and weaknesses that are less obvious than his muscular build and large stature.

All this is based on his degree of intent to cause harm…if he is serious about taking me out and I am confident I have no safe exit strategy, hopefully my brief game of cat and mouse has educated me regarding some vulnerability demonstrated while attempting catch me around the cars…if I have not secured an improvised weapon that I am confident will help in this situation and the police have yet to arrive…..

I am left with one choice…attack the attack with extreme prejudice. I could not tell you what that attack might look like, as I do not have the information needed regarding my opponent, information I would have collected while studying him at the scene, observing his body position, movements, agility, coordination.

I have the extreme fortune and privilege of being a student of Sensei Maloney, one thing I have learned: “train hard – win easy”. Joe Pomfret has this statement on the back of his Reality Self – Defence club T – Shirts, Joe was kind enough to leave a few during his last visit and week long seminar.

If my last line of defence is to attack, it is going to be calculated, pre-emptive, extremely violent and extremely hard!!

I hope your intimate involvement in the situation, experiencing it as it evolved with your familiarity of the surroundings had a more positive outcome.

Shane.
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