Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 26, 2019 8:04 am

• The arms. There are many targets in the arms. Without weapons, striking these targets is unlikely to cause anyone to die. Still, strikes to them will generally make attackers change their mind about what they had planned for the evening. So strikes to the arms and wrists are popular self-defense techniques. The following are some high value targets on the arms.

• The subaxillary bundle. The subaxillary bundle is a group of nerves located about an inch down from the armpit on the inside of your arm. Knuckle strikes to the subaxillary bundle cause the arm to go numb for several minutes. However, knife thrusts to the same region are frequently fatal. The reason is that they sever the brachial artery, which is located under this bundle. The acupressure point is called Heart 2.

• The superficial branch of the radial nerve. The radial nerve runs near the top of your arm just below the muscular bulge on your forearm. Bruising this nerve makes it hard for your opponent to hold a weapon or make a fist. The corresponding acupressure point called is Triple Warmer 8. Treatment includes icing and massage.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:18 pm

• The median nerve. The median nerve runs down the center of the forearm. Nausea results from single-knuckle strikes made about one-and-a-half inches above the wrist flexure. The acupressure point is Pericardium 6. Treatment involves icing and massage.

• Wrist. The ulnar nerve is located on the little finger side of your forearm. The vulnerable point is located about an inch up from the wrist, and is often attacked using wrist-locks. The accupressure point is called Heart 5.

The radial nerve is located on the thumb side of the forearm. Its vulnerable point is also located about an inch up from the wrist, and is also attacked using wrist-locks. This second point is called Lung 8. Treatment involves rest and icing.

• Back of the hands. There are many small bones, tendons, ligaments, and nerves in the hands. All are painfully attacked with knuckles or tools. The best target is in the middle of the hand between the middle and ring fingers. Treatment involves icing and reconstructive surgery.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:21 pm

• Collar bones. Powerful downward blows can break the collar bones. This keeps the arms from working, and can cause death by sending bone fragments into the heart or lungs.

Personal first aid for broken collar bones involves raising the hand on the side that is broken lapel-high, then holding it there.

First aid for someone else involves splinting his arms at his sides using a roller bandage tied over his shoulders and under his armpits in a figure-eight. Very heavy padding will be required in the armpits to keep the bandage from cutting off circulation to the back muscles, thereby causing permanent crippling.

• Jaw. Knuckles break on jaws and teeth. So you shouldn't use your fists to punch people in the mouth.

However, jaws can be broken by elbow strikes, particularly if you use your other hand or a wall to keep your victim's head from moving.

First aid for broken jaws involves checking the victim's throat for broken teeth and other debris, then placing a bandage over the point of his chin and knotting it at the top of his head. Jaws must not be bandaged if the victim has a broken nose.

Otherwise he may suffocate.

Caution must also be exercised when splinting broken jaws, as it may cause the victim to strangle on his tongue.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:24 pm

• Point of the chin. Knuckles break on chins, too. However, the heel of your palm doesn't. Upward blows with the heel of the palm to the point of the chin sever tongues and break teeth, while exceptionally powerful blows cause brain concussion and whiplash.

The target is located just below where Kirk Douglas has his famous dimple. The corresponding acupressure point is Conceptor Vessel 23.

First aid involves collecting any broken teeth or portions of tongues and putting them on ice, then sending for an aid car.

• Upper lip. The best target on the upper lip is located immediately below the septum. (This is the fleshy piece separating the nostrils.) The targets are a bone joint known as the intermaxillary suture and a major facial nerve known as the nasopalatine nerve.

Light blows to this target split lips, medium blows break teeth and cause concussion, and heavy blows break the bones that hold the skull on top of the spinal column. Treatment for the normal range of injuries includes ice packs, sutures, and reconstructive dentistry. The acupressure point is called Governing Vessel 26.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:25 pm

• Nose. Nasal injuries cause heavy bleeding, uncontrollable eye-watering, and intense pain. Inserting the fingers into the nostrils also makes opponents pull away, and is generally a more-effective self-defense technique than trying to gouge his eyes.

Nosebleeds are stopped by squeezing the nostrils together. On the other hand, broken noses and damaged sinuses require ice packs and rest. Always check unconscious victims for broken noses, as you don't want them to drown in their own blood.

• Eyes. While finger strikes to the eyes cause great pain and terror, serious eye injuries rarely result from them. The reason is that everyone instinctively jerks away from attacks to their eyes. So you should direct eye-level attacks to the following targets instead.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:26 pm

• The supraorbital arteries. These small arteries run through little notches located on the inside center of your eyebrows. When cut, they cause much bleeding, which in turn scares people and obscures their vision. The acupressure point is Gall Bladder 14.

• The lachrymal glands. The lachrymal, or tear, glands are located under the little notches at the outside corners of your eyes. Hitting these glands from the rear disrupts the inner ear, and causes general discomfort and nausea. The acupressure point is Gall Bladder 1.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:28 pm

• The glabella. The glabella is located between the eyebrows, perhaps half-an-inch above the bridge of the nose. Heavy blows to the glabella damage the sinuses and frontal lobes, and cause concussion, unconsciousness, or death. In yoga, this point is known as the Third Eye, while in acupressure, it is known as Governing Vessel 6.

• Ears. Slapping the ears with cupped hands ruptures the victim's ear drums. This causes the victim to suffer hearing loss, light-headedness, and balance problems until his eardrums heal. The external part of the ear also can be bitten or twisted, and bleeds profusely. Treatment generally requires rest and surgery.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Dec 04, 2019 6:15 am

Courtesy of our friend Darren Laur

COMBATIVE ASSESSMENT:

In any hostile encounter it is always important to tactically assess the situation in which you find yourself in. Through a quick and proper assessment, you are more likely to choose a reasonable and appropriate Tactical Response Option.

Given time, distance and opportunity, there will be two basic categories of combative assessment that should be assessed and analyzed which are:


1. Threat Assessment, and
2. Environmental Assessment


THREAT ASSESSMENT:

To me, threat assessment means assessing the threat directly in front of you, usually your attacker(s). It is important that prior to a physical attack, you obtain as much information about this threat as possible, such as:

. Intent
• Size and body type
• Skills or perceived skills
• Number of attackers
• Weapons
• Pre-assaultive signs (Ritualized Combat)
• Mental state
• Range and positioning

All the above, plus many more, will assist you in making an appropriate tactical response. (Readers may want to read my earlier post on Tactical Response Options for more details)


ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT:

It is also important in a hostile encounter that you assess the environment (surroundings) around you. Your immediate surroundings include:

• Your house
• Your car
• A nightclub
• A bus
• A store
• Your office

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Dec 04, 2019 6:18 am

No matter what environment you find yourself in, you want to assess the following:

ESCAPE ROUTES:

Remember that self-protection is about "winning" and "survival." There is nothing wrong with escaping from the situation, if possible and reasonable, if and when the s**t hits the fan.

Escape routs are just that, exits to escape to in order to remove yourself from a dangerous situation. Some escape routs include:

• Cars
• Buses
• Windows
• Doors
• Stores and businesses
• Stairs
• Bushes
• Walls
• Fences
• Escalators
• Traffic

For those who have never practiced going through, over, or under the above noted obstacles, you should and must.

Proper pre planning prevents piss poor performance. Whatever escape route chosen, obviously be careful not to get your self cornered or trapped.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Dec 04, 2019 6:32 am

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/blog/t ... f-defense/

A must read.

Lots and Lots of Money

But until trial, the criminal justice system overwhelmingly takes the position that a person who kills another is the suspect in a murder, and that the person who died is the victim of that murder. What led up to the death is many times up for debate, and if you are going to be on the winning side of that debate, you will need to spend some money. LOTS OF MONEY.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:34 pm

Where your skills are...

The goal in any weapons defense program that has any connection to reality is to exit the situation as soon as possible. In many cases, those who claim to teach edged weapon defense pay lip service to avoidance and escape and then spend an inordinate amount of time showing intricate (and highly inappropriate) disarms and counters.

In the Red Zone program escape is not an afterthought, it is the entire focus. This means that all of our techniques and training methods revolve around creating a window of escape at the earliest opportunity.


The positions can be transitioned through to deal with the rapidly evolving situation much in the same way Brazilian Jiu Jitsu utilizes positional control in order to strike and submit. Once a control position has be achieved, we can work to attack the attacker and end the confrontation.
Red Zone
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Dec 18, 2019 6:16 am

I am really enjoying reading the blog of Al Ridenhour ... a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the US Marine Corps...you will too...he presents combative subjects and concepts, in truly outstanding ways.


CEO, Creator Warrior Flow™

Al Ridenhour is a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the US Marine Corps with 28-years of service active and reserve with multiple combat tours to Iraq and Afghanistan. He has also served as a Law Enforcement consultant to the NJ State Police Special Operations Section, NJ Transit Police Operations Section, The NJ Regional Operations and Intelligence Center, the FBI Philadelphia Bomb Section, and subject matter expert to the US Department of Homeland Security's, Explosives Division.

With nearly 40-years of Combative Arts experience, he is recognized as a self-defense expert worldwide and is highly sought out for seminars, workshops, lectures, and special individualized training.

He is the author of "Warrior Flow Mind" (2019), Co-Author of "Attack Proof: The Ultimate Guided in Personal Protection (Human Kinetics, 2010) and the Co-Author of "How to Fight for Your Life" (June 2010).

For more go to https://protectyourself.mykajabi.com/
Follow on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/WarriorFlowCom ... _todo_tour
LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/warrio ... ember=true


Start reading....https://protectyourself.mykajabi.com/bl ... g-part-iii

Of particular interest to me is the following since I keep telling my students that in most cases success in a confrontation has all to do with the 'chosen' opponent by fate for you at that moment in time and not necessarily your presupposed skills.
In this installment, I'm going to focus more on drawing some distinctions and helping you to understand the difference of our focus within Warrior Flow.

You see for us the fight is not in a class, that's the place where we hone our skills for the potential of a real battle. But outside of the class in the world.

We focus to the best of our abilities to deal with likely threats and situations and not on crazy unrealistic hypothetical combat with the one in a million chance of getting into a confrontation with Hafþór Júlíus Björnsson who played The Mountain on Game of Thrones.

Folks I'm sorry but if you can't sense a guy that size in your space you have a "serious" awareness problem.

Moreover, he's probably the least likely person and the few people like him on earth that you have to worry about.

You need to be more attuned to the type of people that populate our prisons that fall in the normal range of physical body types that walk our streets.


One quick note here: I have for a while been shifting my gym workouts to strength training, in particular, dead lifts and squats.

This has brought me in contact with people who come in several times a week and perform some incredible dead lifts, like in 400/500 lb range, with one guy who does an incredible 750 lb dead lift.

It now becomes easier in visualizing what some guy stepping out of his pick up truck you cut off might look like or be like in raw power...skills notwithstanding.

https://youtu.be/e_emh8Hu4-M

you come up against a guy like this...he can lift you right up and throw you over his truck while you take a sanchin stance.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Dec 18, 2019 7:02 am

Best Breathing Techniques to Use During a Deadlift Workout
Like all forms of exercise, breathing provides a crucial role in a person's ability and performance.

To achieve the best deadlift results, use deep breaths taken from the stomach, not the chest. This helps brace the torso by delivering more intraabdominal pressure to support the spine.

Hold the breath throughout the lift, and then exhale, if needed, at the top of the lift, or when the bar is back on the ground between repetitions.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Dec 18, 2019 2:18 pm

Al Ridenhour
Something that has always puzzled me about what I call the "Fight Club" mentality in the martial arts is this notion that it's all about as I've alluded to whose kung fu is best? Who is the biggest badass? Who is the king of the hill in their respective schools? etc...

This is bullshit...

The enemy is not in your school...

He's the guy who stands between you and your family, he's the guy accosting you on your way to your car, your home, to the corner store, from work. He's the guy who harasses your daughter, your wife, your young son.

The truth though is that the vast majority of martial artists "by far" are law-abiding citizens. The vast majority are decent hard-working people. We are generally the kind of people who were drawn to the martial arts by a desire to be able to protect ourselves and our loved ones should the need arise to have to stand in that space and be that person who can bring it and kick that ass.

Whereas the vast majority of criminals are the kinds of people that let's just say if you were going to have tea with the Queen, they're probably not on your list of invited guests. Folks, most people who are criminals are, to put it bluntly, ##### up as people.

Say what you want but the truth is many of the stereotypes about criminals are rooted in more truth than people think. So the issue is are you going to make yourself an easy mark or a hard target?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Dec 18, 2019 2:27 pm

Something that has always puzzled me about what I call the "Fight Club" mentality in the martial arts is this notion that it's all about as I've alluded to whose kung fu is best? Who is the biggest badass? Who is the king of the hill in their respective schools? etc...

This is bullshit...

The enemy is not in your school...
Ridenhour

This is a particular problem we have seen over the years in just about every dojo/every organizations...

The guy who wants to be top monkey of the hill...by showing you how tough he is in the dojo/beating up on 'lesser' students...strutting everywhere he goes...

But as Ridenhour writes...the enemy is not in your school...he is out there in the street and he couldn't care less who you study under or 'how conditioned' you might be...

Likr the tournament champion martial artist, who got jumped in the darkened stairs of the building by the Jamaican Gangbanger who cut off his head.

The real life case I investigated.

The 'tougher' you think you are...the easier it will be to kill you in the street.
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