Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:47 pm

In a common altercation there may be multiple, overt or subliminal reasons to think the tension, or the tipping point of the violence is over or diminishing.

Our inert “alert needle”- the actual level of alertness or “guard” is lowered slightly.

We may not even notice this! In these split seconds citizens, enforcement officers and military units have been suddenly attacked, injured and/or killed at this very "letting guard down" needle point drop.


This is so true and it 'sneaks up on you' leaving you vulnerable.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:51 pm

Hoch

I have been in probably a couple of thousand or so of these disturbances and altercations as a police officer, and just a few in regular life.

Arguments and fights from domestics to car wrecks, road rage, business partners fighting - just a vast variety of people fighting for a vast variety of reasons.

Bouncers and security officers see people tanked up on liquor or drugs and also witness this craziness.


And we all know by the survival textbook, we should stay 100%, Red-hot vigilant while involved in these things, but it may be hard as the human animal that we are, we are constantly reading and reacting to the situation, second-by-second.


There is a rhythm to these things. A beat. A music. And the surprise attack strikes lowers when the "music" lowers, just like a soundtrack at the horror movies. Learn the song.


Inside the battle, Napoleon once remarked said that the most dangerous time on the battlefield was when his troops thought they had just won.

The awareness needle drops. The guard drops. In the Samurai spiritual and practical guide, The Hagakure advises, "after the battle, tighten your helmet strap."

Or in more modern terms we revert to baseball's Casey Stengal and worry when exactly does “the fat lady sing?” In all situations, it ain't over, till its over, over and over.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:58 pm

The "who" is about recognition.

The who you know and the who you don't know. Keep in mind there is simply no way in this essay to cover the various personality types like pan-violent, frustration-aggressive, by-polar, under-controlled persons and over-controlled persons and on and on.

Such is the intense study found in psychology and sociology doctoral programs spanning decades.

This essay is about the initial recognition of danger and initial response, survival skills, just a working knowledge of who you might encounter is an achievable lesson.



The success of martial arts techniques is all related to the type of opponent you will fight. This a truth that is 'painful' as Rory pointed out in his books...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:02 pm

To wit-

Hock
The Positions- The Actual Precise Position
If the situation is a mugging?

Then the positional concerns are thing like “where does the mugger stand? What hand does he grab you with?

Is his knife tip at your rib or at your throat? Small things. The Devil in the details.

D-Day Analogy- “When you thrust the bayonet into him. Twist it like this!”


This is the last level of training, the smallest, most personal, close aspects of a fight. Expertise knowledge.

This is the very "pinpoint" right down to it.

The general tactics may well work, but now where exactly and precisely are you and the opponent?

This is the real fine tuning of tactics as needed. The finite situation. Like - you are on the bottom-side of a ground fight and his left leg is out posted outward.

An arm Wrap trap or your knife hand/arm warp trap of his empty hand. His left hand is on your throat and you are up against a wall.

The sniper is in a window and you must cross an alley. You must draw a pistol from your holster with a wounded arm.

Things such as exact position of the enemy, his arms, legs, hips, head, his weapon grip - may actually dictate life or death!

Sometimes, solutions relate to finite positioning. You could die because his elbow was low instead of high, or his hip was canted right instead of left.

The more time you have to study? The more you can learn about the finite. When possible, the properly trained army reaches this high level of training.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:07 pm

Hoch

Who are the most violent criminals?

I am a graduate of a criminal profiling police school offered by the State of Texas, taught by both state and federal experts.

In this class they identified the most violent criminal to beware of - a white male, between the ages of 17 to 25 or 28.

There are a few other markers but the markers about things such as their problem childhood are not things you can quickly know or identify in a short term encounter.

You may however learn of these markers though longer-term encounters. The history includes:

- Abuse, torture and sex with small animals

- A physical abnormality you may or may not can easily see

- Trouble with their parents

This generic profile is still true today, but by no means should this be the only profile of a potential violent criminal you should watch for.

Criminals and terrorists come in all shapes, sexes, sizes, colors and religions and their identification is much more situational and about what they are doing and wearing and where they are.

A totality of circumstances is the legal term and exactly who they are, is just a part of the identification process.

In this age of islamic, fanatic and extremism, only a fool would not raise an eyebrow at the 9-11 look-alikes when doing things suspiciously in certain situations.

I would expect no less of similar eyebrow raises against white or black people in certain situations. You must be properly educated beforehand and articulate why your brows raised. Stand by for more on that.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:09 pm

Hoch
Who commits workplace violence? It seems every month some employee or ex-employee shoots up a job-site somewhere in the world.

A profile of this character has also been developed. Unlike the young male profile previously mentioned, these job-site shooters are usually male and over 35, and often have many years of employment at the very place they shoot up.

Usually their work history is spotted with odd troubles.

Forensic psychologists suggest that, “employers and co-workers should watch for changes in these problem-people’s behavior, attendance, productivity, personal hygiene, and social isolation.

Killing sprees usually are the culmination of many years of unresolved personal problems and mismanaged stresses.

Problems with alcohol and drugs, financial worries, and marriage and family pressures often aggravated their problems while coping with this fast-paced society.”

Some of these business shootings involve perceived or real sexual relationships, or break-ups and divorces.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:12 pm

The next probability factor is an ex-boyfriend or husband comes and shoot's the relationship partner's business place up.

Keep an ear open to employees and co-workers in break-ups and really heated divorces. The danger zone includes the business parking lot.


I have investigated a few of these very cases...awful stuff.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:14 pm

Drugs, Alcohol and the Toll? A nationwide USA Today Poll conducted in July, 2006 stated that 1 in 5 people, or some 40 million adults have been addicted to drugs or alcohol at some point in their lives.

Many other users who are not addicted are responsible for all kinds of negative incidents.

This effects everyone and the recklessness, loss of control and desperation increases crime and accidents in all categories.

This means that 1 in 5 people can cause of lot trouble, but so can the occasional users. When considering who to avoid? This would be a major category.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:18 pm

And now when you are done with your classes, seminars and 'rank' think of this...because this what counts in keeping you alive.

Hoch

Who am I? Really! Take a realistic inventory:


* am I trained to recognize violent
encounters before and while they happen?

* am I trained in vocal, de-escalation skills?

* am I in shape to fight for several
non-stop minutes or more?

* am I in shape to run far enough away?

* am I trained to fight properly?

* do I have or need weapons?
Can I fight against weapons?



You will find that realistically, we trained martial artists fall short on these basic components...and any false self confidence or 'strutting' will get us killed.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:19 pm

Bruise Lee »

Excellent thread
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:06 am

HYDRATE OR DIE


HYDRATE OR DIE!!

Remember the old Camelback slogan? We are entering into the warmer months of the year and with that the risk of heat casualties is higher. There are some things you can do as a trainer and if you are student about to conduct summer training.

The first thing is to get accustomed to the heat. You won’t do well if you spend your entire day in air conditioned bliss and then expect to be at your best spending the entire weekend in the sun.

Usually beginning this month, I will exercise and train during the full heat of the day just to get used to it. I will hydrate very well the night before and that morning and then spend an hour or more either running or conducting weapons training.

Make sure that you maintain proper hydration at least one week before the event. In truth it will not hurt you to do this all the time. Fluid balance in achieved by:

1. Water intake because you feel thirsty
2. Water loss via the kidneys and urine.

Under normal conditions, average adult fluid replacement is 2-3 liters per day.

With prolonged exertion, you can lose almost 2 liters per hour by sweating alone. A good rule of thumb is to load your stomach when you load your magazines. But guys forget. Now add heat and sun and you begin to create a situation that may lead to you going down from the heat.

Proper fluid replacement:

1 quart of fluid should be drunk 2 hours before arriving at the range. Cold water is an ideal fluid replacement. It is tempting to down a quart of some sports drink or a soda. No! Water….drink water. If it doesn’t taste good to you, too bad. Drink it.

Avoid alcohol. A beer or two with dinner won’t hurt you IF you accompany it with water. A case or a keg is not a good idea.

Caffeine. I am a coffee drinker. But I am careful to not overdo it in the heat of summer. A couple of cups maximum and again…accompanied with water.

Wilderness Survival authority Tony Nester advises to keep the water in your stomach not in the bottle. Downing (10 ounces or more) is better than sipping, during the activity, by moving it through your stomach faster.

Stay hydrated, avoid having to play catch up. Don’t allow yourself to get thirsty. Yes, you will be pissing quite a bit.

That is a good thing. We jokingly call urination during training breaks “hydration checks”. If you are well hydrated your urine will tend to be clear. If you don’t see that, go drink some water.

If you begin to feel a headache, or that your words seem a little slurred, you are beginning to fall victim to the heat.

Get in the shade, down some water and pour some water over your head and face to cool off. It may not be a bad idea to bring a hadji rag (shemagh) or a towel from the hotel to dip in the ice chest water and keep wrapped around your neck.

Same thing with the hat, which you should keep on your head all day long. Dip it routinely in water and keep your head cool.

These are all simple precautions you should take.

Remember, you took time off work, bought ammo, traveled to the site, and paid for the training. What a waste if we have to take you back to the hotel room to sit in the AC because you didn’t feel like drinking water.


Gabe Suarez
Suarez International USA, Inc.
One Source Tactical
info@suarezinternational.com
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:10 am

Road Warriors

About 15 years ago my wife’s parents were visiting us from South Korea. At that time, we lived in California and we spent a few weeks showing them the sights, from LA to Las Vegas, and most of Northern California. One of the trips we took was to Yosemite to camp for a few days.

The drive from the central valley to Yosemite was very beautiful, and the last part of the trip involved a very nice two-lane road cut into the side of the hills overlooking a river. On one side of the road was a drop-off of at least 50 feet to the river, and the other side had almost no shoulder.

As a habit, I packed my 9mm Browning Hi-Power in the van along with all of our camping gear. I always took it when traveling or camping with the family. I had read too many stories of bad things that happened to people while away from home, and I just felt that the added insurance of a pistol would help me defend my family.

The Browning was stored in a cabinet in the van, just behind my seat.

Most of the drive was uneventful, if you can call traveling with a wife, three children below the age of 8, and the in-laws uneventful. The weather was near perfect and all seemed right with the world.

I had always been observant wherever I went, mostly due to the fact that I had been a Reserve Army Infantry captain for about 7 years at that time. We did considerable training that consisted of moving, reporting and so on, and that gave me the habit of looking around and being aware of my surroundings.

We were on the narrow two-lane road and we had not seen any other cars for a long time. But, it was a weekday so it did not seem too unusual. In my rearview mirror I saw two cars coming up fast.

Both were older vehicles, and as they got closer I could see that the first one had four guys in it and the second one had three. They were obviously traveling together and in no time they were on my bumper. There were a few places to pass but neither car tried to pass me.

From my rear view mirror, it looked like the occupants were spending too much time checking out who was in our van. They could see in the big back windows of our conversion van, and they could see my in-laws. The first car then decided to pass, but it pulled alongside of us.

It slowed and matched our speed. The guys inside spent several seconds looking through our side windows. It seemed to me that they were trying to see who was inside to assess the risk involved in stopping us, for who knows what purpose.

It was like a simple math problem; they were trying to decide if we were going to be an easy score. I knew immediately they intended to do us harm.

As the first car passed us, I stared into their vehicle to let them know I was on to them. Surprise is a weapon, and I was not going to let them think this was going to be easy.

At the same time, I asked my wife in a very pleasant, non-concerned voice, “Honey, could you reach behind me and hand me my pistol?” I did not want to alarm her or anyone else.

Of course, she just looked at me and asked me, “Why?” I smiled again and just told her it did not matter why, just hand me the pistol. She did, but she was obviously curious as to why. As soon as I had the Browning in my lap, I felt much better.

By this time, the first car had sped around a corner, out of sight. The second car stayed glued to my bumper. So, let’s see, the odds are seven to one, but the Browning had 14 shots.

I realized that I had to do something fast to signal that I knew exactly what was going on so I slowed to about 20 miles per hour. The second car still did not pass. As we came around the next corner, the first car had stopped in the middle of the road, some 200 feet in front of us.

To say I was worried would be a vast understatement. My plan was to have everyone drop to the floor of the van while I engaged the nearest threat. If I could get a few of them before they knew what hit them, the rest might run away. To reduce the odds, I suddenly stopped the car in the lane I was in, as far to the right as possible.

The van was a weapon I planned on using before the Browning. The car behind us stopped, and I could see a loud animated discussion going on inside between the three in that car. The front car sat where it was, not moving. After what seemed like hours, but I am sure it was seconds, the car behind us peeled out and passed us.

The Browning was in my hand just below the window, and I was ready in case they stopped. But, they kept going and met up with the car in front. After a few seconds of what appeared to be another heated discussion, both cars took off.

My wife, in-laws, and children were oblivious to what had just taken place. They did ask why we stopped and I just said that I let a car pass us that was in a bigger hurry. The rest of the trip was fine, but as we came to each corner, I would slow down to make sure our friends were not waiting for us.

Later that evening, while all tucked away in the campground, I told my wife what had actually happened. She turned very pale.

It all made sense to her then, and after that, she always insisted I carry a gun with us when we were out. Having the Browning in my hand made all the difference in the world. I knew that I could defend my family. We would not be defenseless victims.

—KS, Wisc.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:18 am

Ambushed in the lobby

Survival lessons from the street, home, anywhere!

In 1968 I was a young lawyer and auxiliary police officer residing in a big city. After an exhaustive application and investigation process, and an 18-month wait, I received my License to Carry Pistol, which in those days was restricted to target shooting only.

Consequently, my choice of firearms was severely limited and I selected a Smith & Wesson M15 Combat Masterpiece .38 caliber revolver with a 4-inch barrel and target sights.

One night I was returning from the shooting range with my wife. I wore the revolver on my strong side and I covered it with a light jacket.

When we entered the lobby of our apartment building, I noticed a rough-looking guy seated on the window box in front of the plate glass window. He had a wooden broom handle cut down to about 4 feet in length with tape wrapped around the top end, which he tapped vigorously on the tile floor.

I ignored him, but kept him in sight, as I urged my wife toward the elevators, which were around a corner to the left. The guy with the stick got up and followed behind and a second guy with a baseball bat appeared in front of my wife and me.

These punks obviously had mayhem in mind and probably thought they had a couple of defenseless victims to whom they could do whatever they wanted.

They had approached to about 10 feet on either side of us when I pushed my wife behind me with my left hand and drew the .38 with my right hand and raised it to the ready position. Before I could utter the word “freeze,” I heard one of them yell, “Holy Sh*t!”

They both dropped their bludgeons and ran for their lives. I re-holstered and calmed my wife, explaining what had happened and that a probable assault, robbery and perhaps worse were thwarted because I was armed.

I held my fire because the threat was over as soon as I displayed my firearm and the use of deadly force was no longer justified.

Furthermore, the location (marble walls and floor and a plate glass window) made the risk of a ricochet from a miss or a through-and-through shot too great.

Had I been forced to fire in self-defense, I would not have hesitated, but I’m thankful that the mere presence of a firearm terminated the situation and I did not have to seriously injure or kill one or both of those morons.
—ASP, Internet
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:25 am

Greeting the I-55 Killers
Written by Combat Handguns December 2007. Author Archive »

Survival lessons from the street, home, anywhere!

I wouldn’t call it beautiful, but it was as pretty as something that functional could be. It was a gleaming black Smith & Wesson M29 with a 4-inch tube and a pair of Herrett’s Jordan Trooper grips in fancy walnut.

We both knew it was not legal to carry it in an unlocked case on the back seat, but for once, we simply didn’t care. That’s because this was way back when the news was filled with the exploits of the gang they had dubbed the “I-55 killers.”

Neither my wife nor I recall exactly when this was, but we were in our Camaro LT so it must have been 1976, 77, or 78.

We were heading down to the area just across the river, and we were just about halfway there when four young men in a dark, four-door auto began looking us over, driving in the next lane just ahead of us, then dropping just behind us, and then racing ahead again.

When they started moving into our lane and slowing, I asked my wife to hand me the Smith, lower her window, and then slide down in her seat.

I can only imagine what it looked like from a car away, but that big-bored black gun sliding out the window of a low-slung black car in a hand shrouded in a driving glove would have made quite an impression.

At any rate it certainly made Christians out of those young men! Their car remained at a nice, constant speed and nestled into the right lane. I slid into the left lane and sped up until I was some distance ahead. And that hand cannon was aimed directly at them the whole way.

Our car then slid back into the right lane as the other auto quickly disappeared over the rear horizon. We only saw it once again. It came back over the horizon, saw that we were back within sight, and disappeared forever.

I’d never know if they were really the so-called I-55 killers, or just a few kids trying to have fun. All I do know is that we finished our trip in perfect health. Thanks, I’m convinced, to that big-bored beauty with the fancy stocks.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:30 am

In my teenage years I used to camp quite regularly. I almost always had my camping gear in my truck on the passenger side of the bench seat. I had my standard gear for camping that consisted of a sleeping bag, canned food, etc… and my favorite fixed blade camp knife.

My friends and I were all hunters and fishermen, and we often held friendly shooting matches with our pellet guns while camping. I had a Crossman pellet revolver that was in my pack as well. Luckily I had all my gear late one night.

While in high school I earned money for my hobbies and saved for college by working at a fast food place in a nearby town. I usually worked late, especially on Friday nights, and this night was no exception.


After finishing my shift for the night at 2:30AM, I decided to take a shortcut on a back road to my parent’s house in the country. While driving home on an uninhabited stretch of road I noticed a car swerving back and forth into the oncoming lane in front of me.

I guessed the driver was drunk. I slowed down and kept my distance. Then suddenly the car turned sideways and blocked the road. A few months earlier, two men were attacked by a group of men who used their car to block the narrow road ahead of them.

The two men were beaten badly but both survived and the “beaters” were arrested, tried, and jailed for their crime so I had nothing to worry about, right? Wrong!


Before I could even think about turning around and avoiding the deep ditches that flanked the road, two men were already charging my truck and worse yet, I had stalled my truck while trying to turn around and get out of there.


It was summer and I had my window down and I never thought to close it. My father had always taught me that if I am attacked and can’t get away, to fight as hard as I can and “get my shots in.”

Easier said than done because one of the men had a bat or some sort of club, I was going to get stomped. For some reason I felt a flood of anger and I was going to fight for my life, I was not going to be beaten to death on the side of the road!

Thinking quickly, I grabbed my knife and pellet gun which was unloaded and would make a good club, both of which were rolled in my sleeping bag strapped to my pack. The larger club wielding man got about five feet from my door when I raised my pellet gun to the man’s head.

Much to my surprise, the man dropped the club, screamed, “He’s got a gun!” turned and ran toward the car he got out, falling to the ground halfway there. The occupants of the car saddled up and took off into the night.


I started the truck, turned around and got out of there quickly. I took the long way home that night. This happened before cell phones worked in that part of the world so I did not call the police, I just went home.

I don’t know what would have happened had I not done what I did. That pellet gun probably saved my life. I did not take that shortcut home for a long time.

—RG, OH
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