Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 6:47 am

The other man

The element of fear and anticipation decreases dramatically with any minute that does not elapse between the awareness that an encounter will inevitably take place, and the actual face-off.

Most antagonistic scenarios that do not involve a Comment of sorts, that occur spontaneously or with minimal premeditation, revolve around factors other than personal fear.

The most important, in my opinion, is the success or failure to immediately grasp and interpretation of the situation in all its consequences.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 6:48 am

Expecting an opponent to behave in one way or the other is not without danger. Often, being right or wrong determines who's going to live or die at the end of an encounter--before the actual fight has begun.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 6:50 am

Seduction of art

"Hitting is not important. Hitting and hurting is."

Dunraj Seth, foundry shop foreman and martial artist at Benares, India

Closed combative systems that condition the use of clearly defined (or even standardized) weaponry in defined, replicable environments also condition the fighter to expect certain maneuvers, and to respond to them within the parameters of the system.

This enables system-immanent growth of complexity and sophistication.

Hergsell warns his readers against "underestimating a naturalist gifted with great physical strength, otherwise it could be the case that the fencer who is accustomed to conventional [regelrechte] attacks will be conquered by the uninhibited attacks, the ruleless application of violence.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 6:52 am

Even the best fencer should never forget that in dangerous situation weaker characters can be driven into a condition of raging courage by the thought of impending annihilation.

(...) History has shown that even experienced tournament fencers, who even had passed several duels victoriously, succumbed to inferior opponents only because they felt secure and superior.

As such a feeling immediately results in a dropping of attentiveness and a simultaneous reduction in combat and mental energy, this may have sinister consequences.

Thus one should never underestimate an opponent, because only few mortals are preordained to reach the heights of ideal perfection.[65]

Clearly, swordplay for artistic purposes and swordplay intended to dispatch an opponent as soon and swiftly as possibly not only have different objectives, but also demand a different mental approach from the fighter.

In life-and-death fights, results were all that counted. This accounts for the importance of the botto secreta through all ages in which combat to the death was a more likely scenario than extended engagement in ritualized Olympic or Olympian environments.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:23 pm

Tonic Immobility


Hoch
Then to add to this mix, specialists had identified yet another biological reason to the freeze before impending danger.

Tonic immobility has also been used to describe the paralysis which often immobilizes animals when they feel threatened by a predator. (this techno-title actually comes from shark studies, then extrapolated to animals and humans. I encourage you to look this up.

It is interesting). Tonic immobility plays a role in survival if it helps a hunted animal to blend in with its surroundings by remaining as motionless as an inanimate object.

It is also a response that may be adaptive in humans when the brain perceives there is no possibility of escaping (borders on hyper-vigilance, huh? and is another expert group's way of describing the syndrome)) or winning a fight.

And, it is used to feign death in hopes of being abandoned by prey, to escape at a strategic point when possible. Many animals carry their fresh kill to a safe place for temporary storage. Playing dead is a biological response and frequently used by mankind on the battlefield.

"...blend in with its surroundings by remaining as motionless as an inanimate object."

In a related topic, consider the freezing aspects taught in Army Basic Training for night tactics. We were instructed several ways to respond to a sudden enemy flare in the sky.

One response was to freeze in place and hope your camouflage was adequate to blend you into the scenery. You froze like a statue because any motion under the lit flare is easy to detect by the enemy in the still surroundings.

Explanations of the biological Tonic Immobility are used to treat victims of crime and war who suffer guilt over their inactions. There is much research on the after-the-fact, "post-end" of the subject and I urge someone really interested in this should research the rehabilitative methods under this title.

This form of freezing has nothing to do with bravery or cowardice, or trying to select a tactic among tactics. "Unfortunately," the below experts conclude," in psychology, this "fright" (tonic immobility) has also been referred to as "freezing." This has created much confusion."
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:26 pm

Always of interest

Studies
and practice have shown that one is stronger for pushing, pulling, striking,
jumping, etc., when breathing out, especially if the breath can be
controlled to assist in the timing of an event.



It is postulated
that contraction of abdominal muscles suppresses the sympathetic
nervous system, having the result of reducing common reactions to
stress and fear (increased heart rate and blood pressure), allowing
some measure of control over emotional reactions.


The autonomic
nerve center of the solar plexus is also affected by abdominal breathing.

This network controls the digestive processes and waste removal
mechanisms of the liver and kidneys by controlling the circulatory
ability of small blood vessels and capillaries.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:27 pm

There are many different ways of breathing, depending on the position
and activity of the body. In martial arts, as in zazen breathing, the
emphasis is on the abdominal exhalation, yet the pattern of breaths
will vary.

Particularly in the more vigorous phases of training the intake
and expiration of air can be fast or slow, silent or noisy, with tension
or relaxation, depending on the requirement of the technique and the
task at hand.


What is important is the voluntary control of the breathing
at the center of the movement, rather than the breathing response
limiting what the body and the mind want to do.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:29 pm

This is not to say that
technique should not flow from the breathing, as this is a fundamental
of graceful, strong movement in any activity.


But the martial artist trains
to strike a balance between the physiological demands of the organism
and the intention of the spirit and mind, to best utilize the body’s energy
and dynamic resources to achieve its goal.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:30 pm

As we naturally emit a grunt or groan when lifting a heavy object, in
the same way a martial artist will focus the exhalation of air with a
vocal sound into a kiai.

The word itself means union of spirit energy,
from the Japanese for ki (energy) and ai (union), and therefore represents
more than the mere physical manifestation of a shout.


For the
martial artist in action the term “spirit yell” best describes the source
and meaning of the kiai.


It is the outward expression and extension of
one’s internal energy in union with the body and its external surroundings.

depending on the task or flow of the moment, such as pulling, pushing,
entering, and turning.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:32 pm

A sharp exhalation is used by martial
artists to accompany short percussive strikes, blows, or blocks.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:33 pm

Sanchin breathing practice, most often associated with the goju-ryu
and uechi-ryu styles of Okinawan karate-do (originally from the pangai-
noon style of Chinese kempo and thought by some to be
the original lessons given by Bodhidharma to the Shaolin
monks) is used for developing pushing and pulling technique.


The air and energy is mustered up in the hara and then expelled
slowly and gutturally with a slight closure of the soft
palate at the back of the throat to control the flow of air.

It
develops great power and emphasizes rootedness and sturdiness,
with energy flowing upward from the ground like a
tree standing in a storm.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:35 pm

The moving tension of the arms
and legs forms an isometric pressure zone around the abdominal
cavity
, allowing the strengthening of the entire body,
and developing the use of this strength in a very controlled
manner.


In striking and grappling techniques, students are often
taught to visualize energy “flowing like water through a hose”
in conjunction with their exhalation of air, or to “breathe
through their hands.”

Breathing exercises, focus on abdominal
contraction and the controlled exhalation of the breath
during the performance of techniques is central to the daily
training in the martial arts.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:37 pm

• Early in their training martial artists learn to inhale and exhale in such
a way that maximum gas exchange can take place at the cellular level.

Greater control over the mechanism of breathing can benefit
technique, timing, and the overall health and strength of the body.

Emphasis is placed on the exhalation phase of breathing.

This promotes
the full emptying of the lungs of waste by-products and also
prolongs the time that the body is in the exhalation mode.


• Martial artists work to control their breathing and expand the capacity
of the lungs by strengthening and localizing the response of the
diaphragm muscle.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:38 pm

Seth Rosenblatt »

van, have you had any success applying this breathing to non-martial arts, but still aerobic activities?

for example, i bike about 14 miles a day. when i'm going up one of the extremely steep hills here, i started to adjust my breathing to something much closer to what we practice doing TC: beginning the exhalation as soon as the sharp inhale is done.

when the road flattens out again, my inhales become longer and fuller.

but i'm far less tired at the end of the ride when i remember to do the TC breathing than when i don't.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:40 pm

Seth

Let's look at this in a bit of detail as we go along.

• As to biking: research has suggested that cyclists who coordinate their breathing with their downward pushing on the pedals _ do indeed exercise more economically_

You need breathe deeply, and exhale fully to keep the muscles fully oxygenated and clear the body of carbon dioxide in this demanding aerobic work of biking.

* We Do not want to take little sips of air, as we will become fatigued quickly and start hyperventilating.

We Always want to Maximize the oxygen intake with every inhalation, long or short, even as we get into the explosive range, such as in climbing a steep hill.

It looks to me that even as you ‘sharp inhale’ you are taking in lots of oxygen before your exhale, and this is the key.

* Now_ When on the flat road _ momentum and steady reduced pedal effort [as compared to a hill] carries you forward.

* When climbing a Hill, you need more explosive output by your legs and body structure, much more ‘body structure' under more serious effort.
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