Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 20, 2020 5:07 pm

I've used several different methods over the years for jogging, hiking and mountain biking. None are perfect and some work better depending on the situation.

Bianchi KO fanny pack- I carry a Glock 27, spare G22 mag, 4" folder, credential case and depending on location and time of day- a Swiss Tool folding plier/knife and a Surefire flashlight.

I wrap a 3/4" wide strap with a side release buckle around the pack to keep everything snug and wear it to the rear. Bounces, but not too bad. If I need my gear, I have to unbuckle the side release buckle first.

CamelBak Mule - all the gear is held in the pocket on the hydration pack. As it is on my back, it is not convenient to get to. However, in the mountain biking and hiking community, hydration packs are the norm and not given a second look.

It is heavy with a full water bladder, but for longer trips and use in arid areas; it is my choice. I generally holster the Glock in a IWB holster in the CamelBak pocket so I can carry it if I need to ditch the hydration pack - ie. stopping for a meal, etc.

chest pack - I have a Professional Operator's Kit (POK) that I picked up before I discovered One Source Tactical. It will hold all the above items and has MOLLE strips on the outside and the inside velcro is also in MOLLE strips.

It gives plenty of options and can even be worn in conjunction with the CamelBak (just put the POK on first and buckle the CamelBak's sternum strap behind the POK).

The chest pack bounces some. I wear a t shirt and make sure that the collar is adjusted so that the straps don't rub directly on my neck. It usually takes me almost a mile to get used to the bouncing. It does look weird.


While none of these are perfect, they work better for me that wearing a belt holster. Just walking distances in my duty rig or with a strong side belt holster make my hip hurt.

All three would lend themselves to also carry a can of OC. Another option for a weapon would be to check out polymer weapons -

Cold Steel makes some such as the CIA letter opener. They are light and if you are in a NPE with an abundance of metal detectors, you could breeze through them in your running shorts.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Feb 20, 2020 5:08 pm

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Feb 21, 2020 4:57 am

I've been jogging/running since middle school, I'm now 51.

I've always gone armed since I was treed by a pack of dogs during a cross country practice run in high school. I've tried everything from pepper spray to mouse guns.


What works best for me now is a Spyderco Aqua Salt fixed blade. So far it has been impervious to my sweat which is like acid. I got a piece of 5" wide elastic and sewed hook and loop (velcro) to make a hip band. Then I sewed the sheath upside down to the band.

I wear the band around my hips and under my jogging shorts with the handle hanging down off my right hip along my leg under my shorts. I wear Nike or Under Armor jogging shorts which hides the knife well.

I can easily access the knife strong handed. No one in the pack at a 5 or 10k has ever guessed I had a 4" fixed blade on me.

When I run I religiously wear my dog tags with my name, address, blood type, wife's cell phone. I was once hit by a Buick driven by a blind woman.

I once passed out from heat exhaustion. It helped identify me when the PoPo and EMS showed up.


Over the years on several occasions I have been happy I was armed. I was once sized up for a robbery (my walkman) but the the trio either saw me palming my blade or their predator instinct told them to back off.


One time 4 punks screeched to a halt, jumped out of their car and said they were gonna woop my ass......I placed my hand on the handle but didn't draw and with a straight face and unwavering voice told them that would be a bad move on their part.

They all stopped in their tracts and one asked what I had hold of. I told him he didn't want any of it.... they drove off quickly...


When I go out for a day or evening run I never leave home without my blade, dog tags or ipod.....
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Feb 21, 2020 5:00 am



I know some guys who work out with a fixed blade "neck knife" on a lanyard under their shirts, good for the gym but it bounces around too much to run with.

I use something like this for a ~3 inch folding knife on my bicep or forearm on long runs (fixed blades are verbooten over here but concealed folders are fine):
http://www.nike.com/index.jhtml#l=ni...US&co=US&la=EN

With a knife in it, it's quite secure and low profile and it looks like an iPod/MP3 player on your arm even though it is out in plain sight.

You can clip your real iPod/MP3 player to the outside of it or to your waistband if you want actual tunes (or tuck the end of your headphone cord into it next to the knife for additional camouflage and to lull your assailant in to complacency : ).

It's water/sweat proof (my arm sweats alot less than my torso on a 3+ mile run) so your knife is protected from your sweat and quick enough to access and nobody I run by or even folks at the gym have ever given it a second glance.

Though IAWB is faster and more concealed it can be much less comfortable having the weight of your knife dragging down your shorts. Also this solution works even if you're wanting to shirtless and light/minimalist in hot weather.

I've gone on some runs or bicycle rides CCW with the gun in a hydration pack that I was bringing along for water anyways. A gun bouncing around on your back is no fun and access is VERY slow.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Feb 21, 2020 3:39 pm

The Five Points
Ayoob recommends a Five Point Check List of things you should point out to responding LEO's when they arrive that won't hurt your case and can only help bolster your claim of Self Defense. They are as follows:

1) Immediately point to the perpetrator and state "Officer, that man attacked me, I was in fear of my life and I was forced to defend myself!"

2) Then state "I will sign a criminal complaint against him." This tells the LEO's that your willingness to sign a legal complaint against the guy for attacking you that you are probably in fact the victim and not the guy bleeding on the ground who is in fact doing a pretty good impression of a victim.

After all, almost exclusively when LEO's respond to shootings, it is the guy bleeding on the ground who is usually the victim. Most shootings do not involved ccw holders who are the good guys.

3) Then point to any evidence you have found before the LEO's have arrived such as a knife, a gun, spent brass from his gun, a ball bat and say to officers "Evidence is here, here, here and here" as you point it out to the LEO's. This ensures that evidence is noted by responding officers, spent shell casing don't vanish and that all evidence is preserved.

4) If any witnesses have stayed around long enough for the police to arrive, they may not stay around long once police get there, or volunteer to come forward on their own. So say, Officer, the witnesses are here, and here and over there." and point them out to LEO's before they have a chance to leave.

Having their statements affirming the fact that you said, "Stop, leave me alone, don't hurt me" or anything else they can be helpful to your case will be lost if they are allowed to leave the scene because you wanted to assert your right to remain silent.

5) Finally say to the LEO's "Officer, I realize how serious this situation is and I will cooperate fully once I've had 24 hours to consult with my attorney!" And then clam up and keep your mouth shut! If they press you further, inform them that you've just been through a traumatic experience and again, you would like to speak with your attorney first and assure them they will have your full cooperation.


___After several years in law enforcement and having been involved in several incidents as a citizen, I can unequivocally state that you need to try to get potential witnesses to stay long enough to tell the police what they saw.

The odds are that anyone still hanging around after a self-defense incident is likely to be neutral or favorable to the victim. The rest have likely split the scene.

A WORD OF CAUTION!

DO NOT, DO NOT, DO NOT ask anyone, "Will you be a witness?"

95% of folks asked this question will experience constipation the likes of which they never have before.

They instantly think, "WITNESS! Oh, my GOD! Time off work! Interrogations! Court! Lawyers!" They will instantly tell you "NO!" and may even bolt from the scene.

Instead ask, "Can you tell the police what you saw?"

Everyone wants to tell their story. No one wants to be a witness.


Craig R. Brownell
Chief Instructor

__
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Feb 25, 2020 8:31 pm

Shibumi

The martial arts are a dignified calling. Appearing dignified is not the same as acting and sounding pretentious, as it will bring negative attention to yourself.

Unadorned distinction and excellence refers to a quality called shibumi.

In its simplicity and elegance, shibumi is about modesty and strength.

Unfortunately for many, the martial arts become a narcissistic, self-centered activity. Classical budo teachings warn against the workings of an egoic mind.

Training, meditation, and kata practice are tools the martial arts aspirant use to develop appropriate right action to any given situation. Through training, the student becomes transformed.

Self-importance, vanity, false pride, all fear-based behaviors, are replaced by positive attributes such as humility, calmness and inner peace.

Etiquette and formal behavior are usually not regarded as traits associated with fighting, especially today.

Politeness, sincerity of heart, self-control, self-sacrifice, and most importantly, honor, are all central to the standard of excellence a TMA student should seek to attain within himself.

Through this life journey, it is best to keep in mind the ‘idiot factor’ ….easy trap to fall into….

And that “Idiots have the right of way.” Always.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Feb 28, 2020 11:01 pm

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Feb 29, 2020 6:38 am

You have just been shot

Here it goes....Pop,pop,pop. You could swear the sound was just kids shooting off fireworks. After all you are walking through a crowded fair on a downtown city street.

Pop, pop, pop…there it goes again, but everyone around you just carries on_ business as usual. Then starts the commotion…people start running; there are a few screams, and the streets clear. Through the mayhem you see two young men tearing down the sidewalk...

One appears to be chasing the other…pop, pop,pop…this time you feel something hit you in the shoulder. Are those guys throwing stones at each other? Did a rock just hit you? It’s not until you see the glint of a gun in the crowd that the though occurs to you. You’ve been shot.

You reach for your shoulder. What you feel is squishy and sticky, and it is in fact a gaping hole just below your collar bone.

Up to this point you haven’t experienced any pain because [in one of those mysterious acts of the brain] you hadn’t realized you had been shot. Now, after touching the wound, and in effect sobering up a bit, the hot burning pain arrives.

Your brain begins to acknowledge the signal transmitted by the Noriceptors in the ruptured tissue of your shoulder.

Meanwhile the .38 caliber bullet lodged inside you has enjoyed a pretty wild ride itself. Once inside the body the bullets don’t continue to travel in any predictable direction; rather they ricochet off bones and organs losing their shape along the way and can bounce around the body like a pinball.

Although .38s and .45s are the big guns of choice in urban areas, most pathologists agree that .22 slugs are the most destructive; it’s not uncommon to hear that .22 slugs that enter the body through the lower back and somehow zig zag up and out through the right shoulder.

When the bullet first enters your body it tears through skin and then the pectoral muscle. Fortunately the bullet misses, although not by much, both the carotid and brachial arteries_ both of which would have been ruptured leading to a major blood loss and a swift death.

Instead it opens a hole in the muscle and nicks the clavicle bone sending tiny shards of bone matter into the surrounding soft tissue. Luckily, the slug stops its forward motion before exiting the body through the back. [exit wounds are messier than entrance wounds] _

As it passed through your body the .38 has created a cavity as it destroyed tissue in its wake. If you were able to watch the bullet in slow motion, you would see an even bigger cavity created by the displacement of the tissue, due to the kinetic energy created by the movement of the bullet. This temporary cavity returns to shape, like a sponge. The elasticity of the body actually prevents a lot of further damage.

There will be blood loss and countless cells have been ruptured by the path of the bullet; these cells spill their content into the surrounding tissue, and the result is an intense burning pain.

But even more painful are the splintered shards of bone …which scratch against and often pierce the surrounding tissue, muscle and blood vessels.

The combination of so many pain signals make the wound feel even larger than it is_ and to make matters worse, infection is still a possibility.

The bullet itself is sterile due to the heat produced upon firing, but the bits of clothing, hair and skin it picked up upon entry, is not.

After the pain you fell backwards, this is essentially a learned behavior.
Television and movies have taught us that when we are shot, we fall down.

But for a bullet to actually knock a person off his feet, physics dictates that the shooter should also need to fall over.

Strangers quickly surround you, someone yells ‘we need an ambulance’ somebody get an ambulance’…fifteen cell phones come out everybody calls 911.

You figure you’re going to be all right, but the pain and the blood loss have left you in a mild state of shock; as your blood pressure continues to drop you feel dazed_ another person yells “bring us some water”../but even in your semiconscious state you’re thinking you’d really prefer one of those funnel cakes … 8O 8O
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Feb 29, 2020 4:59 pm

It's just gas...

Two cases I investigated that I will never forget...

One involved a whole family wiped out from carbon monoxide poisoning in their home when the wife, coming back from shopping, left the car running in the attached garage and lowered the doors.

The other was a group of friends in a Ford Bronco who parked in a woodsy area to drink and party _ leaving the engine running to stay warm...

Problem was the tail pipe was blocked by heavy snow on the ground.8O


You will understand how it feels to die by carbon monoxide poisoning.

a warning to us all...as you read the chilling account. :(
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:59 pm

14 survival skills


From the National Geographic

1. Do the Next Right Thing

"Debriefings of survivors show repeatedly that they possess the capacity to break down the event they are faced with into small, manageable tasks," writes John Leach, a psychology professor at Lancaster University who has conducted some of the only research on the mental, emotional, and psychological elements of survival.

"Each step, each chunk must be as simple as possible.... Simple directed action is the key to regaining normal psychological functioning." This approach can sometimes seem counterintuitive. And yet almost any organized action can help you recover the ability to think clearly and aid in your survival.

For example, Pvt. Giles McCoy was aboard the U.S.S. Indianapolis when it was torpedoed and sank at the end of World War II, tossing some 900 men into the black of night and the shark-infested Pacific.

McCoy, a young Marine, was sucked under the boat and nearly drowned. He surfaced into a two-inch-thick slick of fuel oil, which soaked his life vest and kept him from swimming—although he could see a life raft, he couldn’t reach it.

So he tore off his vest and swam underwater, surfacing now and then, gasping, swallowing oil, and vomiting.

After getting hoisted onto the raft, he saw a group of miserable young sailors covered in oil and retching. One was "so badly burned that the skin was stripped from his arms," Doug Stanton writes in his gripping account of the event, In Harm’s Way.

McCoy’s response to this horrific situation was telling. "He resolved to take action: He would clean his pistol."

Irrelevant as that task may sound, it was exactly the right thing to do: organized, directed action.

He made each one of the sailors hold a piece of the pistol as he disassembled it. This began the process of letting him think clearly.

Forcing your brain to think sequentially—in times of crisis and in day-to-day life—can quiet dangerous emotions.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:01 pm

2. Control Your Destiny

Julian Rotter, a professor of psychology at the University of Connecticut, developed the concept of what he calls "locus of control." Some people, he says, view themselves as essentially in control of the good and bad things they experience—i.e., they have an internal locus of control.


Others believe that things are done to them by outside forces or happen by chance: an external locus. These worldviews are not absolutes. Most people combine the two.

But research shows that those with a strong internal locus are better off. In general, they’re less likely to find everyday activities distressing.

They don’t often complain, whine, or blame. And they take compliments and criticism in stride. The importance of this mentality is evidenced by tornado statistics.

In the past two decades Illinois has had about 50 percent more twisters than Alabama but far fewer fatalities. The discrepancy can be explained, in part, by a study in the journal Science, which found that Alabama residents believed their fate was controlled by God, not by them.

confidence in their own abilities and to take action. This doesn’t mean we should be overconfident. Rather, we should balance confidence with reasonable doubt, self-esteem with self-criticism.

And we should do this each day. As Al Siebert put it in his book The Survivor Personality, "Your habitual way of reacting to everyday events influences your chances of being a survivor in a crisis."
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:05 pm

3. Deny Denial

It is in our nature to believe that the weather will improve, that we’ll find our way again, or that night won’t fall on schedule. Denial, which psychologists call the "incredulity response," is almost universal, even among individuals with excellent training.


David Klinger, a retired Los Angeles police officer, describes in his book Into the Kill Zone that while moonlighting as a bank guard he saw "three masked figures with assault rifles run through the foyer of the bank." His first thought was that the local SWAT team was practicing.

His second was that they were dressed up for Halloween. Klinger later said, "[I thought] maybe they were trick-or-treaters. It was just disbelief." (He did recover from denial to shoot the criminals.)

One of the most common acts of denial is ignoring a fire alarm. When my daughters were little, I taught them that the sound of a fire alarm means that we must go outside.

Standing in front of a hotel at about two o’clock one cold Manhattan morning, I explained to them that it was nicer to be on the street wishing we were inside rather than inside wishing we were on the street.

Denial plays a large role in many wilderness accidents. Take getting lost. A hiker in denial will continue walking even after losing the trail, assuming he’ll regain it eventually.

He’ll press on—and become increasingly lost—even as doubt slowly creeps in.

Learn to recognize your tendency to see things not as they are but how you wish them to be and you’ll be better able to avoid such crises.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:12 pm

4. Use a Mantra

In a long and trying survival situation, most people need a mantra. Ask: What will keep me focused on getting home alive? Then learn your mantra before you need it.

For Steve Callahan, adrift in a raft for 76 days, his mantra was simply the word "survival." Over and over during the ordeal, he’d say things like "Concentrate on now, on survival."

Yossi Ghinsberg, a hiker who was lost in the Bolivian jungle for three weeks, repeatedly used the mantra "Man of action" to motivate himself.

Often, a mantra hints at some deeper meaning. Ghinsberg, for example, explained it this way: "A man of action does whatever he must, isn’t afraid, and doesn’t worry."

My personal mantra is "Trust the process." Once I’ve gone through the steps of creating a strategy, I continue telling myself to trust that the process will get me where I’m going.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 01, 2020 5:51 am

5. Think Positive

Viktor Frankl in his book Man’s Search for Meaning recounts the story of Jerry Long, who was 17 years old when he broke his neck in a diving accident. Long was completely paralyzed and had to use a stick held between his teeth to type.

Long wrote, "I view my life as being abundant with meaning and purpose. The attitude that I adopted on that fateful day has become my personal credo for life: I broke my neck, it didn’t break me."

Carol Dweck, a professor of psychology at Stanford University, would agree with this sentiment. Dweck studies individual learning habits, specifically how people grapple with difficult problems.

According to her research, individuals with a "growth mindset"—those who are not discouraged in the face of a challenge, who think positively, and who are not afraid to make or admit mistakes—are able to learn and adjust faster and more easily overcome obstacles.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 01, 2020 5:52 am

6. Understand Linked Systems

In complex systems, small changes can have large, unpredictable effects. I wrote an article for Adventure (September 2002) about an accident on Mount Hood in which a four-man team fell from just below the summit while roped together.

On the way down, they caught a two-man team and dragged them down too. Three hundred feet below, the falling mass of people and rope caught another three-man team. Everyone wound up in a vast crevasse.

Then, during the ensuing rescue attempt by the military, an Air Force Reserve Pave Hawk helicopter crashed and rolled down the mountain.

Because of the complex and coupled nature of the system in which all these people and all this equipment were operating, what had begun as a slip of one man’s foot wound up killing three people, severely injuring others, and costing taxpayers millions in the rescue effort.

Accidents are bound to happen. But they don’t have to happen to you if you recognize your role in a system.

Driving bumper to bumper at highway speeds, waiting for someone to tap his brakes and start a chain reaction accident is one example.

Having a retirement account heavily invested in the stock market is another. A small move by a few investors can send everyone stampeding for the door.

Being aware of such systems and analyzing the forces involved can often reveal that we’re doing something much riskier than it seems.
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