Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 09, 2020 2:15 pm

A stairwell is the ultimate in transitional areas. They are not an area where you linger, loiter or hang out. If you see someone standing there, something is wrong.

In open air staircases you may find someone smoking on the stoop, when that cigarette is done, the person returns to the apartment or business from whence he or she came. If you see someone smoking on the stairway and you aren't sure about them, wait a few minutes until the finish their cigarette...if they linger, you know something is amiss.

In an office building it is better to take the elevator. If you insist on taking the stairwell, take a cell phone. If you encounter someone suspicious on your way down, turn around and head back upstairs. If the door locks behind you, call someone in your office and ask them to open the door.

Elevators don't tend to be as dangerous as stairwells. Despite all those movie scenes where a couple proceeds to have wild, passionate clothes-ripping-sex after stopping the elevator, in any building built after 1950 you cannot hit the stop button without alarms screaming.

Also the fact that elevators tend to be continuously peopled tend to make them less dangerous. This doesn't mean you cannot be followed from an elevator. This is why it is best *not* to ride up with someone who makes you nervous. There is nothing that says you can't wait for the next car.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 09, 2020 2:16 pm

Leaving an event/location
Any place that attracts large numbers of people is usually safe. Leaving such a place, however, is often dangerous . It is not uncommon for criminals to position themselves along the walkways to and from such areas. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that people leaving an establishment will usually head towards the closest parking lot.

It is a simple feat to position oneself along that route in a way where you can successfully mug someone. Along with the "spread-out-along-a-wall that people will pass by" trap, there is the "pliers in a bottleneck" trap. This is to find a narrow area where people will pass through (i.e. overpass bridges, escalators, stairs or between a wall and a car) and take up a position where the victim will have to walk in between the muggers.

Another common pincer move is to take positions up to 50 yards apart. When you pass the first one and head towards the second, the first begins to follow you. It is the presence of the first following behind you that is the signal to the second that you are the person to be robbed.

While you should always walk wide of someone loitering in a fringe area, if you see someone else up ahead, loitering, don't enter the trap. If you do pass someone and another person steps out in front of you, look back over your shoulder to see if the first is following.

If yes, take evasive action and return where you came ...even if you have to climb over the face of the first person you passed. One you might be able to handle, but not two.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 09, 2020 2:18 pm

There are many small fringe areas that you might not immediately recognize as such. That is until you suddenly find yourself alone with a violent criminal, then it becomes amazingly clear.

Public restrooms. While those at beaches, parks, rest areas and bus stations can be downright terrifying all by themselves, when you are familiar with the idea of fringe areas you will discover exactly how isolated restrooms at malls and shopping centers can be. In many such locations, they are put off the beaten path, down empty halls and isolated stairways. During a peak shopping period, they are heavily populated. Off hours, they can be deserted.

Apartment laundry rooms. These are another place that people don't think of as fringe areas until something goes wrong. If you think about it, all an attacker needs to do is close and lock the door, and you are in serious trouble.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 09, 2020 2:19 pm

As you go through your weekly routine, look around you and see what areas you regularly travel are fringe. Learn to recognize those areas that you regularly find yourself in where you would be in danger. These are the places that you know you don't want to be trapped. If you see something you don't like...don't go there.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 5:16 am

The loud bang


I was transacting business at the teller window in my local bank. I immediately heard a loud BANG behind me. As I turned around a man in a ski mask yelled "Every one on the ground, this is a robbery" and fired another shot into the cieling. I noticed he was armed with some sort of 1911.

I was prone on the floor and my mind started to go a million miles an hour trying to figure out what to do, because I was armed also. Several times I had a clear shot at his back or side.

I did nothing. The individual received his cash and turned to walk out of the bank. As he passed me he pointed his weapon at me in a gesture of power. When he passed me I again had a clear shot at is back.

I was not afraid nor did I freeze. I just did not act.

As the police and FBI arrived I was questioned and had no problem from either agency that I was armed.

Several hours after this event I have been analyzing every moment. I have been going through some guilt worrying that if he robs another bank maybe that time he will kill someone.

What would you have done?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 5:19 am

Always keep your cell phone on your body


A janitor had left his cell phone in his jacket, which he was not wearing, when he accidentally locked himself in a small room in a courthouse. He was not "rescued" until 60 hours later.

Not always having your phone on your body can lead to a very 'crappy' situation.

Another point I'd like to make is to always keep your phone on your body while driving.

My sister-in-law recently rolled her convertible (It was an Olds Cutlass with a roll-bar, thank God) and since she kept her phone in her cup-holder, she had no idea where it went (still don't).

Luckily someone happened down the road only 5 or 10 minutes later, otherwise, the single-digit temps and the fact that she didn't have any warm clothes probably would have done her in.

(The car ended up upside-down and seeking shelter back inside the car that she barely managed to squeeze out of wasn't an option- not that she was thinking clearly afterwards).

Also guys- strap down stuff in your vehicles, and keep them clean. I'm not one to talk.

I am on the road a lot, and my car is TRASHED. Everything from computer parts to empty water bottles piled high enough to where my car is a 'one-seater'.

My point is that the CRT monitors in my trunk probably wouldn't feel too good coming through the back seat in a head-on, and at the very least, 5 or 6 months of car-garbage strewed about would be pretty embarrassing after a roll-over.

Lucky for her, she kept her car spotless. And she didn't die.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 5:22 am

Loose objects (including humans) in vehicle have killed people. Sometimes we forget Newton's laws. A can of beans in your back seat can have a pretty high speed relative to the back of your head during a collision.

I've heard that people have been severely injured when the corner of a Kleenex box hit their head when launched from its resting position on the back dash (or what ever you call that little spot where I used to sleep as a kid during long car trips).
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 5:23 am

I did ambulance work for several years in the Chicago area. Of all people injured or seriously killed (industry joke), most were thrown about the vehicle or struck by loose objects. The clear majority were not wearing their seat belts or they were wearing them improperly.

Improper would include putting the shoulder strap under your arm because it cuts into your neck. Seat belts depend on your body being thrown forward quickly to "lock up". If it's under your arm, it won't lock up soon enough. When it does lock up, the forces are likely to result in several broken ribs, possibly a punctured lung. Even at relatively low speeds.

Many folks ignore, deny or simply do not realize the effects of a collision on the human body, even at relatively low speeds. Compare a 20 mph collision to falling out of a tree from about 10 feet and landing on your face. You'll be spittin' bloody Chicklets.

Wear the seat belt and DEMAND that everyone else in your vehicle also wears theirs. Properly. No compromises. You may be an excellent driver, but you're sharing the road with a million morons. 'Nuff said.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 5:47 am

That Little Voice


Written by Combat Handguns December 2008. Author Archive »
Do you ever hear that little voice? The one that tells you, “Don’t!” in the moments before you do some ultimately regrettable and overtly stupid thing, and suffer for it?

Whether you are reaching just a little farther to paint that one small place on the house without getting down to move the ladder, or trying to ease the car through that space that just might be a little too narrow, or prying just a wee bit harder on some object with a screwdriver tip dangerously near some body part?

Do you always think back while sitting in the ER or lying on the ground in pain, or staring at the fender crease, “Something told me not to do that…”
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:46 am

In the mid to late 1970s I had a 28-mile commute from my hobby farm to work at a Federal Prison. Being a thrifty, some would say cheap, individual I used a 1973 Volkswagon Beetle to keep costs down.

The good thing about the bug was that for the time it was very thrifty at 32 MPG. The bad thing is that it was an underpowered vehicle that had a bad time just getting out of its own way. There were three instances where carrying a Colt Combat Commander in the VW’s glove box saved me.

The first event happened on a summer Sunday, I was working a 2:30 to 10:30 shift in a psychiatric ward of the facility. Leaving the farm at 1:30 I had a uneventful trip, however on entering a four lane street with a turn lane in the middle, I found myself behind a late model Corvette that was cruising at a leisurely 25 MPH on a 45 MPH street.

Being in a hurry I moved into a different lane to pass the Vette, but the Vette driver moved into that lane cutting me off. Again I tried to get around the Vette and again I was cut off.

Finally after several attempts to pass this guy and being cut off, I sped up and passed him by using the center turn lane. For some reason the fact that I passed him seemed to “set him off.” The next thing I knew this moron was tapping my rear bumper with the nose of his plastic rat.

This continued for about three blocks when we came to a stoplight where he started to get out of his Vette when the light changed.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:48 am

I didn’t wait around and got off the mark as soon as I could, only to have the Vette again begin bumping the rear of my Bug.

Trying to diffuse the situation and letting the Vette and its driver have a symbolic victory, I pulled off the road into a closed liquor store parking lot, hoping the idiot would just keep going and leave me alone.

Unfortunately, the Vette followed me into the parking lot, and parked behind me so that escape was impossible. The driver then got out, reached back into the Vette and pulled out a baseball bat put it on his shoulder and walked to my VW.

While he was doing his thing getting the bat I reached over to retrieve my Colt, racked a round into the chamber, put the safety on and waited to see what happened next.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:48 am

When the Vette driver reached my VW he yanked the driver’s door open, raised the bat and I yelled, “STOP!” and came up to a firing position focused on the front sight and his midsection.

He stopped, I then told him, “Turn around! Go back to your car! Do not drop your arm or I will blow a hole clean through you!” Thankfully he complied, walked back to his car with the bat held at an upright level, jumped in his Vette and was gone.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:53 am

Second time I was driving down on an old route where you could encounter some hills. Again, going to work, I was attempting to pass a Chevy Impala going up a hill.

He had been doing around 45 MPH in a 55 MPH zone and I decided to pass. As I pulled even with him in the on-coming lane he looked at me, grinned and began pacing with me. If I would speed up, so would he, if I would slow down, so would he. Looking ahead I saw on-coming traffic and I had nowhere to go except into a deep ditch which would certainly wreck my bug.


Again, reaching into the glove box I found the Colt, established a grip and pointed it in the direction of the other driver. His grin suddenly vanished and he floored the Chevy leaving me in the dust and allowing me to get back into the right lane without further incident.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 11, 2020 4:35 am

Subject: Fwd: CoronaVirus Prevention
THIS IS WORTH YOUR TIME TO READ:


some of you may have already seen this on social media, its been sent to all hospitals.

Dear Colleagues, as some of you may recall, when I was a professor of pathology at the University of California San Diego, I was one of the first molecular virologists in the world to work on coronaviruses (the 1970s).

I was the first to demonstrate the number of genes the virus contained. Since then, I have kept up with the coronavirus field and its multiple clinical transfers into the human population (e.g., SARS, MERS), from different animal sources.

The current projections for its expansion in the US are only probable, due to continued insufficient worldwide data, but it is most likely to be widespread in the US by mid to late March and April. Here is what I have done and the precautions that I take and will take.

These are the same precautions I currently use during our influenza seasons, except for the mask and gloves.:

1) NO HANDSHAKING! Use a fist bump, slight bow, elbow bump, etc.

2) Use ONLY your knuckle to touch light switches. elevator buttons, etc.. Lift the gasoline dispenser with a paper towel or use a disposable glove.

3) Open doors with your closed fist or hip - do not grasp the handle with your hand, unless there is no other way to open the door. Especially important on bathroom and post office/commercial doors.

4) Use disinfectant wipes at the stores when they are available, including wiping the handle and child seat in grocery carts.

5) Wash your hands with soap for 10-20 seconds and/or use a greater than 60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer whenever you return home from ANY activity that involves locations where other people have been.

6) Keep a bottle of sanitizer available at each of your home's entrances. AND in your car for use after getting gas or touching other contaminated objects when you can't immediately wash your hands.

7) If possible, cough or sneeze into a disposable tissue and discard. Use your elbow only if you have to. The clothing on your elbow will contain infectious virus that can be passed on for up to a week or more!

What I have stocked in preparation for the pandemic spread to the US:

1) Latex or nitrile latex disposable gloves for use when going shopping, using the gasoline pump, and all other outside activity when you come in contact with contaminated areas.

Note: This virus is spread in large droplets by coughing and sneezing. This means that the air will not infect you! BUT all the surfaces where these droplets land are infectious for about a week on average - everything that is associated with infected people will be contaminated and potentially infectious.
The virus is on surfaces and you will not be infected unless your unprotected face is directly coughed or sneezed upon. This virus only has cell receptors for lung cells (it only infects your lungs) The only way for the virus to infect you is through your nose or mouth via your hands or an infected cough or sneeze onto or into your nose or mouth.

2) Stock up now with disposable surgical masks and use them to prevent you from touching your nose and/or mouth (We touch our nose/mouth 90X/day without knowing it!). This is the only way this virus can infect you - it is lung-specific. The mask will not prevent the virus in a direct sneeze from getting into your nose or mouth - it is only to keep you from touching your nose or mouth.

3) Stock up now with hand sanitizers and latex/nitrile gloves (get the appropriate sizes for your family). The hand sanitizers must be alcohol-based and greater than 60% alcohol to be effective.

4) Stock up now with zinc lozenges. These lozenges have been proven to be effective in blocking coronavirus (and most other viruses) from multiplying in your throat and nasopharynx. Use as directed several times each day when you begin to feel ANY "cold-like" symptoms beginning. It is best to lie down and let the lozenge dissolve in the back of your throat and nasopharynx. Cold-Eeze lozenges is one brand available, but there are other brands available.

I, as many others do, hope that this pandemic will be reasonably contained, BUT I personally do not think it will be. Humans have never seen this snake-associated virus before and have no internal defense against it.
Tremendous worldwide efforts are being made to understand the molecular and clinical virology of this virus. Unbelievable molecular knowledge about the genomics, structure, and virulence of this virus has already been achieved. BUT, there will be NO drugs or vaccines available this year to protect us or limit the infection within us. Only symptomatic support is available.

I hope these personal thoughts will be helpful during this potentially catastrophic pandemic. You are welcome to share this email. Good luck to all of us! Jim

James Robb, MD FCAP

~~~~~~~~~~

CORONAVIRUS

1. If you have a runny nose and sputum, you have a common cold

2. Coronavirus pneumonia is a dry cough with no runny nose.

3. This new virus is not heat-resistant and will be killed by a temperature

of just 26/27 degrees. It hates the Sun.

4. If someone sneezes with it, it takes about 10 feet before it drops to the ground and is no longer airborne.

5. If it drops on a metal surface it will live for at least 12 hours - so if you come into contact with any metal surface - wash your hands as soon as you can with a bacterial soap.

6. On fabric it can survive for 6-12 hours. normal laundry detergent will kill it.

7. Drinking warm water is effective for all viruses. Try not to drink liquids with ice.

8. Wash your hands frequently as the virus can only live on your hands for 5-10 minutes, but - a lot can happen during that time - you can rub your eyes, pick your nose unwittingly and so on.

9. You should also gargle as a prevention. A simple solution of salt in warm water will suffice.

10. Can't emphasise enough - drink plenty of water!

THE SYMPTOMS

1. It will first infect the throat, so you'll have a sore throat lasting 3/4 days

2. The virus then blends into a nasal fluid that enters the trachea and then the lungs, causing pneumonia. This takes about 5/6 days further.

3. With the pneumonia comes high fever and difficulty in breathing.

4. The nasal congestion is not like the normal kind. You feel like you're drowning. It's imperative you then seek immediate attention.


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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Mar 11, 2020 8:54 pm

Last but not least happened at a stoplight when a group of young thugs thought a single driver in a VW was easy picking.

These folks had cased me by driving in front of, beside and behind me while displaying various hand signals and issuing verbal threats.

Again the Colt played a vital role when we came to a stoplight and three of these misguided youths bailed out of their car and ran towards mine.

Reaching into the glove box, retrieving the Colt and simply placing it on my leg with the hammer back/safety on, the first hooligan to my car saw I was armed screamed, “He’s got a gun!”

At that point they all turned around ran back to their car and blew through a red light to get away.

Thankfully I didn’t have to fire the weapon in these incidents. The paperwork would have been endless.
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