Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 07, 2020 2:21 pm

This is excellent reading.

Police One
Pilots in World War II would sometimes raise their wheels instead of their flaps after landing, causing these highly skilled fliers to crash from a simple, avoidable error.

Even changing the entire feel and look of the switches didn’t stop this from happening from time to time.

Stress can be the enemy of performance even when we are highly trained, but we have other enemies as well.

“Routine” creates a potential for bad “habits” to be incorporated into our key skills; and “artifacts” such as always shooting six rounds strings in firearms training because the course was developed with revolvers, or re-holstering in the middle of gunfight can pop up under the stress of a critical incident and expose us to increased hazard.

In “Ten Questions About Human Error,” Sidney Dekker points out how far we are from truly understanding why humans make mistakes and we are always juggling engineering with human performance.

How a young officer can start to draw his TASER and end up shooting a subject with his firearm is not very different than a pilot crashing his fighter by raising his landing gear after landing, only the consequences are usually more tragic for the officer and the subject being shot!

The human mind is a marvelous mystery and I encourage you (whether you’re a trainer, coach, or just someone who wants to improve his or her performance) to learn about learning!

There is an incredible variety of sources from which you can draw new knowledge, and an array of exercises you can employ to practice your skills and do you physical and mental repetitions.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 07, 2020 2:22 pm

Chris McKaskell »

Interesting.

Van, the biggest lesson I get from the police one article comes up in this forum's history as well -- under stress you're going to do what you've trained to do.

I'll shift some of our drills to be less reactionary. Makes good sense.

Hmmm, slowly changing mindset. Very interesting, thanks.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 07, 2020 2:26 pm

What should be enlightening to us all is the following:
Some recent events have brought up the issue of how we learn a skill and how we can make a mistake such as grabbing our firearm instead of our TASER.

A skill learned to the autonomous or habitual level can be done with very little conscious thought—in fact, conscious thought often interferes with a motor skill learned to this level.

Anxiety, fear, and doubt are corrosive to our performance for many reasons—one being that they cause us to bring our conscious awareness to a task that was automatic and properly performed at an unconscious level, therefore, our performance can deteriorate.

This is where science still searches for answers. We like to think we can have simple solutions for human performance under stress but problems still keep popping up.

“Routine” creates a potential for bad “habits” to be incorporated into our key skills_

In “Ten Questions About Human Error,” Sidney Dekker points out how far we are from truly understanding why humans make mistakes and we are always juggling engineering with human performance.

The human mind is a marvelous mystery and I encourage you (whether you’re a trainer, coach, or just someone who wants to improve his or her performance) to learn about learning!

There is an incredible variety of sources from which you can draw new knowledge, and an array of exercises you can employ to practice your skills and do you physical and mental repetitions.


• Read “The Survivors Club” by Ben Sherwood
• Read “Motor Control and Learning” by Richard Schmidt
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 07, 2020 5:27 pm

Let’s look at the legal view.


Criminal law…

Non deadly force

The general criminal law allows for the use of necessary and proportionate, non-deadly force in self-defense anytime the victim reasonably believes that unlawful force is about to be used on him.

‘About to’ refers to the imminence requirement for the right to self-defense.

The threatened use of force must be immediate.

The force used in self defense must reasonably appear to be necessary to prevent the attack, and must be proportionate to the gravity of the attack.


But when you strike first, you still must show that what you did was reasonably necessary.

In reality, chances are that you will get sucker punched even if you perceive something coming, because you will naturally hesitate while the brain registers the nature of an impending threat.

Where martial arts become useful here is in the much faster reaction time because of training...which might just get you out of the way or intercept something.

But if you are able to read the 'pre-incident indicators' , while still at a safe distance...if you decide to strike, as you have no other option to avoid, then you must do so decisively.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 07, 2020 5:28 pm

Self-defense, lethal force
:The standard for use of deadly force is, predictably, higher.

The general criminal law allows for the use of deadly force anytime a faultless victim reasonably believes that unlawful force which will cause death or grievous bodily harm is about to be used on him.

The general rule is that words alone are not enough to be considered a provocation under this standard, but there are exceptions.

For example, saying ‘I am about to shoot you’ might well constitute sufficient provocation.

One of the circumstances which helps to determine the level of threat encountered by the victim is the nature of the assailant’s weapon (if any).

As a general rule, anything which might be used to kill a person, no matter how odd, is considered a deadly weapon. Thus, a chair, a lamp or a screwdriver may all be considered deadly weapons.

In some instances, the law will treat trained fighters hands as a deadly weapon, but in order to trigger the right to self-defense using lethal force against such a person, the victim must, of course, know of the attacker’s special training.

U.S. courts are split with respect to an additional factor in the lawfulness of the use of deadly force in self-defense.

A minority of jurisdictions require a victim to retreat to the wall if it is safe to do so, before using deadly force.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 07, 2020 5:32 pm

Civil law
Self-defense in tort law:


While the principles of self-defense at tort law are similar to those at criminal law, the mode of analysis, and areas of emphasis differ.

In general, self-defense is valid when a person has reasonable grounds to believe that he is about to be attacked.

Under these circumstances, he may only use such force as is reasonably necessary to protect against the potential injury.

Since only reasonable grounds are required, a genuine mistake with respect to the attack will still support the right to self-defense.

_ Peter Hobart Esq.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 07, 2020 5:51 pm

This is the very critical problem that might well be facing some of us even as we try to learn how to sense an impending attack before it is actually launched in a true self defense situation as opposed to ‘dueling’/sparring/competition.

And this has been studied in depth by Darren Laur and reported in one of his articles.

Let’s review the points carefully…they are very interesting:
An officer assigned to jail duty conducts a prisoner bed check when he observes that a male who was lodged in the drunk tank was laying face down not breathing in a corner of the cell.

The officer attempts to verbally arouse the prisoner, but these attempts fail.

The officer now believing that the prisoner is dead, proceeds into the cell, bends over and grabs the prisoner by his left shoulder in an attempt to roll him over.

At this point the prisoner, suddenly and spontaneously, quickly rolls towards the officer, and with his right hand, swings towards the officer's face.

The officer "instinctively" pulls both of his arms in to protect his head, and moves backwards.

The suspect has now moved to his feet, and again lashes out towards the officer with what the officer "perceives" to be a big right hooking punch, at which time the officer again puts his hand up to cover his head, crouches and again moves backwards away from the threat.

The officer only now realizes that he is bleeding profusely, but doesn't know why. The prisoner lunges at the officer a third time, with a straight line punch, at which time the officer sees the shinning glimmer of a metal object.

As this third attack makes contact, he instinctively attempts to push the prisoners hands away from his body, but contact is made resulting in a puncture wound to the officer's chest area.

The officer now realizing that he is in an edged weapon encounter, and cut several times, disengages from the cell area to call for help.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Josann » Wed Jul 08, 2020 9:43 am

Van Canna wrote:
What should be enlightening to us all is the following:
Some recent events have brought up the issue of how we learn a skill and how we can make a mistake such as grabbing our firearm instead of our TASER.

A skill learned to the autonomous or habitual level can be done with very little conscious thought—in fact, conscious thought often interferes with a motor skill learned to this level.

Anxiety, fear, and doubt are corrosive to our performance for many reasons—one being that they cause us to bring our conscious awareness to a task that was automatic and properly performed at an unconscious level, therefore, our performance can deteriorate.

This is where science still searches for answers. We like to think we can have simple solutions for human performance under stress but problems still keep popping up.

“Routine” creates a potential for bad “habits” to be incorporated into our key skills_

In “Ten Questions About Human Error,” Sidney Dekker points out how far we are from truly understanding why humans make mistakes and we are always juggling engineering with human performance.

The human mind is a marvelous mystery and I encourage you (whether you’re a trainer, coach, or just someone who wants to improve his or her performance) to learn about learning!

There is an incredible variety of sources from which you can draw new knowledge, and an array of exercises you can employ to practice your skills and do you physical and mental repetitions.


• Read “The Survivors Club” by Ben Sherwood
• Read “Motor Control and Learning” by Richard Schmidt


Tony Blauer talks about what is called Hick’s Law which states that when a person has a large amounts of choices he will freeze under pressure as the mind is overwhelmed due to so many possibilities. He teaches that in self-defense this is often more of a problem for a trained person than an untrained person. He feels it is better to drill a handful of techniques so that when something happens you have something that is quickly available. I read a book by a Kenpo guy who was a student of Ed Parker named John McSweeney. I have it in my Kindle and review it every so often. He used to practice what he called 10 Power Strikes every day. He said that this is very valuable for self-defense, because when needed these skills will be quickly available to you. He emphasizes that there is a difference between fighting, sparring, and self-defense. He and Blauer both teach that self-defense is far more simple than martial arts make it out to be. Blauer’s all day training is very valuable. I did it a few years ago in Natick Mass. and found it very insightful and helpful. Most martial artist look down their nose at these one day seminars, but if you have some training under your belt and are in good shape what he teaches is very useful. Ego keeps too many guys from thinking it can be that simple.

Now when I train I work on power strikes and try to incorporate Tim McLarken‘s idea of “get your injury“ when I visualize what’s going on. A few quick, brief techniques, designed to injure the opponent. I also listen to a lot of the Morrison, particularly his lectures about mindset. Of course, being physically fit is also imperative.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 09, 2020 8:27 pm

Hi Josanne,

Thanks for the post, you always bring out very essential points to consider when it comes to self protection.

I, likewise, have the utmost respect for the persons you mention in your post as they have more ‘hands on’ experience than any typical martial artist, and this is not meant to be disparaging, it is simply the truth that becomes very evident once people put away the egos and assumptions that martial arts practice unfortunately fosters in practitioners.

We are now living in very difficult times with people in general acting out their rudeness and antisocial behavior in ways not always predictable. Gun stores have been picked clean of firearms and other personal weapons, there are fights over the wearing of masks requirements, long lines and social distance rule breakers.

And it will get worse… as it is more likely than ever to run into a psychopath twice your size who’s hell-bent on hurting and humiliating you for cheap thrills, and who is most likely carrying some kind of weapon.

I like your training focus on landing basic power strikes on the targets likely to produce a stopping injury as quickly as possible, because aside from possible adverse legalities, it is what seems to work best.

The biggest stumble in having to hit someone to shut him down is in the ability to …Quickly see open targets, (or to make them open), then utilize any one of specific techniques to attack those open targets.

And then overcoming the worry that even if able to connect, there will be a stopping effect v. a half ass flailing shot that will now make your opponent even more determined to hurt you bad or kill you...as well as hurting your own striking limb upon any given target.

Working the Bob with target impact drills is useful in imprinting those open targets…with feedback on any developing power…two men drills and free sparring are good in developing ways to make those targets open.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:51 pm

Why you are at risk as you're out shopping:
Some workers say they have been told they cannot refuse service to maskless customers, even if local laws require it. Others feel they’ve been put in the awkward and sometimes dangerous position of confronting shoppers who refuse to wear the coverings.

In recent weeks, retail workers have been punched in the face, suffered broken limbs and, in the case of a security guard at a Family Dollar store in Michigan, killed while trying to enforce mask requirements.
The Washington Post
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 10, 2020 4:24 am

But overall, when an actual “fight” is on, you really only have two options:

1. Try and end the confrontation quickly, on your terms, or...

2. Escape.


Despite any training ...with the exception of very few...we never really become 'fighters' even as we might do well in tournaments or in some scuffle. Rory points this out very well in his teachings. We don't have the 'repeat performances' against a wide spectrum of street opponents to even entertain the thought of being a fighter. Think about it.

Imagine a street fight and you will realize there will be four ranges you need to be proficient with as you will not always have a choice to avoid or leave. And if you are a martial artist, this very fact will work against you as there will be a tendency to take someone on, matter not how big/strong/mean/he appears to be...instead of walking away.

There will lots of flailing and a good chance of being taken down once the distance closes. And you are not likely going to prevail against someone twice your size and strenght no matter how hard you think you will hit...because of the opponent's adrenalized state, your misfired shots, and your misses.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 19, 2020 7:40 pm

Some people with martial arts training, have been known to just 'hope' some confrontation comes to an actual exchange of blows, so they can prove to themselves and to others how well their style works and how good and tough they really are, and they also somewhat expect it will all happen in a vacuum, without witnesses, phone cameras, surveillance cameras and other detection. And the opportunity to just disappear, without suffering any injuries to their body or striking limbs, because they really believe they are so conditioned.

They also like to dream of one shot stops, of opponents not too big and strong or skilled, of no weapons, of single opponents, of no criminal or civil liability exposure.


In any fight you will suffer some injury.

Any serious fight can result in broken jaws or cheekbones or eye sockets, damaged eyes, knocked out teeth, ripped ears, broken fingers, knife wounds, etc. Those kinds of injuries can be with you for life; avoid them if you can, whatever it takes.

I had to go through serious surgery and some long term care following two altercations with knives. Wasn't fun and I regret ever getting into such situations.

One opponent wound up losing his right hand due to gangrene following his punching me in the mouth and getting his fist seriously cut on my 'buck' front teeth.

A really serious infection was the result and the docs finally had to amputate his hand to save his life.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 19, 2020 7:42 pm

Today you also have a very good chance of being infected with covid-19 any time you close the distance and exchange spittle and other bodily fluids.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 20, 2020 1:15 am

What about this
When dealing with street people or drunks, one should never apologize -- especially if asked to do so. Be civil, but firm. Extending social courtesies to social deviants sends them the message that you are a bitch, and they can do whatever they want to you because you won't do #####.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 20, 2020 1:20 am

My experience
KentuckyUechi »

For some reason, this reminds me of an experience I had. When I first moved to Lincoln NE, the neighborhood I lived in wasn't the best. We spent the first couple of months in a run down trailer park. For a country boy such as myself, this seemed like a big city, so I tried to stay alert.

Well, one night I'm taking the trash out after dark. I check the alley it's empty. I take the trash to the dumpster and put it in. But as I turn around there is a figure heading up the alley towards me, when we get about 15 yards apart he quickly veers to the side.

Right in front of my trailer, that I had just come from. The wife and kids are inside, so not following him back to my trailer was not an option. When I go around the corner of the trailer, this guy is leaning against my truck smoking a cigarette.

Having worked in corrections and trained in the martial arts, I knew this was not a good thing. It "screamed" set-up! I had no doubt that the man had a weapon, and hadn't ruled out accomplices that had not revealed themselves yet. I figured I was totally screwed, and probably dead.

So I confidently (at least on the outside), walked right towards him. I stopped about 10 ft. away, and assertively asked "Can I help you", while maintaining eye contact.

He responded by saying "Man why you coming up in here trying to start somethin". His body language was saying "this is a chore, I was just relaxin, now I'm gonna have to mess you up". In my mind I was thinkin, here we go, it's on!

Obviously his whole reason for bein there was to "mess me up". He then said "I'm just settin in front of my house, trying to smoke a cigarette". When I pointed out that it was my house, and my truck he was leaning on..... He started looking around, and a light went on in his drunken mind.

His next response was "Oh Sh*t!!!, I'm so sorry!!, I thought I was at my place. When I told him it was not a problem. He confessed that I had scared him to death, he'd had no doubt I had come to kill him. I did not confess. Looking back it was a good learning experience, and kind of Hilarious that we were both being so cool, while inside we were sure we were about to die! 8O

Bert

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