How do you make Uechi work?

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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Art Rabesa » Thu Dec 29, 2016 1:15 am

Count Dante was killed when he, and a few of his students, busted into a competitors dojo. A green belt grabbed a sword off the wall and ran it through him. Tough times.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Dec 29, 2016 5:20 am

Yeah, the 'crazies' of the time...when karate was the newest fad, making people think they were invincible...not really much different than today with some people...

You might remember Pesare's blocking of arrows at tournaments...there is a karate sucker born every minute.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Art Rabesa » Thu Dec 29, 2016 2:30 pm

I asked him if I could choose the bow and the arrows next time. He just laughed. Very weak bow with blunt arrow tips shot from a good distance. I saw Ray Charles do this demo once - lol. Some demo's back then were like comedy skits. Danny Pi's vibrating palm was a good example. Remember that one?
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Dec 29, 2016 3:54 pm

Vibrating palm...yeah...turning his palm into a vibrator...good idea.

Bow and arrows...well, that did not stop someone firing a gun at Pesare once in a restaurant.

He had some good fighters though, you and I fought them now and then in tournaments...very good.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 05, 2017 3:50 pm

I know we have argued in the past about methods of training, kata, bunkai, prearranged kumites, etc.

We have all offered our opinions and argued them here in threads...but there is one thing...

What shall remain always impressive for me was meeting and working out with the likes of Yoki Yukiaki, Moto Yamakura, and Taro Tanaka [the street fighter]

All Japanese collegiate champions from the Seigo-Kan ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seigokan

Master Seigo Tada was a pupil of Chojun Miyagi and the head of the Karate Club at Ritsumeikan University. In the 1960s, Seigokan was considered the most important Goju-Ryu Association (Kai-Ha) in Japan, with more than 200,000 members.

Seigokan includes two unique kata created by Seigo Tada — Kihon-Tsuki-no kata and Kihon-Uke-no kata — in addition to the traditional Goju-ryu kata Sanchin, Tensho, Gekisai Dai Ichi, Gekisai Dai Ni, Saifa, Seienchin, Seipai, Shisochin, Sanseru, Seisan, Kururunfa and Suparinpei.


The Seigokan curriculum also includes Yakusoku Kumite (set sparring techniques) in the variants 1 to 7 of Zenkutsu and 1 to 7 of Shikodachi, as well as seven Torite (grappling and striking techniques). Today, SAJKA is directed by Sandaime Kancho — or Soke Seigo Tada III — who succeeded Mrs. Okamoto Michiko (Seigo Tada II), the widow of Seigo Tada Hanshi.


Now, we all know that the old time tournament fighters, like Joe Lewis, Chuck Norris, and Mike Stone...were formidable fighters/full contact...and not many US fighters were even good enough to draw them in preliminary matches in the blood bath tournament days of yore.

Well, Yoki...Moto...and Taro_ while visiting the Boston Mattson Academy_ entered national tournaments...like the first World karate championship/Chicago..

And the all American at the Madison Square garden with the rest of us on the fighting team.

Yoki advanced to semifinals against Mike Stone_

Taro advanced to semifinals against Joe Lewis_

Moto won the All American light weight championship and went up against
Chuck Norris for the grand championship, which Norris won.

They all came close to winning other than Moto who agreed Chuck Norris was the greatest.

Here is one good example of traditional methods of training including prearranged kumites that lifted those fighters to those great feats of performance.

All three fighters were avid practitioners of prearranged kumite in the Boston dojo, as I recall.

It did prove the point that kumite practice, done right, is a great training tool.

And Taro, was named the street fighter, because he was kind of crazy, and loved to pick fights with people bigger than him on the street, who all ended up on the ground.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 05, 2017 4:28 pm

Seigo Tada

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tadaTada was born in 1922 in Kyoto, Japan. He started training in the art of Karate in Shanghai, China in 1935, at the age of thirteen. In 1939, he entered the Ritsusmei University and studied Goju-Ryu Karate-Do under the master and founder of the style, Mr. Chojun Miyagi. He entered Ritsumei University nine years after Yamaguchi started the Karate club in Ritsumei-Kan. In 1943 he was nominated as a coach of the Ritsumeikan University Karatedo Club.

In 1981, he won the Hyogo Prefecture Athletic Award of Merit. Tada continued to enjoy teaching Karate and was able to see the 40th anniversary of his Seigo-Kan Karate Academy before his eventual death in late September of 1997. His legacy, Seigo-Kan remains one of the largest Goju-Ryu organizations in Japan.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 05, 2017 4:36 pm

Here is Moto...a great fighter, a great friend, a guest at my house many times...the most respectful and loyal friend anyone could dream of.

Image

Motoo Yamakura was born in Kyoto, Japan in 1943. At the age of 8 years, Yamakura studied Karate in the Temple of Kyoto where many Karate schools were to be found and later, at age 14 joined the Tojukuji Dojo a branch of Seigo Tada's organization.

Yamakura entered the all Western Goju-Ryu Seigo Kan tournaments, and was champion in both kata and kumite in 1965 and 1966.

In 1967, Mr. Yamakura entered the prestigious Henry Cho's All American Karate Tournament held in Madison Square Garden, New York and won the light weight championship.

After one final goodwill tournament in Muskegon, Michigan, he retired from competition.

When Mr. Yamakura came to the United States in 1967, there was no precedent in the immigration codes for his field of expertise. A new category was created and Mr. Yamakura was one of the first people to receive permanent residency status in the specially skilled labor category of Combat Fighting Specialist.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 05, 2017 4:40 pm

In 1969, he enlisted in the armed services and was assigned to the Special Forces teaching hand-to-hand combat. He demonstrated his martial arts skills for trainees at war games, battalion gatherings, for the Green Berets, and at his own graduation which was attended by the Undersecretary of State.

In 1974, Motoo Yamakura ended his military obligation as a Staff Sergeant. Mr. Yamakura is an international person.

He was born in Japan but traveled to the United States and became an American citizen. He studied English literature while in Japan.


He graduated from the foreign studies department where he also learned Spanish and studied Chinese as it relates to Japanese characters.


Sigh...how I miss Motoo...a real warrior...the greatest of friends...he was the referee at my fight with Nev Kimbrell we see on line, when I won the NH tournament championship.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 05, 2017 4:41 pm

He studied Kobudo in his youth, Judo in his school days, and has studied Karate and martial arts for over thirty-five years. While in Japan, he studied the styles of, Shotokan, Shito-Ryu, and Wado-Ryu and practiced Shorinji-Kempo.

He studied and taught Goju-Ryu, Uechi-Ryu, Tae-Kwon-Do and experienced Chinese martial arts while in the United States.


His Uechi studies were at the Boston Mattson karate Academy, where I was teaching free fighting_

His front kicks would take down a horse.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 05, 2017 4:43 pm

Mr. Yamakura is the author of Goju-Ryu Karate-Do, Fundamentals for Traditional Practitioners, Volumes I and II. MotooYamakura is Shihan, and Hachi Dan, and since 1983 has been the Chairman of the Goju-Ryu Karate-Do Kyokai International. The GKK is one of the largest, and oldest, Goju-Ryu organizations in the United States and also has programs in Canada, Mexico, South America, Europe, India, Sri Lanka and the Middle East.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jan 05, 2017 5:06 pm

Seigokan Dojo...dream dojo

http://seigokan-japan.com/

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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 06, 2017 5:18 pm

Anybody should be so lucky to have met and befriended by a gentleman warrior like Moto Yamakura...hope he is well and happy.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Art Rabesa » Fri Jan 06, 2017 11:31 pm

I remember Moto and Taro very well. We had some fun times in Boston back then. Moto was very different than Taro. He was a good person, although a terrific fighter. Taro was simply nuts. 5'3" of pure crazy. We tangled a few times in the Boston dojo. I know he wanted to kill me but I didn't think that was a very good idea. We both ALMOST went down the fire escape at the front of the dojo one night. I remember looking down to see if there was something I could land on. Taro became very angry when Chuck Norris hit Moto with that spinning back kick in New York. I grabbed his shirt at ring side. I thought he was going up into the ring. Like I said nuts. I enjoyed them both ---a great experience.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jan 07, 2017 5:33 am

Yes, very different individuals...Moto would tell me Taro was a street-fighter...that he picked fights on the street in Japan if someone would look at him cross eyed.

I had him once on my demo team when performing at a gathering in south Boston.

Taro thought someone in the audience was laughing at him, so he jumped off the stage to confront him. I was able to contain him, thankfully, also explaining that Southie was no place for that kind of shenanigans...as someone would pull a gun and shoot him dead...not like Gunless Japan.

He respected only the good fighters in the dojo...if someone went up against him and did not 'measure up' he would disdain him and yell out at the group of people in the class to have good fighters step up.

I had one fight with him at the dojo, where after he took me down, I returned the favor by leg locking him and spinning him to the floor. But he then got up, said 'very good' and shook my hand.

Dave Finkelstein talked about that fight for years on end.

At the All American, Taro was mad at Chuck Norris, because he had floored Moto twice with spinning back kicks, hurting him.

Following year...Walter Mattson kicked Taro out of the ring twice with his spinning flying back kicks in a Rhode Island tournament...

Someone laughed and he went after him.

Not someone to fight for real...he was like a kamikaze pilot.
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Re: How do you make Uechi work?

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 13, 2017 5:11 pm

https://www.goju.com/news-articles/299- ... e-do-vol-1

by Motoo Yamakura

An Excerpt from:
Goju-Ryu Karate-Do
Volume 1, Fundamentals for Traditional Practitioners

Motoo Yamakura was born in Kyoto, Japan in 1943. His father was an educator and an officer in the Japanese Imperial Army and led the English Battalion in World War I. After the war, the elder Yamakura spent most of his time teaching math and Japanese writings. In addition, he was an expert in kendo.

Motoo Yamakura was wild and violent in his youth. He was the type of child who was always getting into trouble. At the age of eight, he was renowned in his neighborhood as the best fighter in his age group. He was often involved in fights with older boys and was beaten up many times.
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