Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Rick Wilson » Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:53 pm

Self Defence is a very broad topic.

I turned sixty-one this year so I’ve been at martial arts and self defence training for a little while now. I started fooling around boxing with my grandfather, then a little Judo as a kid, a little Jujitsu as a teen, a little more Tae Kwon Do as an adult and then I found Uechi Ryu and have been at that now for… well I’m starting to count the decades now.

In each art and each school, I learn the physical aspects of how to protect myself. But self defence is a broad topic.

Even physical defence is a broad topic. Do you cover striking, grappling, weapons, ground, from a car…. Lots to cover.

But self defence is even broader than the physical.

There is the aspect of legal self defence. I was always told to only use my training to protect myself or others. Good advice but hardly what is needed to stay out of jail and away from bankruptcy when facing possible criminal charges or a civil suit.

But that isn’t all. I was always told to avoid the fight and to walk away. But I was never trained in the how. In fact, no drill we did actually had us walking away from a conflict. If you don’t train it – Less chance you will do it.

Awareness is a big buzz word in self defence. Be aware. Aware of what? Do you train what to watch for? Do you know how to walk cautiously but not with paranoia?

Do you train in the precursors to an assault? There’s a great picture I’ve included at the end of a Randy King from KPC seminar.

Do you train in post encounter? How to deal with the authorities. How to articulate why you did what you did.

WOW, self defence is such a broad topic.

Here is the thing, self defence is such a broad topic I don’t think any one instructor can be an expert on it all.

So, what do you do?

You can cross train.

Your school can bring in people.

Bring in someone to give a session of what the plea of self defence actually means.

Bring in someone to give a session of pre and post conflict.

Bring in someone to teach counter assault from the ground. Great for striking schools in particular but good for all.

Bring in someone to teach knife defence.

Bring in people to broaden your students’ training.


I know instructors who seem terrified that if their students see something different out there they will leave. I never found that and I don’t think it is true. I think the students appreciate an instructor and school that shows they want the best self defence for them by exposing them to as much as they can.

No one person can know it all but there are a lot of resources out there that can help.

Pre Attack Cues (Randy King): Image
http://wpd-rc.com/blog/self-defence-is- ... oad-topic/
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 490
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 17, 2017 11:06 pm

This is really the greatest topic, Rick...thank you...it really says it all...

1.Rick
In fact, no drill we did actually had us walking away from a conflict. If you don’t train it – Less chance you will do it.


It'll be like finding yourself in the eye of the hurricane looking for a way out you only assumed to be there while prancing about the dojo floor.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 17, 2017 11:11 pm

2.
Even physical defence is a broad topic. Do you cover striking, grappling, weapons, ground, from a car…. Lots to cover.


Well, you are going to hear that Uechi or whatever style du jour you are now involved with...is a complete style...whatever that means...and you really fell for it _ lock stock and barrel.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 18, 2017 4:03 pm

Rick
Do you train in post encounter? How to deal with the authorities. How to articulate why you did what you did.


Excellent...and I have alluded to this many times as well.

If you attend 'seminars' they will all be about some sort of 'technique' based event, which you will forget the next few days anyway, because there will not be any 'time ingraining'...so basically a 'Hollywood seminar'

What Rick is suggesting is a horse of a different color you will encounter to your complete dismay, unless specifically studied and practiced.

Techniques are a dime a dozen...you will only need several at most in a fight...and those will be what your 'ingraining' will allow to emerge in the chaos of the moment...you will not be able to pick and choose from yesterday's or tomorrow's seminars...
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 18, 2017 4:20 pm

Collins
Conflict dominance is not just a matter of having practiced a technique
so well that one has permanently learned it; it is not like riding a bicycle,
which one never forgets even if out of practice. Every conflict is a struggle
between who will be in the zone, and who will be in the glaze of combat.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:42 pm

Performing coolly in the midst of opponents' glaze of combat is always
relative to what is going on in the immediate situation. This accounts for
why a team may be beaten badly in a championship game.

To get to the
championship the team must have performed extremely well through the
season; in other words, it had shown many times that it could perform in
the zone while putting their opponents into a glaze.

But this capacity to
form a gestalt in which they control their confused opponents is brittle;
it is a social construction that can rapidly shift.

A team that relies most
strongly on its superiority in putting opponents at an emotional disadvantage
(as compared to grinding out relatively narrow victories) may be
especially vulnerable, when they lose their edge, to falling badly into the
glaze themselves.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:46 pm

The difference between tournament action and real life performance.


Sports are artificial social constructions in just the respect that they
channel the most highly competent competitors into eventually matching
up against each other.

In real-life violence, such matchups are generally
avoided.


Even so, competence that depends on being in the zone while
others are in the glaze of combat is ah intrinsically relative thing.

This is
one of the reasons why there is a ceiling on how many persons at any one
time can be in the violent elite.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:47 pm

Collins
We should not draw an absolute distinction between hot and cold techniques
as far as their effectiveness in winning a confrontation.

True, there
is probably a correlation between cool techniques and highly competent
violence—those best able to hit their targets, make their kill, win the fight
or the game.

Those who engage in hot violence are more likely to be the
actively violent than the competently violent
_ the middle-ranking rather
than the highest, the soldiers who fire often but don't hit anything, the
noisy activists in a rioting crowd.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:49 pm

The lessons you never learn in any dojo that teaches 'assumptions'...

But it would not be the right formula to claim that victory always consists
in cool violence prevailing over hot violence.

There are two main
complications.

First, some fights and battles hinge on accidents: falling
down, traffic jams of bodies or vehicles, lucky or unlucky hits, friendly
fire;

incompetent violence is often unpredictable when many small incidents
are compounded and concatenated.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:57 pm

And second, there are successful
forms of hot violence. The most spectacular is a forward panic, which
is a winning rush upon a suddenly defenseless enemy whose organization
has crumbled.


And this is exactly what happened to the black belt tournament champion who had his throat cut by the Jamaican gang banger who rushed upon him out of the darkness.

The Black belt's 'organization' [his arrogant beliefs he could take on all comers because of his tournament experience] vanished in a moment of utter terror _ with police forensics indicating he had not been able to mount any kind of successful defense.

It is indeed true what Rory writes...that we don't develop meaningful ways against real violence, because as martial artists we only 'play at violence'_
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:09 pm

Rick
I know instructors who seem terrified that if their students see something different out there they will leave. I never found that and I don’t think it is true. I think the students appreciate an instructor and school that shows they want the best self defence for them by exposing them to as much as they can.


I have found over the years that if a student leaves because he sees something else, he is just trying to cover up for his marginal performance in the style he was in.

I mentioned a couple of examples here at one time, one of them involving someone in Uechi who thought that after having trained for one year, he should have been able to travel to Chicago in the first World Karate championships and win most of his matches.

He lost his first match, sprained his foot badly, and kept on blaming the Uechi style and George for his piss poor performance.

So upon return to Boston he ditched both Uechi Ryu and GEM...went to Japan to train for a few months with Hidetaka Nishiyama of Shotokan fame...

Returned as a Shodan and opened up his own dojo.

Several years later he disappeared from sight.

We are going to get people like that no matter what we do.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Rick Wilson » Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:52 am

Great points as always, Van.

The first thing I would like students to do is get away from the thought that their teacher must be a master at all things self defence. Self defence is too broad a topic. They can be knowledgeable on many aspect but they do not have to be the “best” at everything.

I’ve taken the time to study about the plea of self defence and I can give a darn good layman talk on the topic (meaning NOT legal advice). I can help self defence practitioners understand a little more and perhaps how to attempt to try to stay on the right side of that plea BUT I would gladly sit in on a lecture by a lawyer who deals in self defence. In fact, when he was here in Edmonton I enjoyed Kasey Keckeisen’s use of force lecture that he gives to his SWAT team members. I learned and confirmed information.

Self defence is so broad the teacher can’t be expected to know everything but by bringing in people they can broaden both their knowledge and their students.

As well those schools and instructors can incorporate what they learn from visiting teachers into their teachings.

Understanding the plea of self defence will alter how you present information to your students. By including comments on the proper use of force as you teach the application of force then that vital information is reinforced.

I have seminars I present, but this isn’t a promo for what I teach. When I come in and teach my “From the Ground UP” seminar which is counter assault from the ground I expect that whoever learns it will continue to practice and incorporate it into what they do. They may never go as in-depth as I have but it will fill holes.

There is no system or style that covers everything but that doesn’t mean your system or style can’t incorporate and adapt new training (which is one of the reasons Uechi has remained my base - because it adapts so well.)

Here's another example. One person who came to train with me for a while is Paul Hunter, a former Alberta Sheriff and now Alberta Peace Officer, Paul is also one of two people certified to teach Michael Janich’s Martial Blades Concepts (MBC) in Canada. He did a seminar at a Tae Kwon Do (TKD) school and they loved it. They loved it so much they arranged for Paul to come and teach at the school once a week and open it to drop in students so their students could continue to train and others could join in as well.

That is what I am talking about.

That TKD instructor recognized a need in his school for knife defence and brought a fantastic guy to teach it and then expanded that so his students could continue to train in it.

He isn’t going to lose any students over it and I suspect he not only will keep them but some of the outside drop in students may become interested in such an open-minded approach.

As an aside, I also had the other MBC certified instructor (Rhonda Lynn) come train with me too.

Knife, ground, grappling, striking, violence dynamics, conflict communication, so many topics so little time. No time to master them all but plenty of time to meet new people and expand of understanding and knowledge base.

This post is also to all the students out there, your teacher is one person and cannot be master of all things so don’t put that weight on their shoulders.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 490
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 21, 2017 5:04 am

Great post Rick...and for the people who understand the complexities of 'self protection' it really should be a 'no brainer'...

The theme of my forum has always been that, as you point out, Uechi Ryu, as a central tool box, is indeed very adaptable if one is lucky enough to understand all its nuances, creating a stage for the many forms of tactical components to show up and join the 'play'...

I think that one of the problems to anticipate and learn to deal with in the practice of any martial art, is the 'expectations' and the 'mental injuries' that one is likely to fall prey to, especially in the 'style hoppers' _

we see the emotional let downs, the slapped ego, and the sadness and anger that sling shoots a confused student into another 'promised land' so he can once again get some sleep at night.

George and I were really saddened by the reaction of the particular individual I mentioned who blamed the style and the teacher for his failure at the Chicago World event. His expectations had dissolved in a bucket of water where he had to soak his badly sprained foot the whole weekend he was there.

There goes one real enemy we, as teachers, will have now and then from disenchantment ...how dare we have interfered with his quest of the 'holy grail' ?
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jul 21, 2017 5:12 am

Here Collins writes something very mentally graphic
For the intellectual world, the network structure tends to reproduce the
pattern of a small number of stars; both because only a few lineages and
clusters are generated at the center of action, and because those at the
center de-energize and exclude other competitors.

We come now to the micro-mechanisms by which a small number of
individuals make themselves the elite, while others who start out with
similar ambitions and opportunities drop by the wayside.

The creative
elite builds up emotional energy specific to a particular branch of the
intellectual field—philosophers, mathematicians, sociologists, painters,
etc.—whatever constitutes itself as a self-enclosed attention space.

Within
this space, there is competition over a small number of niches, positions
that can receive recognition.

Emotional energy in its general form is the
sense of enthusiasm, confidence, and initiative; in the case of abstract
verbal intellectuals, they work with ideas that feel successful (feel like
great ideas). They enjoy using their intellectual techniques and renew their
energy by using them.


And this reminds me of what you have done with the field of self defense/self protection.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Self Defence is a very broad topic.

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 22, 2017 4:12 am

Their techniques are cool precisely
because they are designed to keep one from being affected by the hot
emotions of combat; they batten on opponents' emotional states, not just
on the confrontational tension and fear that makes most people incompetent,
but also on the hot anger and confrontational courage or bravado
that can also be manipulated by a cool opponent.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 45822
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am


Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests