THE KNIFE

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 24, 2017 11:46 pm

Ugly fights, especially with multiple threats are too fast for the conscious mind to keep up with. Which doesn't mean you can't or won't make good decisions- you will. You'll just have to consciously figure out the "whys" when it's all over.

Rory
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 24, 2017 11:48 pm

Dave Young
My knife encounters were in responding to bar fight – (stabbed in the lower bottom lip - knife), domestic call – (cut under my chin) - machette, in a detention facility – (puncture to the top right hand- sharped pencil), moonlighting at a nght club and breaking up a fight - Cut to he back of my left hand - neck knife, and one walking to my car – (was able to create distance to avoid cut. - cheap over the counter pocket knife)

In interviewing several law enforcement and correctional officers who have had similar knife attacks, some of the basic comments were; I didn’t see it until I was cut,” I had no idea he had a knife in his hand,” I didn’t think she would have done thank, I never saw it coming…etc…

Here are a few of the early warning signs which may help.

Indicators for knife or sudden attacks;
1. Hands – are they empty and visible, do they have cuts on them, opening and closing them in a fist
2. Fingers moving or tapping
3. Arms – shaving marks or cuts on them from testing a blade on the skin
4. Do the hands favor a special location on the body when they are talking with you, or touch a place on the body (Sometime this is done subconsciously without them realizing they are doing it)
5. Posture – how are they standing, feet balanced, shifting weight, top part of body leaning forward to the rear
6. Eyes shifting, or wondering
7. Tone of voice
8. Uptight mannerisms
9. Uncontrollable pacing side to side or back and forth
10. Closing distance or creating distance
11. And much more…!

Training Issues; - There are MANY drills a person can do to build up and perfect this area:
1. Improving your Reaction Time – Hand and eye coordination is important
2. Reflexes – building your state of awareness
3. Avoidance – movement, hand tactics to defend the attack
4. Environmental factors
5. Mental commitment to follow through with plan
6. Field proven techniques – DO NOT DO WHAT YOU THINK IS COOL – DO WHAT WORKS FOR YOU!

Hope that answered your question.


Dave
Stay Safe, Stay Strong, STAY ALIVE!
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 4:47 am

This is how you will end up against a knife.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWQfgwuOAxo
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 4:50 am

This is what it looks like when somebody pulls a knife on you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWQfgwuOAxo
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 4:54 am

Roy Bedard »

So here is a good glimpse into the ugliness of combat. No pre-arranged movements, no pre-arranged responses. Only a sudden primal survival reaction that leaves the attacked cut in almost every case.

Notice the instructor shouts only to get the knife. There is no shouts about knee to the stomach, strike the groin, elbow to the head. Only - "get the knife".

This is the concept introduced by many combat specialists and is so poignantly described in Gladwell's book BLINK. It is also the theory of the Chess game that I posted on this forum. If you want to engineer a strategy you first study the innate response. You figure out what happens in the blink of an eye.

You do these tests a bunch of times and come to understand what your hands do, your body does, your mind does when suddenly and brutally attacked. Then you train to it. You see, you cannot train a first response, so you have to learn to train to the first response.

Looking at these videos you see a few episodes where these guys try to make something happen. They get lost in a technique that isn't working. They get stabbed and slashed and still they work that single technique ad nauseum.

This is what happens when we over-engineer a response in the dojo. We cloud the issue by suggesting that there is one better solution to the problem than any other. We suggest that there is one right solution and we drill it.

What we discover by testing the trained response is that the law of specificity almost always turns the fight to the favor of the assailant. In our business we have to learn how to reverse engineer our tactics. Let the BLINK factor speak for itself.

So what to do about these types of attacks as a teacher? How do you get students to prepare for them? How do you teach to survive them?
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 4:59 am

Norm Abrahamson »

I don't know what guidelines were in place for the drill, but one thing I noticed is that the unarmed fighter always seemed to wait for the the knife attack. As soon as you know there is a knife in play, I think you need to do something fast.

For the drill, it would probably be to immediately strike the armed opponent. My one "real life" experience happened when I was 11. As soon as I saw the knife I was gone. No delay, no posturing. I still see escape as a reasonable response to a knife attack.

Sincerely,

Norm Abrahamson
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 5:04 am

Roy Bedard »

It is hard for us to believe that the proper response to sudden aggressive attacks may already be built in.

As Carl Jung described the collective unconscious, he proposed that human experiences can actually be passed on through the generations as sort of a psychological DNA. If true, combat has to be one of the most entrenched components of our psyche.

The fight and flight response is well observed amongst all members of any given species. A sudden violent attack calls upon the limbic system to take some action when a deadly, and the operative word is deadly, threat exists.

The response of the body is automatic. It cannot be fully controlled except in some small way through proper breathing exercises. There is a chemical reaction that will override a well thought out rational plan in order to protect the one who is burdened with the sudden bad news that they may be killed in the next few moments.

As Norm points out, a first strike, a pre-emptive strike is a good idea. Regrettably, it is the not realizing part that results in pre-emptive strikes rarely occurring.

To present an effective defense with a pre-emptive attack, where you are actually in control of your attack or defense, where your body has not engaged the limbic system, requires that you first understand the cues and key features of an imminent attack...and be right about it.

James Burke, in his book The Day the Universe changed says, "It is the brain which sees, not the eye.

Reality is in the brain before it is experienced, or else the signals we get from the eye would make no sense."

So from a training perspective if we are to train for defense against "real" attacks, we have to invent reality in a controlled environment. We have to make it seem real.

We have to use props and specific environments. We have to use actors and bring about real emotions to induce combat stress. Yes, we have to get out of the Gi, and even out of the dojo.

We have to spend less time studying specific techniques and more time studying specific situations.

We have to invent scenarios that are not fantastic or outlandish, but rather typical in order to discern the features of human interactions that are normal versus those that are abnormal in order to create a mechanism for an early warning system that tells us that danger is present.

In short, we have to come of age.

RRB
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 5:06 am

Norm Abrahamson »

It is extremely difficult, at least for me, to try to drill students using pre-emptive strikes.

One thing I have said over and over again, is that even if you are "defensive," the fight begins BEFORE the first punch is thrown. Somebody is often being overly agressive, loud, pointing or poking, red faced, or even calmly and quickly closing distance.

These factors indicate you're in a fight, even if you haven't been hit yet. I know there has been a lot written on this forum regarding the chemical cocktail, dilating pupils, and other physical manifestations of combat.

But isn't the key to survival being open to recognize the feeling and be willing to act on it?

Hopefully what I say and the drills we do will help a student to recognize he or she is in a fight before the attack, and that will allow a fight or flight response.

I suppose it's a far cry from perfect, but it is an attempt to have training mirror reality.

Sincerely,

Norm Abrahamson
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 5:12 am

Roy Bedard

So what we see when we take the raw martial arts and apply them to actual combat in America is that they are a bit mismatched. They aren't necessarily designed to deal with the new kinds of attacks that the west offers; that's obvious,

but I think in a more profound sense, they are operating in a highly litigious society that discourages pre-emptive strikes and mentally conditions its members to be able to articulate the attack that was percieved so that reasonable people, who will stand in judgement agree that the defense was necessary.

This overly cautious mindset causes a form of denial that has become a cultural norm. It creates a habit of dismissing critical intuitive feelings that an attack is imminent.

In America we force the art to be a science, and science requires proofs. Gut feeling, intuition, spider-sense, call it what you will are all very real things indeed, but very indefensible. That's why in the last post I said that... you have to be right.

How does one describe intuition to a peer group who stands in judgement of their defensive pre-emptive attack? Well, we try to characterize it in physical, observable behavior.
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 5:13 am

Roy Bedard

The amazing thing is that we are all hardwired to percieve danger, recognize its imminence and respond in a blink to a primal fight and/or flight response. It is our intuition that keeps us safe and alive. Nothing more...or less.

Yet intuition is dismissed as being non-scientific, and therefore a liability. It's tough to train to it because it defies proof.

So most dojo's today teach to wait for a visual attack, an apparent motive. Not on purpose mind you, but rather it is implied in the way we perform the ritualistic combat scenarios.

Intuition is absent in most classical dojos and it will remain absent until we leave the dojo, its hardwood floors and secure walls which trap in the values, attitudes and norms of eighteenth century Asia .
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Re: THE KNIFE

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 25, 2017 2:30 pm

Keep watching this clip...it helps dispel fantasies about how you will handle someone who suddenly pulls a blade.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWQfgwuOAxo
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