My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:10 pm

Is there an absolute answer in Knife Defence?

Answer – no.

I wrote a book on knife defence but if you expected me to say there is an absolute answer to knife defence - just read my book, you’d be wrong.

I see a number of clips criticising other approaches, most often to promote the poster’s own approach. I’m not into that, particularly when I see things like “this is why Aikido fails” and then they show some guy in a Hakama trying to reach out and grab a waving wrist. Nowhere have I ever seen an Aikidoka try and reach out to grab a non-threatening wrist. I have often said if you perform a technique wrong then don't be surprised it failed.

I’ve seen a clip where a talent practitioner said never, NEVER in a knife assault will it be from the front and from a distance, and that was followed by clips of real knife assaults in which three were from the front and two of those were from a distance.

Knife defence is a really tough topic. You’re facing a person with a tool that can inflict a lot of damage and you are trying to deal with them without a tool.

Knife defence is complicated. People are different and different approaches will resonate with different individuals.

One Peace Officer I was talking to had successfully defended himself three times in a knife assault by grabbing hold of the weapon arm’s bicep and slamming the Aggressor to the ground. I couldn’t critic that officer’s approach because it worked for him and that is fine for him but never extend what works for you to someone else. He was also a big strong guy. Another female Peace Officer I was teaching commented the grab the bicep approach didn’t work for her because her hands weren’t big enough to even grab the average man’s bicep. So, again, because we are all different it makes sense different techniques will better suit different people.

However, there are underlying principles that can be applied to all approaches. Those are the true value we can look for in any approach that should carry over to all approaches and improve them regardless of the techniques used.

That is something I think my book “Watch Out For The Pointy End” can contribute to the body of knife defence material. The book goes into detail on some of the principles I use in self defence that I feel can apply to any system, style or technique. I truly believe that they can enhance anyone’s performance.

There is a technique to use in knife defence in my book for two reasons: first, you need a technique to hang principles on or to illustrate the principles, and two if you do not already have an approach to deal with knife defence then this gives one.

My book is not intended to say this technique is better than everyone else’s; it is just an attempt to help out with a truly difficult and dangerous topic in self defence.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Van Canna » Wed Oct 18, 2017 4:26 pm

Great post Rick...so well said.

A common problem is a martial artist, good as he might be, against empty hands attacks...truly believe that if he were to attacked with a knife...whatever he learned in empty hands exchanges...will get him through against the knife as well. You might even hear a story from him how he once did so without problems...really believing he will do the same in the next attack and or he is now qualified to teach knife defense to the average student in a class.

Same as in empty hands...you may have prevailed once...but you have no guarantee the next opponent you meet won't bury you.

But you will hear all the tournaments he has won and all the 'real fights' he prevailed in.

This is really the 'scourge' of the martial arts.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 50701
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Wed Oct 25, 2017 6:20 pm

The first review is on Amazon - Thank you, Shawn.

5 out of 5 stars on Amazon review

“The best training you can get without being there.”

Ever since I was attacked by a person with a knife, I have taken numerous knife defense courses and training. There is a lot of training out there that does not grasp the reality of a knife attack. There are many people and martial art instructors that do not grasp that there is a difference between fantasy and reality. Rick Wilson knows the difference. Rick Wilson's knife defense system is very reality-based. The concepts and the training drills presented in this book will increase your reaction time when attacked with a knife. I also love how Rick separates the principles and techniques for if you are law enforcement/ security or if you do not have that duty to control your attacker.


If you are a martial art instructor and want to teach your students skills and techniques that actually work in real life - Buy this book !!

If you are a person that is becoming increasingly concerned with the random violence today and want to learn how to protect yourself or your family members - Buy this book !!


Shawn Baker
Control Tactics Instructor
Edmonton Alberta
http://ctsscanada.ca/
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Fri Oct 27, 2017 9:34 pm

Preparing for the Harsh Reality of a Knife Assault

At the bottom of this post is a link to an excellent article analysing videos of knife assaults and finding the commonalities in a true knife assault rather than what is often thought of as a knife attack.

The article points out the very real issue of the lack of expertise in defending against knife assaults. How many experiences does it take to be an expert? How many people have multiple experiences against a knife assault? How then can we deal with something when you cannot become an expert through experience? My approach was the same as I see this article took – study and figure out what a real knife assault would be and try your best to prepare for that.

A quick summary of what the article found, and I won’t go into the detail as the article does so very well, is:

• 71.1% of knife attacks are led with the empty hand
• Most knife attacks are ambushes, not duels
• 70.6% of knife attacks are launched within 3 feet of the victim
• Knife attacks are fast and furious
• Knife attacks don't last long
• Knife attacks are more often performed with quick, short, repetitive stabs at different angles


Before I carry on let me point out this refers to the majority (70%+) of attacks, there are still 30% that can be from a distance and large movements etc., so there are no absolutes in how a knife will come at you but not only does this describe the majority of attacks but also that those are the hardest to deal with.

These attacks are exactly what my book “Watch Out For the Pointy End” hopes to help people train for.

My approach does not have you dealing with those attacks at the start. Those dangerous hard attacks are where the book goes; however, you do not learn to hit a baseball by swinging at 90 mph fast balls because you have to learn the skills and principles required before you give that a go. I take the same approach in the book beginning with attacks from a distance and in front of you. Then the distance shrinks and the attacks uses shorter movements and things get tougher.

In addition, you have to have the method and skills to deal with the “quick, short repetitive stabs” before you try and deal with them. Also, keep in mind the best ambushes come from behind or from the side. This is where the operant conditioning of the first response comes in for the book.

I have done my best to present a method to try and progressively prepare for this dangerous topic but I want to add that, as much as I think the book can give you, it isn’t magic, and you must put in the time and practice to get the skills and to condition the tactical habit to be able to survive the fury of a knife assault.

If you have the will and desire the book can give you a decent path to improve your odds of survival. Of course, survival is a result of the totality of circumstances and facing a real knife assault puts you in a bad place from the get go. All of which means, for me, you need to work hard, hence my focus on knife defence for the past few decades.

Watch Out for the Pointy End


Self-defence against knife attacks: a full review
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Van Canna » Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:34 am

One knifing case I investigated under statutory worker's compensation, involved this young woman selling movie house tickets from an enclosed booth at the main street entrance.

Problem was the door to the booth had a defective lock and it could be accessed by anyone in the lobby.

So one evening, this demented POS, who had recently been dumped by his girl friend, felt that the ticket girl looked much like his ex ...and attempted to kill her.

He yanked the booth's door at the shoulders of the girl open, and plunged a large kitchen knife into her right side, slicing her liver in half.

Fortunately the surgeons were able to save her life.

When I went to see her to set her up for Worker's compensation benefits, I got very depressed in seeing this lovely young girl so badly physically and mentally traumatized for life.

It is a terrible world out there.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 50701
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:57 pm

Absolutely right, Van.


Knife Defence is tough so getting it right is important

This is for those who have my knife defence book “Watch Out For The Pointy End.” I say that because I want to talk about a couple of the details in making things work; therefore, you need the book to know what I am referring to.

The book has 21 principles listed that you employ to make a fairly simple technique work. But like all things when facing a knife, nothing is all that simple.

I won’t go into detail here because it is all in book but our goal is to survive. There are four strategies to survive. Two require gaining distance from the Aggressor: Escape and Propel and deploy (grab) a weapon. Two require closing on the Aggressor: Disable and Control.

Unless you can escape or deploy a weapon before the assault, which is not always possible because the best way to make a knife assault successful is to take you by surprise, you will have to have at minimum a brief engagement with the Aggressor.

Under the two sets of tactics to survive a knife assault, Distancing Tactics and Closing tactics the first tactic is the same: “Avoid while intercepting the attack.”

Let’s face it if in that first horrific instance of the assault you do not get stabbed then you have a moment to make things better because the Aggressor’s approach of an ambush has failed. So getting that first tactic right is vital.

The first half of the tactic is “avoid” and that is done through rotation. This is the first thing I want to talk about to make sure those working with the book succeed. A common flaw is to not rotate enough. We want to end facing empty space.

How do I know if I haven’t rotated enough? Two questions will answer that:

1. Are your feet pointed at the Aggressor? If so then you are not rotated enough, and the tendency is to then move in the direction of your feet which will be into the Aggressor’s structure and base making the next move a fight.
2. Are you looking at the Aggressor? This one may sound weird, but we tend to move to what we are looking at. My friend Rick Bottomley worked in Africa for a while and once when travelling on a road he saw one single tree, no other trees anywhere, AND a Land Rover that had crashed into it. How do you run into the one tree in the entire landscape? You’re looking at it thinking by looking at it you will avoid it and the opposite is true. If you are looking right at the Aggressor, then you are not only likely also facing them but your next move will be into their structure rather than empty space, again making the next move a fight.

This is the first thing we must get right – avoid the attack. We do so by conditioning in that rotation off the line of the attack. Make sure you have rotated so that your feet are NOT pointed at the Aggressor but into empty space. Don’t look back at the Aggressor, look where you want to go next.
Rotating far enough then makes the next tactic work without a fight.

More coming.

Please send any questions you have on the book’s content, I would be glad to address all questions.

http://wpd-rc.com/blog/knife-defence-is-tough-so-getting-it-right-is-important/
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:30 pm

I am happy to view any video clips of your training with the book material to comment or help out in any way I can. You can post them to me on FB or put them on YouTube and email me at wpd-rc@hotmail.com. If you’re not familiar with YouTube you can code your clips as “unlisted” and then only those you give the link to can view them if you would rather they be private and not public.

This clip covers the information given in writing on my last post.

Video clip for those who have my book, “Watch Out For The Pointy End”
Tactic 1: Avoid while intercepting the attack.
AVOID = Rotate
You must rotate all the way to face Empty Space

https://youtu.be/6csG9SdZjFY
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:44 pm

The Knife Defence Drills build the needed skills and conditioning

My knife defence book “Watch Out For The Pointy End” takes you through a learning process. It is not enough to simply hand you a technique to deal with the trauma of a knife assault you must also have the skills and principles to make that technique (or any technique) work.

The book contains two distinct types of drill:

1. Micro Moment Skill Set Drills
2. Operant Conditioning Drills

Micro Moment Skill Set Drill:

In the middle of chaos there are moments of opportunity and moments of necessity. Being able to take the right action in those moments requires skill. The way I approach that is to isolate those moments and focus on the skills needed. There are a number of these types of drills in the book each delivering a tool to work the skills. If those skills are not worked then you will struggle or fail later when testing against fast all out assaults.

The point of course is not to neglect those skill set drills and work them until you are very comfortable with them. Once you have them then you can leave them and only work them occasionally or when needed to sharpen those skills. The reason for this is that they are just a moment and while vital you don’t want to let the drill that drags that moment out in time to become thought of as defending against a knife. They aren’t, they are simply drills to gain a skill.

Operant conditioning Drills:

Once you have learned the technique and worked the skill set drills and begun to understand the principles required then you need to take them to the next level to build the tactical habits required to survive a knife assault. You must build responses to set cues. Habits work very simply there is a cue and you respond. This is different from the OODA loop (Observe, Orientate, Decide and Act).

The book also has a number of drills to condition certain factors: dealing with left or right-hand assaults, proper structure etc. but the main response is the first tactic in both the Distancing Tactic Set and the Closing Tactic Set: Avoid while intercepting the attack. If you are not stabbed in that first instance of the ambush, then you have the opportunity to fix things.

The book also gives you how to condition for that ambush when assault from behind, for either side and if take completely by surprise from the front.

This is the reason the book approaches knife defence the way it does, there is one initial response to an ambush which means there are no multitude of techniques to decide from. And, if you follow the book, you can build that one response for a grab and assault from any angle on you. It will not matter which hand they are grabbing you with or which has the weapon the moment you are touched either by a grab, or worse a stab, you will know how to respond with that one initial tactic. The simplicity of that singular response is what transfers to Operant Conditioning well.

The technique, the skills and the principles are the foundation, but the operant conditioning must be worked until it is habit.


http://wpd-rc.com/blog/the-knife-defenc ... ditioning/
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Sun Nov 19, 2017 6:49 am

I don’t know who wrote the second review of my book “Watch Out For The Pointy End” but I truly appreciate it – thank you.

5 out of 5 stars: Definitely Worth Reading: I've studied martial arts for years and still learned a lot about knife attacks I didn't know. I just wish I had this book when I first started training.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Sat Nov 25, 2017 4:33 pm

WOW I just passed the 100 books sold mark for “Watch Out For The Pointy End” with a couple of more sales in the UK!

I have to say I am really pleased because, as Rory Miller says in the introduction, I am not well known, and I simply didn’t expect to sell this many and certainly not in a few months

I am also making a number of international sales in the UK, France and other places in Europe which is very gratifying.

Thank you to those who wrote the two reviews as I am certainly along with an introduction from Rory those help people make the decision to buy.

Reviews help a great deal.

Thank you all who bought the book and remember you can always contact me with questions.

Thank you to my daughter BD Wilson for her editing and Chris Beaton for the great photos.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 25, 2017 5:21 pm

Glad the book is doing well, Rick...I think it is chock full of concepts valid even against unarmed attacks.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 50701
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Rick Wilson » Sun Nov 26, 2017 3:21 am

Thank you, Van.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 543
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: My Knife Defence Book is ready for sale

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 26, 2017 7:09 am

Welcome Rick. I am also waiting for your next book about fighting your way back up from the ground.

I think that in general most of us will be 'dog meat' in a fight that goes to the ground as any skills we may feel we have inbred from the practice of standing techniques is at best very marginal.

It is of course true that we don't want to 'invite' a fight to the ground as we don't know what's on the ground to begin with...how we will impact the ground ...what weight bearing will be upon us as we hit the ground multiplying the 'splat factor' and what injuries will the landing produce in our muscles/bones/joints...that will imprison us on the ground...as well as who will be the opponent or multiple opponents putting their weight and boots to you.

As Rory even puts it...there will be times when you will be forced to the ground in many ways hard to foresee.

We see many dreamers in class who just will not accept the fact that no matter the skills they may have, they will not be able to block/fight/bigger/ stronger opponents, and even their hits to the 'right targets' will be shrugged off by a number of people...same as people absorbing lots of lead [pistol bullets] before they stop trying to kill you.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 50701
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Previous

Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

cron