Book Recommendations

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Sun Aug 30, 2020 6:13 pm

Book Recommendations Part 6: Self Defence is about violence, so we need to know all about that dark topic.

Up next is yet another book by Rory Miller “Facing Violence: Preparing For The Unexpected.”

Yes, Rory shows up a lot in my recommendations because he has put out some excellent and much needed information.

Self Defence is dealing with violence, either by avoiding it or surviving it.

To properly prepare for violence requires a study of what it is and how it happens in the real world. Violence is a huge topic with many different slices of the same pie and no matter what your experience there are lots of slices you will not have dealt with.

However, just because it is a really big topic doesn’t mean there are not characteristics, we can study to help us know what we are dealing with and help provide strategies and tactics.

Rory’s book takes a long hard look at violence and is the best book I have found to help prepare anyone in a study of violence and it does so through a logic rational approach giving you models to work with.

If we want ourselves and our students to be prepared to defend themselves then we owe it ourselves and our students to understand as much about violence as we can to give us the highest percentage chance of avoiding it or surviving it.

For a good read and practical knowledge on the subject of violence I highly recommend this book.


NOTE: Honorable mention for “The Little Black Book of Violence: What Every Young man Needs to Know About Fighting” by Lawrence A. Kane and Kris Wilder.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Van Canna » Sun Aug 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Great post, Rick, and so well put. The book 'Facing violence' is a God send indeed, and it should be mandatory reading by all martial artists, in particular because of the many slices of violence as you point out and the average practitioner really not knowing what he doesn't know.

As good as the book is, I have run into some Uechi people who said 'not necessary for me'...

This continues to reinforce the delusion ... a fundamental fallacy consisting in an expectation that some magical sword has knighted them with unassailable powers against any 'slice of violence' that dares to be served upon them.

Like the great tournament karate 'fighter' who felt no compunctions about taking up with he Jamaican gang banger's ex girl friend [of recent break up]...while knowing he was being hated and stalked because of it.

You have read my account of the investigation I performed....where the hapless karate champion was brutally assassinated having had his head cut off in an ambush in the dark stairway of the building where he had found himself in the wee hours of the night leaving her apartment.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 57245
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Van Canna » Sun Aug 30, 2020 9:42 pm

Rick writes
To properly prepare for violence requires a study of what it is and how it happens in the real world. Violence is a huge topic with many different slices of the same pie and no matter what your experience there are lots of slices you will not have dealt with.


And also has written in the past that acts of violence do not happen in a vacuum...there will be many a price to pay, win or lose.

Being a champion martial artist or just an assiduous practitioner, has sometimes the tendency of 'fogging the brain' making one wanting to step into the open jaws of a crocodile believing the BS of past lore.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 57245
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Mon Aug 31, 2020 6:36 pm

Great comments, Van.

Book Recommendations Part 7: Don’t go broke doing what you love

My next two books are directed to those wanting to earn from the teaching of self defence.

The fist book is one I really wished I had back when I opened and was running my school: “Selling Out To Your Level Of Comfort” By Randy King.

Randy King is the owner and operator of KPC Self Defense in Edmonton and he has been very successful at it. This book walks you through a number of processes and thought processes you need to be successful. While Randy uses his experience in opening and running a self defence school the information would apply to any business operation.

When I was running my school there were many professional programs for how to be successful, but they all were along one line and that line was not something I wanted to do. Randy’s book allows you to explore what you are willing to do and not willing to do – finding your level of comfort.

In my main income earning profession, I saw many times where a person was truly skilled in their field but were failing terribly on the business side. I think that is why this book resonated with me. It is an easy read but gives so much.

Take for example sales. All those “professional” programs back in my days presented sales almost like something you needed to do to trap the potential clients. Get them in a room and sign their six year old up for a five year contract. Not only couldn’t I do it but I felt that was an immoral approach. If you do it fine but I couldn’t. Randy presented sales so differently. He asks if you enjoy talking about martial arts or self defence and if you love to pass on your enthusiasm… that is all sales is. Talk about what you love and be infectious with your enthusiasm because that is honest.

He has practical worksheets you need to do to get where you want as well and I wish I had this book back when so if you want to do what you love for a living without coming to hate what you love – get and use this book.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Mon Aug 31, 2020 6:38 pm

Book Recommendations Part 8: Don’t let creeps wreck the experience for a student or wreck your business

My next book is one I feel should be mandatory reading for everyone wanting to run a school or teach seminars, particularly men. In fact, all men should read it regardless of whether they want to earn money with self defence or even train self defence. The book is: Creepology: Self Defense for your social life” By Anna Valdiserri.

I have to say after reading this book I felt pretty stupid and naïve and for a person who promotes awareness as part of self defence I was so ignorantly unaware of this topic.

After I read the book I talked to my wife and other women about the topic and they all went “Well yeah we deal with that all the time.” Women know all about it; however, women should read this book too because it provides strategies to deal with the creeps.

The question that bothered me so much was how the hell was I so ignorant? It was because these creeps like to fly under our radar, they hide it and use sleazily means to justify their actions. Many times other men haven’t seen what the creep is doing (they pick their times) or the creep is very good at taking something normal just more enough to get weird.

What is a creep? A creep is a person who doesn’t commit any crimes but makes women feel uncomfortable or creeped out. They do it for a number of reasons, mostly because they like it and often because they like how it disturbs and affects the women.

Too many examples in the book to go through but now I watch if a guy gives a woman (unrelated to them) a hug. Is it an A-frame hug? Is it too close and how comfortable is the woman really?

These creeps often justify their actions with comments like “I was just joking, she just can’t take a joke” or “if I was Brad Pitt, they’d love it.” BUT when they make these comments, they are also admitting they know they are making the woman uncomfortable and they are doing it anyway because they don’t care. They are making excuses and trying to minimize what the woman is experiencing and turn the men in the group against the woman – making it her over reaction not the creep’s responsibility.

The author notes there is a difference between a socially awkward person and a creep. When a socially awkward person does something that makes a woman uncomfortable and is asked to stop – they do. They creep won’t but often they try to appear to the other guys as just a socially awkward character.

Particularly in a self defence school where often the students are up close and personal you must provide a safe place to do dangerous things and a creep can ruin that. A creep will make the women feel very uncomfortable and it can affect the culture of the groups. Watch out for brush off comments of “oh that is just Fred being Fred….” No Fred is being a creep and it is just plain wrong, and you need to deal with it and make sure it ends. That often means tossing the creep out because they have been doing this a long time and don’t want to stop or they would have the last time they were confronted. A final note, if you knowingly allow it to go on you are giving approval and that could have a financial cost to your business, so for moral and ethical and practical reasons be aware and deal with the creeps.

This was an eye-opening book for me, so I highly recommend it – don’t run a school without having read it (just my advice.)
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Van Canna » Mon Aug 31, 2020 11:32 pm

Excellent Rick..we have had 'cyber-creeps' as well, as you will remember. They are ubiquitous...or the most part they turn out to be useless in all they do or have ever done.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 57245
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:06 pm

Book Recommendations Part 9: Back to Reality – How much force should I use?

Yes, a trip back to reality and back to Rory Miller (and Lawrence A. Kane) before moving on to skill sets and other aspects. I think to wrap up (for now) this reality section my next recommendation is spot on: “Scaling Force: Dynamic decision-making under the threat of violence.”

My previous recommendations have covered a great deal so I wanted to round off my self defence recommendations with this book because I think it brings together and ties in the information previously covered.

Scaling Force is deals with making the decision in chaos about how much force you can and should use to protect yourself and others. It also gives some practical ideas of how to do that.

I think it is pretty clear I am a fan of Rory Miller but there is reason for that. His material is well written, well thought out and practical as hell. This book he has done with Lawrence Kane is another example of great information.

This is one of those books that should help you tailor your training or teaching to be far more realistic. If you have followed my recommendations, you will see this book brings in all that has come before and uses that foundation to present other thoughts on what to do physically as well. How you do that would depend on what system and principles you practice, much of the information is not style or system specific.

Another thing to note is that some of Rory’s books have DVDs on them as well: Facing Violence and Scaling force are two of them.

I will have more of Rory’s books to recommend and why but get this one.

Next, I will shift aspects of training a little with my recommendations.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:07 pm

Book Recommendations Part 10: It is not what you do but how you do it.

I believe in principle based study over technique, although some of the recommendations that will follow will be books on techniques but for me it is always what is underneath the technique that I value. So, let me start this section off with a book totally on principles: “The Book of Martial Power: The Universal Guide To The Combative Arts” by Steven Pearlman.

You don’t have to agree or accept all the universal principles presented in this book but each of them is deserving of deep study and contemplation.

The book covers a large number of principles and most of them very well. Most of them will be applicable regardless of style or system you study – which is why they are universal principles.

The author covers principles of theory, physiokinetic principles, principles of technique, principles of philosophy and ends with a sample of techniques. A strong coverage of excellent principles.

Principles can make what you are already doing work better, work more efficiently and work more effectively. This book is very worthy of study.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:09 pm

Book Recommendations Part 11: Let’s put them on the ground.

The ground is a very effective tool to hit a person with, but we also have to know how to do it so that we have some control over the damage. We don’t wand to smash a person’s head into the ground and find that the legal system feels making a person incapacitated for life by a brain injury is not justified. That requires a true knowledge of how to hit a person with the ground.

I am going to alter what I have done previously to recommend two books in this one post on the principles of a takedown.

“Principles, Analysis and Applications of Effortless Combat Throws” by Tim Cartmell

And

“The Science of Takedowns, Throws & Grapping for Self-Defense” BY Martina Sprague.

My favourite of the two is the book by Tim Cartmell but I have to admit the presentation might be a little dry for some, but the information is exceptional. Once again, I am interested in the underlying principles presented over any of the techniques demonstrated. I know some have had issues with the entries to do the takedowns etc. but I don’t care because there are entries to get to those positions or more so they appear as gifts in the midst of chaos, but you have to know how to take advantage of them.

So much solid information about the principles of a takedown presented by Tim Cartmell that I cannot recommend this book enough.

Martina Sprague’s book also looks right at the principles used in a takedown. While techniques are also shown in this book… well you have to use techniques to illustrate the principles, but the important thing to take away from this book are the principles she has illustrated. Recalling a specific takedown in the midst of chaos requires thought and yeah sure you can do a takedown enough it becomes a trained habit but if it is the principles that you bring deep into yourself then you will see the opportunities for a takedown when offered even if the takedown you do looks nothing like any of them in the book – what made it work was in the book so look for it.

I think takedowns are an important tool to have in your toolbox for self defence and when you know deeply how they work then you will see them when they are offered so check out these books.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Wed Sep 02, 2020 8:48 pm

Book Recommendations Part 12: Something a little different with a lot to teach if you look for it.

This one is more for instructors designing courses or seminars, but fun for everyone.

I just posted a couple of excellent books giving details on a specific topic. I want to change gears for this post and show what can be done with very little. Too often, for me, I see courses going for breadth over depth and that is fine but sometimes it is helpful to look closer at what you already have for something that can be taught.

I am going to put this disclaimer out because I see a great deal in this small book, but others have not seen what I do. So, you may or may not get what I did from this book.

The book is: “Hadaka-Jime: The Core Technique for Practical Unarmed Combat” By Moshe Feldenkrais.

Moshe Feldenkrais is best known for his “mind-body” method but he was also a Jujitsu practitioner who became one of the first European Judo black belts after he met Dr. Kano. In 1940 after the Nazi invasion of France he escaped to England and became a science officer in the British Admiralty where he conducted anti-submarine research in Scotland from 1940 to 1945. During his time in the British army he taught Judo to officers and soldiers on the base. He was asked to create a course that could teach effective self defence for war time and teach it in the shortest time possible – 10 hours. Yes, just ten hours.

To design the course he chose Judo (his base) because “Judo does not teach so many tricks, but rather inculcates in the mind and body a special sense of balance and action enabling the body to react to an unforeseen attack, smoothly , swiftly and in the most efficient way.”

He chose to focus on one technique only, Hadaka-Jime or a naked arm strangulation. By picking one technique, he allowed the trainee to learn to believe in that technique and know if they could just get to it, they would be fine. And he taught you can get there many different ways.

He designed the course so that even though it was only ten hours the trainee performed that one technique thousands of times.

He considered this a first aide course.

For me if you look at the program you will see “that the specific technique becomes secondary to the more important learning process.”

This book had a strong influence on my knife defence book “Watch Out For The Pointy End.” I designed my course to focus on one response to a knife assault. If you can initiate that one move, then you will succeed. Now after that one move there are more options, so this is where it differed from Feldenkrais’ book.

I also saw that the Feldenkrais book managed to teach a number of principles while it taught how to get to that core technique even though those principles were never talked about. I thought that was brilliant and in the early drafts of “Watch Out For The Pointy End” I tried to accomplish that very subtle teaching and failed horribly. Thanks to honest feedback from Rory Miller, Rick Bottomley and Randy King I “showed the magic” as Rory suggested and the book turned out much better.

The reason I am recommending this book is because if you are designing courses or seminars or even trying to create a self defence approach, I feel this book has a great deal to teach if you look between the lines and read closely.

I honestly don’t know if others will see the same thing, I have been told my mind works differently when I analyse self defence material but I have to recommend this small intense book if for nothing else for historical enjoyment value and for how much I got out of it.

Sadly, I think the paperback version is not available right now but there is a Kindle version and it is available on Kindle Unlimited (fee if you are a member.) I just had a look and while the pictures are a little small it works.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Van Canna » Thu Sep 03, 2020 4:05 am

Like I said, Rick, one hell of a great thread...showing there is so much out there to learn.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 57245
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Thu Sep 03, 2020 5:16 pm

Book Recommendations Part 13: Speaking of the ground – know what you are doing so you can get back up

I am hoping once this virus thing is under control to get back to writing my book on Ground Fighting for self defence which is all about how to get back to your feet. Even though I recommend highly not staying on the ground in a self defence situation I also highly recommend making a study of ground grappling. The reason is two-fold, first so you know what you are doing, and can more easily control what is happening to enable you to get up and second so you know what they aggressor is doing. If they took you to the ground, they want you there so do your best to know what is going on.

There are a lot of BJJ books which cover ground grappling extremely well, but I am only going to par down that to one BJJ book recommended and one from a Chin Na or Chinese base. As always you will see they are pretty similar since they handle the same topic.

I recommend “Jiu-Jitsu University” by Saulo Ribeiro with Kevin Howell as my BJJ recommendation.

And

I recommend “Chin Na In Ground Fighting: Principles, Theory and Submission Holds for All Martial Styles” by Al Arenault and Joe Faulise for the Chinese approach.

Riberiro’s book is a big book covering pretty much all you would need for an exceptional foundation in ground grappling. The book progresses from Survival to Escapes to The Guard to Guard Passing to Submissions. The book has excellent pictures covering what you shouldn’t do and what you should do. The principles are discussed, the explanations are clear and accompanied by clear illustrations.

There are so many books out there on BJJ so unless you have a favourite practitioner or branch, I highly recommend this book as your starting point (it may be all you ever need.)

The Chin Na book begins with general concepts – the history and principles, then the science of technique, pressure points and body tools are next, then joint locks arms, legs neck and body and ends with fighting sequences.

This book is also very clear on what and why they want you do to and has great pictures as well. It gives a very comprehensive foundation for what can be done on the ground.

There is 44 pages devoted to pressure points which is interesting, and some will really enjoy. On the ground definitely you can access these points and if you are interested in that area of study then this book has enough details. I guess I always think of pressure points as something to add on not rely on. Regardless the book explains what you should do and why.

I like recommending these two because they come from very different styles and yet there is not a lot different if you look at the relevant presentations. Both are excellent reference material.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Van Canna » Thu Sep 03, 2020 5:51 pm

Great post Rick. You might recall my covering this book in great detail about 20 yrs ago on my page. It was a very successful book and a great number of karate students, women in particular, really went for it. Of course Uechi men are "fearless" :D reason why they don't buy it.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 57245
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Fri Sep 04, 2020 4:38 pm

Book Recommendations Part 14: Principles and play

Okay so I had intended this to be a series on book recommendations, but I am going to break that guideline for this post (may do so again but not often) to recommend a DVD. Yes, a DVD, as far as I know it is not available in a download form (something to consider Rory.)

My last two books certainly provide why things work but they are heavy into techniques as will some books in future posts but what I want to recommend here is a different approach - one that focuses on the principles and learning through active play.

I recommend: “Joint Locks: Learn to improvise joint locks under pressure.” By Rory Miller. Yes, Rory again – get used to it.

I have done Rory’s seminar on joint locks and I love his approach. Okay, it may be because it resonates with a lot of my own beliefs but its also is solid work.

The DVD walks through the seminar showing how joint locks work (giving you the principles) and then focuses on drills that train how to improvise joint locks in action. Joint locks can be something people have a hard time doing in action. I agree with Rory that the reason for this may just be how joint locks are taught.

My personal belief is one I think Rory would agree with is that joint locks are gifts. It is rude to try and take a gift before it is offered, and it is rude to turn a gift down when it is offered.

Too often people try to “get” a lock and fail to see when one is offered or see the opportunity too late. This video gets its and will help you if you’ve had no training in locks and will help you if you do, although you may have to empty your cup.

Great training and great information.

If you want to add locks into your training or you want to play with what you have already learned, then I highly recommend this DVD training.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Sun Sep 06, 2020 5:55 am

Book Recommendations Part 15: Yes, techniques are still useful learning tools

I am still convinced that we need to know the why to make things work in chaos when things can go wrong but that doesn’t mean a good book with clear techniques can’t teach us things. My next recommendation is just that, a book of techniques that are clearly explained and can hold a great deal of learning.

I am recommending: “No Holds Barred Fighting – The Clinch: Offensive and Defensive Concepts Inside NHB’s Most Grueling Position” by Mark Hatmaker.

Mark Hatmaker has a number of books out and they are all worth a read.

The clinch is an up close and personal position which makes it applicable to assaults and Mark covers this position very well.

The book starts with a number of skill sets required for the techniques presented, then it goes into striking within the clinch, the clinch takedowns, countering clinch takedowns, and ends with the back cast.

The details of how each technique is to be done are clear and concise and well illustrated.

While the book is focused on techniques if you look at what is being done you can see and learn a great deal more than the techniques.

When I was looking for techniques to illustrate the use of empty space in self defence for my book “Now You See It, Now You Don’t: Using empty space in self defence” I used one of this book’s techniques because they all make excellent use of empty space.

While techniques aren’t my thing, if you would like to learn more about what can be done in the clinch then this is an excellent recourse.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

PreviousNext

Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

cron