Book Recommendations

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Sat Sep 19, 2020 3:24 am

You can read the review or watch the video clip: https://youtu.be/ozKLvbEtXSw

This is Book Recommendations Part 23: Something new and a must have – Randy King’s New on-line Violence Foundations course.

Yes, an on-line course I kind of broke the “just books” recommendations when I recommend Rory Miller’s DVDs.

I am highly recommending: “Realities of Violence Educational Foundations” by Randy King of KPC Self Defense here in Edmonton, Randy King Live and Talking to Savages.

I have said it before if you want to train for self defence then that requires a study of violence. There is a different violence dynamic when you are dealing with a group. A resource predator wants different things than a process predator. We need to look at what it is, why it is, how it happens and how that affects you – personally and legally. We can’t deal with something unless we know something about it and the more, we know the better equipped to deal with it we are.

Randy King’s has done a fantastic job creating this very professional quality course. The course is all about the soft skills of self defence, a study of violence realities, which means the stuff we should know beyond the physical conflict. Beyond that really fun stuff we all love to focus training on. Because it is not the physical stuff that means this course is not style or system specific.

The course is broken out into seven modules and each module is broken up into small manageable pieces which I found very useful because when I got a free moment, I could complete a section and then go look after other things. The pieces are short but densely packed with information. I loved the progression of information and the logic of it. I liked Randy included video clips of real violence which helped solidify the knowledge being shared.

I believe this course is for everyone.

You may a long-time practitioner and are comfortable with your knowledge and skill level. But even if you have a comfortable level of knowledge in violence this course has the most current information I have come across. It can add to what you know, it can reinforce what you know. It can update what you know.

If you are training a traditional martial art or at a self defence school or an MMA facility and you love the training, but they are not covering this much needed material on the realities of violence. You can cover this vital material without having to change where you love to train.

As an instructor we need to accept that no one person can know all aspects of self defence. The soft skills of violence foundations may not be part of your traditional style or system curriculum, or your research focus. Now it doesn’t have to. This course can give you a solid foundation in Violence Foundations and that may enrich what you are already teaching. You can recommend this course to your students, so they get your great training and this great training. You my even want to take it a step farther and make this course mandatory for your students, or even a requirement to obtain a certain rank or certificate. Do that and I’d bet you could workout a student discount with Randy….

I say well done Randy King and thank you for creating this fantastic informative course – I cannot stress the need to know this material enough and now you have another exceptional way to access it.

Find Randy King’s New Course here: https://www.randykinglive.com/onlinetraining
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Mon Sep 21, 2020 5:03 pm

Book Recommendations Part 24: Where principles and reality combine with teaching.

Back to Rory Miller again where he offers a massive gift of how to approach principle-based teaching:

“Principles-Based INSTRUCTION For Self Defense (and maybe life)” By Rory Miller.

I truly believe that if you understand why things work you have a far better chance to make things work in the middle of chaos.

The old give a person a fish you feed them for a day, teach them to fish feed them for life.

Teach a person a technique helps them in one situation, teach them the principles and help them in multiple situations.

It is important to apply the title when forming expectations for this book. This is “principles-based” INSTRUCTION for SELF-DEFENSE. So yes, the book will get into principle based material but it will be focused on teaching using a principle based approach. Also, the focus is on self defence so the first two section (about 49 pages) is devoted to Rory discussing self defence.

This book is about how to teach a person to fish – instruction; however, even if you do not instruct this book will give you a great deal. I also think everyone who trains also teaches because we work with and help each other and that is teaching.

If you want to shift from a technique based teaching / training then this book is for you. Remember this doesn’t mean you change “what” you teach but it may adjust “how” you teach it.

If you want to shift what you do to principle based you can use this book as well.

Another great book by Rory Miller.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Fri Sep 25, 2020 5:51 pm

Book Recommendations Part 25: More principles and ways to train them.

I am going to return to another author previously recommended for this one:

“Cheng Hsin T’ui Shou: The Art of Effortless Power” by Peter Ralston.

The first couple of chapters deal with the principles of Cheng Hsin. He then follows with a chapter on “A Consideration of Ability:” This paragraph describes what the author tries to bring about in this chapter: “What we need in order to create ability is freedom from how we presently think and relate to the matter of ability. Beyond this freedom we require an understanding of how ability comes about – in anybody. Then we must align with this, by moving our thinking, experience, and action to a ‘place’ that accesses ability, or creates a completely new way of being hat naturally realizes ability – probably both.”

After that he moves into the techniques of Cheng Hsin and the rest of the book focuses on the techniques but it is important to note that much like my book on using empty space for self defence “Now You See It, Now You Don’t” the techniques are merely delivery systems for the principles and the principles used are what should be focused on when looking at what is being trained by the techniques.

This book is a great follow up to his first book because you get to see examples of the use of the principles but remember that the printed page can only show so much.

An excellent book and one I think is best read after his first book: “Cheng Hsin: The Principles of Effortless power” previously recommended.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Mon Sep 28, 2020 3:50 pm

Book Recommendations Part 26: Okay but how do I train all that?

I am sure everyone who has been reading these will be shocked that my next book is another one by Rory Miller: Training For Sudden Violence: 72 Practical Drills.”

Eventually I will run out of Rory books but expect to see a few more.

My recommendations have included a lot of self defence focused books and sometimes we sit back with this knowledge and go so how do I train parts of that? Creating drills take a certain skill and creativity. A little help with that doesn’t hurt.

Rory has written a book that contains 72 practical drills that he has created and tested in seminars, You can take these drills and work them and you can also apply your own creativity in adapting them to your style or system when it comes to the physical side.

Keeping classes fresh is a good business strategy. Giving your students something to bring together and apply what has been taught is very effective instruction.

Not to mention that these are a lot of fun to do. You learn a great deal from them and have a fantastic time doing them. I say this having done pretty much all of them in Rory’s seminars, so this is firsthand information. And if you can’t get to a Rory Miller seminar then you can at least get his notes.

As always there is a nice logical progression through the material: Evaluating Drills, then starts with a great drill – “One Step” so recently misunderstood on the net (no surprise there), blindfold drills, dynamic fighting, fundamentals, ground movement, plastic mind (one of my favourites), Internal work, Combat drills, World Work, and finishes with discussions of sparring and competition, and tricks and one-offs.

With 72 drills to pick from you are sure to find ones that work with what you teach or train.

This book is a treasure trove of excellent drills so if you have been looking for ways to train this self defence stuff or simply add fresh material to your classes then why not go with the best. I highly recommend this book.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:28 pm

Book Recommendations Part 27: The Bad Old Days

Okay this one is because I love the author and it is fun to look through the collection of very painful submission holds. If you ever get to see the video that accompanied it, you will know what I mean. It is now hard to find at a cheap price and you really need to be a bit of a MA nerd because the cheapest I saw was around $35 for an acceptable used copy (159 pages.)

The descriptions are not as clear as some I see now but the pictures are clear, and you can easily figure out all that is going on. Some of the odd holds should inspire how you can make things work no matter what.

The book is by the legend Gene LeBell: “Grappling Master: Combat For Street Defense and Competition”

The book is broken into 12 chapters: Grabbing you own hands for hugging and squeezing, the LeBell slap and catch, pressure against the back, neck locks and cranks, rib crushing, chokes and neck holds, leverage against the wrist joint and finger locks, abdominal pain, arm, elbow and shoulder locks, ankle, knee, groin stretches and hip locks and finally a garb bag of submissions.

So pretty much a bunch of ways to crank and bend and break every part of the human body.

Once again if you are a grappling fan and like to cover all bases then this is a book for you. If you are an MA nerd and like to see pretty much anything including the things that have moved us along this journey, then this book is for you. If it was available for cheaper then it would be for all.

For those who might not know Gene LeBell was Bruce Lee’s grappling instructor, and of course there is that Stephen Seagal story….
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: Book Recommendations

Postby Rick Wilson » Tue Oct 06, 2020 8:39 pm

Book Recommendations Part 28: For the diehard curious ones

This next book is for those who just love to know more about martial arts. You will not learn any techniques or martial principles just history and context but a very real history and context stripped of the common BS that is built in martial arts because some feel they require myths and legends as truth to make their art viable.

The book is: “Chinese Martial Arts Training manuals: A Historical Survey” By Brian Kennedy and Elizabeth Guo.

The book is broken into two parts.

Part One Background: The sources, an overview, a caveat about the history, Historians, Stories, classifications, military examinations, history of the training manuals, authorship, keeping traditional alive, translation problems and perils, how did martial artists make a living and Taiwan martial arts history.

Part Two – The books. The books covered range from older 1500’s to earlier 1900’s. they range from those that set the bar to those meant for the state and military and those that may just have spread myths and legends as truth. There is only a few pages describing the author and the contents of each book and the relevance to martial arts history. Many have some of the pictures or illustrations from the manual as well.

No, this book does not have the manuals themselves (it would be a massive book if it did) but as a person who enjoys any martial knowledge this history is interesting.

If when reading a book on Chinese martial arts, you enjoy the sections on the practitioners, their lives, their study of the art and the history of whatever style is being covered then you will enjoy this book.
Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/
User avatar
Rick Wilson
 
Posts: 608
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:43 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Previous

Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests

cron