KISS

"The title is "Explosive Uechi-ryu" and the moderator is Arthur Rabesa. Art will be exploring the power contained in Uechi-ryu that is not appreciated by the average practitioner. Make no mistake - this forum is for the serious martial artist and I wholeheartedly recommend it for anyone who really wants to tap his or her explosive power potential.

Moderator: Art Rabesa

KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Sun Nov 02, 2014 6:02 pm

Yup---keep it simple. Try not to be a master of none. Keep your training within your limits. Develop strong, fast, hard hitting, strikes. if your not competing any more gear it down. Think about shorter, fast strikes. Work on accurate strikes as well. You're not trying to win the match any longer. You're trying to get rid of this bad guy.I always say ,that I'm pretty sure I can not go three rounds any more, but I'll give you 20 or 30 seconds of sheer hell. That is what I work on. SO-- work on what you are comfortable with. Just do it fast and hard. -----Happy Trails ----- Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Thu Nov 26, 2015 3:59 am

I thought I'd drag this post out of the dust. It's something I strongly believe in. We talk of self defense and being able to protect ourselves quite often. There is no true set method of being able to do that. Our training simply gives us a better chance of handling our self. So don't clutter up your training, with things that your probably not going to turn to when the crap hits the fan. Keep it simple. Train hard on fast hard hitting strikes that get the job done. Sparring is always a good part of the training to take part in. Competitive fighting is something I did tons of. When I retired from it, I concentrated on developing straight forward very hard strikes. If you develop the muscle memory for short, fast, powerful strikes, you'll be tough to handle. Your mind isn't cluttered with a lot of different techniques. Train to turn your kicks into low powerful leg thrusts. These thrusts really take off and explode into the lower half of the body, dealing out a lot of damage. Keep your hand strikes short and fast. Concentrate on firing your hands, elbows, forearm, into areas that will cause the most damage. Your not in a competitive match any longer. This is not for any trophy my friend. There's no officials or rules out here. So your techniques are now no nonsense. This is how you train. On the training pads and bags of course. Can't hit anybody with these things. Everything else in the training remains the same. All the kata's, kumite's, drills. With one exception. Your practice now includes these no nonsense strikes. Make them fast, because where there's speed, there is power. KISS is what it's all about if you want a better chance of getting rid of that bad guy. --------Happy Trails -------Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Sun Nov 29, 2015 3:53 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJTr9Epoue0 -----------------------------This is a little of what I mean by keeping it simple. Working on getting in, and then going to work. You'll never see this in formal competitive matches. Can not practice these strikes on a dojo mate however. Have to take it to the hitting equipment. I like practicing on BOB and the good ole heavy bag. Maintaining the grip tends to be the toughest part. Really practice your vice-like sanchin grip here. I do not want him to drift away from me once I'm in. My comfort zone is very close. I want to stay there. This is rather simple with no frills attached. Sure gets the job done though.-----Happy Trails---Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Fri Jan 08, 2016 5:16 pm

http://rabesauechiryu.com/leg-thrust-2/

When I say keep it simple, I don't actually mean what you practice is simple. It just means that there are no frills. No actual "technique" involved. Because you're not trying to cause any deception. You are simply firing strikes that are right up the chute, exploding into the body. The leg thrusts that I teach do just that. They set up the hands - elbows - ulna - radius- head - that will follow. These leg thrusts are very damaging, and very difficult to deal with by the bad guy. I work these leg thrusts more than anything else in my training. To stop an attack you must first shift that aggression your way. Deal out some destruction his way. We're talking about a few seconds here. A fast explosive burst. You will practice keeping your hands in the firing set up when firing these leg thrusts. Your hands will take off almost as the leg thrust hits. You must READ what is about to happen. Now ACT and not REACT. Take a look at the three leg thrusts I teach. The shin thrust can work better than the knee strike because of where it is heading, and it's accuracy. The front thrust and stomp thrust really explode quickly into the leg and pelvis. The shin thrust is the one that causes the biggest damage. The front thrust tends to be the fastest. The stomp thrust can really do a job on that front leg. The leg does not bend that way remember. So here are the three terrors you can deliver when needed. Work all the close quarter strikes in the web site coming off these leg thrusts. Hope you get something from this for your training - and teaching. ----Happy Trails----Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Tue Feb 09, 2016 2:39 pm

I've gathered up eight of my past students to get back into their training. Six are black belts with two brown belts. I gave up operating a school years ago. I got tired of all the traveling to teach and decided to stay home. I wrote about "concentrated teaching" on one of my threads. That's what I'll have with this group. The "kiss" concept will also apply. Most of these people are grand parents, or old enough to be grand parents. My teaching will be slightly different than they remember. No heavy banging as in their earlier years. More emphasis placed on traditional Uechi Ryu and keeping things simple. Simple, meaning pulling out the meaning of sanchin and it's overall benefits. Strong foundations with strong strikes and blocks in kata. Quick movements in attacking strikes. No actual fighting techniques needed. Because our competitive fighting days are behind us. Deceptive technique not needed. Just short, fast, strong strikes. Slight angles rather than stepping away. Lots of work on body mechanics, especially in the prearranged kumites. A big emphasis on the leg thrusts rather than kicks. I'll still teach fighting when I travel to other sites. That will always be what I'm known for and it will always be. Now--I'm making some adjustments. After all---we all have to get back to the grand kids in working order, don't we? Longevity. -------Happy Trails------Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 10, 2016 4:40 pm

Good stuff, Art. :)
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Re: KISS---TD

Postby Art Rabesa » Wed Feb 24, 2016 8:06 pm

To dismiss actual fighting technique from the curriculum makes things roll along very well. It certainly leaves lots of time to go over no-nonsense drills. Fighting technique is still a part of what I teach, just not for my private group. All past students coming off many years of not training. Now--I want to teach things that will cause a great deal of damage as quickly as possible. No technique needed here. Working on the strikes that are right there in your set up. To fire strikes from this 10&2 set up very fast and very hard. I have formed "TD" drills to do just that. The TD stands for Total Destruction. This all sounds like a plan doesn't it? Well, it's a work in progress. I know what I want to get done. Now, I hope my plan can be successful. Kata is always very important in my teaching. Lots of detailed training here. Moving from one segment to another smoothly with power. Now, I'm not so interested in the speed of the kata, but the crispness of each movement. Every stance being strong and stable. Every strike and block being crisp and strong. Sanchin training being the hub of the wheel. Moving the sanchin power into everything else we do. All this is what I have planned for this group. I'll experiment constantly with this small group. Like a mad scientist. I'm anxious to find out the things that are working. It's sort of another chapter in my longevity. It will give me another goal to reach. KISS is what it's all about. Makes teaching very interesting. Not knowing what will work, but finding what will. It's a plan. -------Happy Trails-----Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Sun Jul 03, 2016 2:58 pm

I try to allow about 45 minutes at the end of my class for the big four. Shin thrust - front thrust - head punch - elbows. I'm going to limit this to only these strikes. In this way, I can get them to not have other techniques to concern themselves with. I'll keep it this way for X amount of time. If you can deliver the big four with speed and power, you'll be tough to deal with. Heavy bag set on the floor for the leg thrusts. Kicking bags for the elbow shots. Striking mitts for the head punches. Lots of work on kumite one and kyu kumite. Space awareness and slight angles with all blocks. Kata flow and one piece movements. After their long training lay off, I have to bring them along carefully. Working the big four will help anyone develop a strong presence. Even fighters should concentrate on the KISS principle. No nonsense strikes are what you want outside of the training hall. Just because you are a competitive fighter, it doesn't mean you can hit hard. Outside are individuals that will brush off those fighting techniques you practice. If you develop stopping power in the big four, you'll now have the complete package. Set aside a portion of the class for these power strikes. Nothing complicated about them, they just work. My class goes about two hours. It generally goes longer if I'm involved in something I want to get done. ------Happy Trails------Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jul 05, 2016 4:35 pm

Good post. It is the striking power that ends the problem, if the problem requires it.

If it requires it and we don't have it...oh well...

But easier said than done...something that really needs to be cultivated.
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Tue Jul 05, 2016 6:41 pm

Yup--it is easier said than done. Many aspects of the training come under that roof. However, when one makes it a normal part of the workout, it becomes the norm. I tell them that I want them to be able to hit hard. Therefore, we will constantly work on striking power. There is the right and wrong way to achieve hitting power. It's mechanics. It's muscle memory. We're not learning how to fight. We're learning how to hit. Strikes we can not do when sparring. Just a segment of the workout at the end of class. After all the kata - and pre arranged kumites - and conditioning. "Okay, time to hit". Out comes the 100 pound heavy bag and striking mitts. Getting their body into each strike and relating it to sanchin is the main activity. Spending "time on target" with all strikes becomes major. Leg thrusts to hit what ever is in their path. Not really looking for the foot or hand to get in. Blasting it into the body and hitting what ever you hit. Coming off the low hard leg thrusts with strong head shots. Nothing fancy here. Blue collar strikes that cause lots of damage. Yup-- easier said than done. Just have to keep working it. The striking power comes slowly, but it does come. Being able to hit hard is important. I can't see anyone disagreeing with that.------Happy Trails------Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Fri Jul 29, 2016 12:32 pm

While you're keeping things simple, make sure you're aware of other things. I certainly do not want my arm, or leg, to be twisted and locked out. All aspects of training are good. Everything that is taught, or could be taught, is good. Knowing everything may be a goal for some people. To accomplish this is remarkable. I applaud those that know everything. The "Mixed" part of MMA. I'm comfortable on the ground and do not mind being there. Staying with the "KISS" mind set is essential here as well. Striking on the ground is something to practice. Being able to hit hard on the ground is very important. In any self defense situation, going to the ground is a very good possibility. In working your power hitting, you'll find that you can strike from any position. This will take time but it can be done. Close quarter combat training is for anything close. I would say that being on the ground with that bad guy tends to be very close. Can't involve your legs or pelvis much in ground strikes, but there are ways to hit hard. Using the ground to aid your strikes is something to know. Looks like I have to get to work on a video lesson on this. Let's see if I can put something together. Keep an eye on "Art's Lesson" for Ground Striking. I guess I have to get to work on this. -------Happy Trails-----Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Sat Aug 27, 2016 1:18 pm

I did get a "Ground Striking" lesson filmed at Sensei Mattson's summerfest. Rob Buckland was good enough to assist me with this. Rob is a load and it added to the quality of the lesson. I'm waiting on the video and I'll post it as soon as I get it. In doing the video, it only brings out my belief in working the few strikes needed. You can have all the weapons in the world, but you can only use one at a time. When you find yourself on the ground, you dial up a chosen few strikes. These are the tight powerful strikes that will do the most damage. These strikes are on the lesson video. If I can not get this ground striking video, I'll put something together to show these ground strikes. This goes along with this topic of KISS. Keeping things simple when your dealing with putting him away. My belief is always to work those few short powerful strikes constantly. Work all strikes, but really concentrate on those that will absolutely get the job done. There's really only about 3 or 4 strikes I practice constantly. They're always there -- like breathing. As a teacher, I'll teach many strikes. My go to strikes as well. It's easy to detect my go to strikes when I demonstrate striking. KISS is something everyone should have in their overall training makeup. Those few strikes that are always with you. Keeping in mind---that you're not fighting --- you're defending yourself. Please know this important difference. When you have a thorough understanding of this, you'll now understand why KISS is so important. --------Happy Trails-------Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Sat Aug 27, 2016 2:56 pm

After I posted the message above, I went down to my tiny training area in my basement. I fired a few strikes at the heavy bag. The front leg thrust --elbow head strike --open hand head shot -- the shoken clavicle and hook shoken head shot. Okay, now I feel better. I guess I'd better tackle this list of chores my wife left me. Happy wife happy life. ------Happy Trails----Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Sat Oct 15, 2016 4:19 pm

In looking at all the above posts, there is one main theme. Know what you're comfortable with and what you are not. If I look at a class doing a traditional aspect of the training, they might all be doing okay. When I interject something different, there will be a percentage that will have difficulty. When I adjust it slightly, those having difficulty will find it easier to do. Point being that the objective is still being reached. I'll do this in the prearranged kumite's every now and then. Get the job done. Do it in your comfort mode. So-----when teaching "Self Defense", I like to individualize it to suit the student. Some are quicker - stronger - short -tall - etc. Very common in classes everywhere. "Okay - so rather than doing it this way, lets try it this way". Let them find what works for them. What they are comfortable doing. The normal traditional training remains fairly structured. This part of the training is outside the box. Individualized. Keeping things simple has never meant keeping things weaker. Actually, things become stronger because it is being done at your comfort level. This is why I like to teach "Hitting" rather than fighting. We all know the difference here. I'll still work those that like to spar. That'll always be there. I like to have a section of the workout devoted mainly to hitting. Usually at the end of the workout. I want them to have that mind set when the class ends. Know your strengths and weaknesses. That's a very good place to start.-------Happy Trails -----Art
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Re: KISS

Postby Art Rabesa » Fri Nov 11, 2016 4:25 pm

Is there a way to make the practice of Uechi Ryu easier? Well maybe ----just a little. Still lots of years and hard work involved, but lets see if we can take the guess work out of it. A family of many children. All have different personalities and skills. After all is examined and placed in order, we find one common denominator. Their roots. I analyze Uechi Ryu the same way. When teaching, I always bring it back to where everything comes from. The movements taught in the early stages of ones training, can be used later for a quicker understanding. When introducing a new kata, new stances, new strikes, new blocks, revert back to what they really are. I do not want students to confuse a new movement. Relating it to something they already know will speed up the learning process. Here is a simple example. This new kata that is being introduced, has a stance that hasn't been shown yet. We are moving from the sanchin stance into this new stance. The stance is called the "cat stance". Instead of going into the cat stance, simply teach it as going into another sanchin stance. This is easy because the student is comfortable with the sanchin stance. Once in the sanchin stance, have them simply lift the heal slightly on the front foot. It's a sanchin stance. You just lift the front foot. The deep stance (Horse stance) is the same teaching method. From the sanchin stance---just have them move the rear foot back a little. The hand position remains in sanchin when doing this. What is being accomplished, is simplifying the understanding. I like to remind them not to be confused when learning something new. It's simply sanchin being rearranged slightly. Blocks are the same. Hands in the sanchin position. All blocks stem from this set up. They will begin- pass through- end- in the sanchin hand position. The only thing that is taking place is arranging the hand position. The elbow pretty much remains in that sanchin set up. KISS is used here. To relate, and refer to past instruction, using sanchin as the guide line. Hopefully, they know that whatever is coming can easily be understood. Works for me. -----Happy Trails ------Art
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