ANALYZE KATA

"The title is "Explosive Uechi-ryu" and the moderator is Arthur Rabesa. Art will be exploring the power contained in Uechi-ryu that is not appreciated by the average practitioner. Make no mistake - this forum is for the serious martial artist and I wholeheartedly recommend it for anyone who really wants to tap his or her explosive power potential.

Moderator: Art Rabesa

ANALYZE KATA

Postby Art Rabesa » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:35 am

I can not take any credit for any of the infighting strikes I have. I stole all of them from the Uechi - Ryu kata's. I've always suspected that there were hidden gems in the uechi ryu movements. All you have to do is analyze them. Look at your kata carefully. All movements contain real meaning. At times, there may be a series of moves while maintaining one stance. This means that you could do any of the strikes contained in defending yourself. Many of the "blocks", or what you see as a block, could be a strike. Movements that might be looked at as flowing gracefully, or flowery, contain deadly strikes. There are MANY hidden elements in SANCHIN. Sanchin is mechanically simple. A step and a thrust. If you have followed any of my books or web site or videos, you know how much stock I put on sanchin training. When sanchin is really pulled apart and analyzed, the meaning becomes very clear. Now put that in the rest of the kata's and watch what happens. BOOM! Those wrist blocks and blocks from the "Cat stances", are not flowery any more. That is what I mean when I say that your kata's , "will take on a different look". -----SO, I took all those phantom movements from the kata's and practiced them as close quarter strikes. Where did the radial and ulna strikes come from? Go and find it. Look for them in the kata's - they're there. How do you hit so hard from so close? I took everything I do right from the uechi - ryu training. Do not let these important movements in the uechi - ryu system just lie there. Don't just move the air around when doing kata. Look closely. Do you see it??? -----Happy Trails ------Art
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Re: ANALYZE KATA close quarter

Postby Art Rabesa » Tue Feb 02, 2016 5:12 pm

When teaching infighting, I like to slip in kata movements. I might ask - "where might this strike be found in our kata"? After some thought, someone will eventually find it. The strike might be altered slightly depending on the position you're in. It may be performed slightly different in the kata because there is no actual attack. Although, one should do the kata as if an attack is coming . When you're actually dealing with another, the strike might be delivered from a different angle than in the kata. However, that strike is right out of a particular kata movement. I feel that this is a good way of really getting the students to fully understand the kata. Now, when they move through their kata, they see that strike for what it really is. It gives them a more realistic look at what they are doing. You are practicing your infighting skills every time you perform kata. I feel it helps when you really know what that movement really is doing. Of course, Sanchin is the kata where all is found. So---Analyze the kata for all those great close quarter strikes. There in there.-------Happy Trails -----Art
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Re: ANALYZE KATA--Kata and Fighting

Postby Art Rabesa » Mon Apr 04, 2016 4:10 pm

Age old question here. How does kata help in fighting? Can you benefit from kata? I've discussed this topic with lots of fighters over all these years. Some will defend kata training and others have no use for it. To see the fighting benefits of kata training is only there if you look for it. Some fighters will shadow box as part of their fighting prep. Look at the kata that way. Look at all the movements contained in kata. The moving from one stance to another, with blocks and strikes, could be looked at like shadow boxing. Performing your kata with the vision of the attacker, is really beneficial when you're looking to improve your fighting. Those that do use kata to benefit their fighting training, are gaining extra assistance. I've stated in the past, that you actually do not need kata to be a good fighter. Boxers and most of the MMA fighters, do not even know what a kata is. They're still good fighters. Back and forth here I guess. Once again---my opinion. I believe when good kata training is added to your fighting regime, you'll improve. It will help your overall timing. Good topic for discussion. ------Happy Trails --Art
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Re: ANALYZE KATA

Postby Art Rabesa » Tue Apr 05, 2016 4:17 pm

I've been putting more thought into the post above. Yesterday, after I posted it, I went down in my small training area to analyze it. I wanted to find some movements in kata that I've used fighting. I realized that the "one piece" movement I keep talking about is all through kata. This is the exploding first gear into the strike. Needed when you find yourself at your distance space. That's the distance you're able to cover fast and make good impact. Needed when your opponent has attacked and at his weakest defensively. In kata, this plays throughout. You're always moving from one position to another with blocks and strikes. Getting each block, or strike, to hit in harmony with the stance. Stance and strike happen at the same time. "ONE PIECE". From the kick right into the next block, or strike, in a quick solid movement. Needed when you block that incoming kick with your seisan leg, and counter right off it. The fast shuffling movement of the feet throughout the kata. In moving from stance to stance you shuffle - not step. I picked up this shuffle in kata practice. I used it while fighting to close gaps quickly. I have this shuffle on one of my teaching lessons videos. This will allow you to slide through the kata quickly without appearing to be going fast. You don't want your kata to look hurried. The shuffle will get you through the kata smoother and quicker, without looking hurried. If I worked the kata longer I probably would find more fighting aid. These few fighting elements found in the kata are just the obvious ones. I've known these areas of the kata for kumite assistance for many decades. I thought I'd throw a few on a post in hopes that it will help. There are good fighters that never use kata to help them. I used it to help my fighting. It was a big part of my fighting training. I have said many times - "Perform Kata Like Fighting". I guess it could be stated - "Fight Like You Do Kata". Same thing I guess. -----Happy Trails-----Art
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Re: ANALYZE KATA

Postby Art Rabesa » Fri Apr 15, 2016 4:34 am

http://rabesauechiryu.com/kata-2/

Look for moving in one piece. Everything ending at the same time. Power base.
HAPPY TRAILS --- Art
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Re: ANALYZE KATA

Postby Art Rabesa » Sun Jun 19, 2016 8:59 pm

When looking closely at all the Uechi Ryu kata's, you'll spot the same movements. Placed at different intervals of course, but the same ones. The things you are doing in the first kata , can be found in the last kata taught. Now here's a little teaching tip concerning kata. In class, mix in different drills containing these signature moves. Practice entire kata's for sure, but practice what's there. The step and block -- the turn and block-- sanchin stance into deep stance, or cat stance-- moving from one deep stance to another -- turn block kick -- completing stance with block in one piece-- keeping body level when moving from stance to stance. All these things, and much more, are found in all kata. Going into the deep stance(horse stance) with wauke and elbow strike you do in your first kata, is the same movement you do in your last advanced kata. Movements are the same. To practice these signature Uechi Ryu moves, would be a good thing to do. Movements found in advanced kata can be taught to kyu ranks. It is simply movements taken from the kata. They are not being taught the kata, just movements. When they learn their next kata, the movements in that new kata are not foreign. It becomes a matter of putting the movements in order. I believe it gives students a better understanding of each kata. This is simply a teaching method. A method I've had a lot of success with. When a student is faced with learning a new kata it's not a difficult task. Try this method teachers ---I think you'll find success with it.-------Happy Trails----Art.
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Re: ANALYZE KATA

Postby Art Rabesa » Wed Jun 29, 2016 1:37 am

Another method I use in teaching kata is involving mirror training. I find the more advanced students gaining a better grasp of particular movements, when using the mirror. I like to have them set up in the stance prior to what they're working on, and then go into the next movement. I want them to see their hand position, and if the block and stance are in one piece. I want the head and hands set, prior to the step. I want them to actually see this set up when moving. Moving from different stances is also important mirror training. The overall body mechanics of kata can be fine tuned this way. I really like them to watch their self in sanchin. Set them back, and have them step and thrust moving toward the mirror. Point out what they should detect as they move. Nothing is better for understanding then having students see their self. Tell them what you are looking for, and have them go there. Let them know when they hit it correctly. Remember teachers----nothing succeeds like success. When students understand what they are doing, and how it should look, advancement comes quickly. ----Happy Trails ----Art
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Re: ANALYZE KATA

Postby Art Rabesa » Sun Jul 31, 2016 1:00 pm

When teaching, we use "mirror image". This means that we do movements with our other side. If a right block and counter is what the class is working on, the teacher will perform it left block and counter. When facing the class, the movement is on the same side as the students. This is common when teaching. After teaching for a period of time, teachers can actually do the entire kata backwards. Teachers will give a command - "Right Sanchin -block on front foot punch on back foot". The instructor will put her/his left foot forward - blocking left and punching right. This makes it easier for the class to see, and understand, the movement. Depending on the size of the mirror in the dojo, this is a method of teaching. Sometimes you might only have room for a couple of students to do this. Face the mirror(or mirrors) with the students. Do the movement you are working on with them.Everyone is moving together. They can see themselves with the teacher as the movement is performed. This is done numerous times. Have others step in when there is space for only a few at a time. When the dojo is small, you have to make do. Movement after movement can be taught this way. All the movements of the kata you're working on, can be done this way. Can you teach without this method? Of course. I have taught where there were no mirrors in the training area. I can do that, however it takes away a great teaching aid. Progress is quicker when the students detect their own flaws, and success. They see this in the mirror when doing it alongside the teacher. Beginner or advanced, the same method is used. To "Analyze Kata" , this is a real good way to do it. ------Happy Trails------Art
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Re: ANALYZE KATA

Postby Art Rabesa » Tue Oct 25, 2016 1:37 pm

How fast should you perform kata? If you can perform full movements while moving fast ---go for it. However, this is very difficult to do. What we all have to do is practice body control and mechanics. To move through the kata smoothly with "One Piece" mechanics will get it done. I believe in moving QUICK rather than fast. Is there a difference? Big difference. I call it first gear. I practiced this constantly during my tournament years. To move that three or four foot gap in a snap (explode). Like a race car popping the clutch in first gear. If you've never driven a standard transmission, you might not know what I mean. In the kata, you're doing this from movement to movement. Completing all blocks as the foot hits in the stance. "One Piece". You are not performing the kata fast. You are doing it quickly because you're movements are in one piece. When fighting, I wanted to snap into the strike (Explode). Not moving fast but quick. See the difference?? First gear is all there is. All other gears are not needed. That sprinter who explodes from the starting blocks and has a lead at ten feet. Football coaches love that running back that can be at full speed after the first step. In kata that first step is accomplished when you move everything at the same time, and end at the same time. You want to perform kata swiftly while appearing to move relaxed. To finish your kata 3 or 4 movements ahead of all others. Yet----when you watch your kata, it appears to be done easily. This is the objective here. To move in one piece will involve practice. What does not? -----Happy Trails----Art
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Re: ANALYZE KATA

Postby Art Rabesa » Fri Nov 25, 2016 3:24 pm

Let's have a look at kata in general. It plays a very major role in our traditional training. This fact will be agreed on by the majority of us. Those that do not agree with this can discard this post. Teaching and performing kata is accomplished in the traditional manner. Making each movement clean and clear. Moving into each stance smoothly and performing the block, or blocks, strong. The strike, or strikes, that follow will be clean and crisp. On and on throughout the kata. This is the traditional way the kata is performed and taught. You want the kata to look good. When viewed, it should be clean and clear. OKAY ----that's the traditional way kata is done. We all know this and teach it this way. That will never change. I teach kata this way, and hopefully perform it this way as well. So where does the "ANALYZE" part come in? It comes in at every movement. You're not trying to create something that isn't there. Those that do that make me crazy. At each stop there occurs an action. If this action is looked at closely, you'll find what's really taking place. I will not go through each kata movement to make my point here. I'll pull certain movements out of the kata and work them. Pay particular attention to stances containing multiple blocks and strikes. Here we have what could occur. Meaning that we could use this block and counter --or this block and counter---etc. There is no block following each strike in the real world. In kata there is. Because this might happen in this set up, and you should be able to do it this way. While training at Uechi Sensei's dojo many years ago, I was told that a movement can be done"this way or it can be done this way". In the kata, this is brought out at almost every movement.We slide into the deep stance(horse) and do a wauke(circular) block, followed by an elbow strike - followed by a back punch - and finishing with a one knuckle punch (shoken). You can do this strike--or this strike--or this strike. We step into a sanchin stance and do a wauke - followed by a hammer strike - followed with another wauke- followed by a palm heel - followed by another wauke- and finishing with a finger thrust. Here we see a block following each strike. Once again----we can do this -or this-or this. It is teaching various movements at each station of the kata. This is also brought out when moving from stance to stance. There is more than one way to travel into that next stance. What is done with the placement of the foot, or the path the leg takes, can be different. I have students that do this differently than me. It feels easier, or comfortable, doing their way. I have no problem with this as long as the movement is clean and stable. To analyze the kata is to bring more understanding. A fuller awareness of the movement. This, I believe, makes for a fuller practitioner of the style. So you're not simply waving your arms around when doing the kata. You really know what each movement contains, and your kata shows it. KATA -----REALLY IMPORTANT. ---------Happy Trails ------Art
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