CLOSING THE GAP

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CLOSING THE GAP

Postby Art Rabesa » Mon Jun 22, 2015 11:56 pm

Here are two techniques for closing the distance. There are more methods that I use to get in, but these are two of my favorites. I'll slow it down to clarify the movement before firing it. If you're going to practice it, I suggest doing it slowly to coordinate the hands and feet. Once your comfortable with it you can open up. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7HA15Ukrlk These two techniques really take off, so be careful with your partner.---Happy Trails----Art
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Re: CLOSING THE GAP

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 23, 2015 6:34 pm

This is a prime example of what I mean when I teach angling footwork.

Facing a powerful, quick opponent who can close in on you in a split second, the worst mistake you can make is to 'hold your sanchin stance' and try to block and counter from the 'face off' position.

You might have a chance at 'short stopping' what you can sense is coming by moving in before he gets going and hit him first_ IF_ you really believe you have 'stopping power' in any of your techniques, or you'll end up in the clutches of a bear.

If you back up to your 6 or even to your 4 or 8 positions_ you have had it_ because his action will beat your 'blocking' reaction, if you could even block that 'bicycle attack' _and because with his momentum, he will keep on tracking your moves to your 6/4/8 angles_ as he only will have a slight angle adjustment to make.

Your only chance is to move as he begins to move...and 'drop step' off to your 2 o'clock_ 10 o'clock_ or to your nine o'clock_ or three o'clock angles_ while using a protective and very fast 'sanchin' hands slap and shear moves.

This will get you out of his direct line of entry force and momentum.

As you complete the step off you then need to pivot/tenshin finding yourself to his rear or side, where it will be safer and more propitious to counterstrike...or in many situations...to keep right on going.

I know that many Uechi people have great difficulty understanding this footwork concept as I have experienced in teaching classes.

I wish these people would have been able to be in our dojo when my good friend Wes Tasker honored us with a visit and taught a class on the footwork of Filipino Kuntao Silat martial art.

This is Wes Tasker
Wes has a very extensive and impressive background in martial arts. He has studied American Kempo, Kosho Shorei-ryu Kempo, and various styles of traditional Okinawan and Japanese Karate. Wes also holds a teaching license in a traditional Japanese Bugei system. He is an instructor in various styles of Filipino martial arts and six different Pentjak Silat styles. Wes is an instructor in Quan Chu Xing Yi Kuntao, Bai Yun Ba Gua and Qi Lin Pai Quan Fa. As a representative of New York Internal Arts, Wes is an instructor in Shanxi Xing Yi Quan of Li Gui Chang and Liang Zheng Pu Ba Gua Zhang. He has also studied Western Boxing and Catch Wrestling.


He has an incredible martial arts studies background, as you can see.

I did mention that not only he hits with the power of a cannon ball, but is so fast that he can get behind you in the blink of an eye using the Filipino 'triangle footwork' as just one footwork method.

Your real skill in karate is learning to visualize oncoming attacks along with a subliminal assessment of what you are up against and act accordingly.

COMBINING different types of footwork is essential to survival.

This is from a web discussion on Filipino arts
To improve counterstriking, I focus heavily on stepping at 45 degrees and striking then immediately go on the offensive with Retirada. I practice this to cover both sides so I can counterattack the weaker side when playing righty vs. righty. Obviously it works well vice versa. We refer to the triangular footwork as Tatlong Bao (3 Coconuts).
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Re: CLOSING THE GAP

Postby Art Rabesa » Tue Jun 23, 2015 8:57 pm

I agree with you Van when you talk about angles. I also like to slip into slight angles when countering a bull rush attack. To stop me, or counter my closing distance rush, it has to be read lighting fast. Attacking the attack is the best way to deal with this. My hope is that I can get in before he pulls the trigger. Can't start the closure from a stationary position. That's too easy to detect. Have to shuffle and fire off an angle. Don't want to come straight in. Takes some practice to get the closing angle down. The first sliding move in must really be coordinated, or you'll get countered by a good read. Most of the time, taking the angle and the counter are at the same time. This takes as much practice as closing the distance. That's why fighting is an art. It's not easy. Speed is the all important element . Without it, your simply a target. Being the fighter you are Van, all this is easy to grasp. For the average fighter, this is kind of foggy.
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Re: CLOSING THE GAP

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jun 24, 2015 1:15 pm

Worth reposting this Art.
I also like to slip into slight angles when countering a bull rush attack. To stop me, or counter my closing distance rush, it has to be read lighting fast. Attacking the attack is the best way to deal with this. My hope is that I can get in before he pulls the trigger. Can't start the closure from a stationary position. That's too easy to detect. Have to shuffle and fire off an angle. Don't want to come straight in. Takes some practice to get the closing angle down. The first sliding move in must really be coordinated, or you'll get countered by a good read. Most of the time, taking the angle and the counter are at the same time. This takes as much practice as closing the distance.


And also my constant reminder that if decide to 'close in' we better have a guarantee of 'stopping power' in whatever we bring to an opponent.

And also mindful that no matter how strong and effective we think we are, there are people out there who can take all we can dish out without flinching much.

It is here we need to be able to sense the kind of enemy we are up against.
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Re: CLOSING THE GAP

Postby Art Rabesa » Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:25 pm

No doubt. I agree 100% with that assessment. There are tough people out there, that's a given. The only thing a person can do is to train to give ones self a better chance of survival. That is why we emphasize stopping power so much in our teaching. Striking doesn't mean much if you do not put him down. There will always be tough, strong people out there. One hopes that they never run into any of them. If you do, you better be able to hit strong enough to get yourself out of there. That's really all you can do with the training. Make sure you are able to move quickly and hit hard. I have always known that. That is why Van, we teach power Uechi-Ryu. Those that disagree with that style of teaching better buy them selves a shot gun. -----Art
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Re: CLOSING THE GAP-LEG THRUSTS

Postby Art Rabesa » Thu Jul 09, 2015 7:09 pm

Here is a look at getting in using the low fast leg thrusts. Can not really let these go when with a partner. You have to unload these on a heavy bag when practicing full speed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Y-tqN5 ... QSdCUh3_gA
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Re: CLOSING THE GAP- grab & bang

Postby Art Rabesa » Wed Aug 05, 2015 1:18 am

I like to grab and keep him real close once I close the distance. This allows for some strong strikes to various parts of the body and head. Take a look.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJTr9Epoue0
Happy Trails-------Art
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Re: CLOSING THE GAP-GRAB &BANG CONT.

Postby Art Rabesa » Thu Aug 06, 2015 2:56 pm

A quick lesson on some more "grab and bang. Really tight forearm and elbow strikes. Maintaining the grasp to help power these strikes. Coordinating the grab with the strike to really explode these strikes. -------Happy Trails------Art
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dYt26jawy8
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Re: CLOSING THE GAP-& rapid fire

Postby Art Rabesa » Mon Aug 24, 2015 2:20 pm

Closing that gap is not exceptionally difficult to learn. You'll be able to fire in there and get close after some amount of practice. What will take a good amount of time, will be your ability to coordinate strikes closing that distance. That is why I teach the whole package. Closure with strikes---Not closure and then strike. See the difference? Your ability to fire strikes as you are closing is essential. Sometimes, the first strike doesn't actually make any contact. It does clear the path for what's following. These strikes are not all hands. Short fast leg thrusts can slip in between those hand strikes. Obviously, this can not be practiced on the heavy bag. The kicking bags can be used with your partner. The one holding the bag has to be able to anticipate what is being practiced as well. Both of you have to work together to coordinate your movements. Once you are able to fire strikes as you are moving, work without the holding bag. Work numerous angles to fire in from. Work punches in as you are closing. Remember, it all must explode at the same time. There can not be any delay between you moving and the strikes. This is what will take time to develop. Only lots of reps with your training partner will get you there. Remember, you can close the gap with a leg thrust followed by your hands. One of my favorites is coming off the stomp thrust with an open hand to the head. This stomp thrust really clears a path for you once you've perfected it. Always working on your hand position as you are moving. To keep your hands at 10 and 2 as you are closing the distance ,will allow you to work more effectively. Everything rolls off this hand position. All your hand strikes fire rapidly from this steering wheel position. Checking my "closing the gap" video will help, but it won't solve everything. You have to develop your own method for closing the gap. If you want to be a good fighter, you will have to be able to close the distance fast, and be able to go to work once you are close. I've been asked a few times about the most important thing in being a good fighter. My answer is always the same ----IT IS BETTER TO HIT THAN BE HIT ------Think about it. -------Happy Trails ---Art
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