Kingai Sanchin

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Kingai Sanchin

Postby Van Canna » Tue Oct 12, 2004 5:15 pm

Seth Rosenblatt, one of my strongest, ever, TC students, is presently in Japan working under contract teaching English. He is a graduate of Brandeis University. He has been in Japan for about three years, I believe.

He will be visiting Boston for two weeks, from oct. 28 through early on nov. 4.

He has been training with Sensei Uehara in Tokyo all that time.

When he comes back to Brandeis, he will be introducing some great Uechi concepts he learned in Japan.

van! great to hear from you!

as far as training goes, they spend they most time on kumite on sanchin,
conditioning and kumite. although they also do kata and free sparring as
well, there's far less emphasis on them. perhaps home practice for kata is
expected? i don't know, it hasn't been communicated to me verbally.

there is a strict emphasis placed on landing a step first, then blocking,
then punching. none of the moves are practiced simultaneously, even at the
black belt level. they are timed extremely close together, but there's
still that separation.

one of my favorite aspects of the uehara dojo are that all kumite
sequences end in take-downs. it's not "jiu-jitsu being brought into
uechi," it's simply part of the curriculum, so that even white belts are
doing rolls and throws.

another is the kingai sanchin, which is a sanchin done with extreme
resistance from a partner. the strikes are done with closed fists as your
partner leverages his body weight against your movements. it's like doing
sanchin through half-set concrete, tough and invigorating.


i'll see what i can do about making a video of one of our routine
practices.

take care, and i'll see you soon! can't wait...

/.s./


It sounds great. Can't wait either, Seth, and looking forward to learning all this from you.

Have a safe trip.
Van
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Postby Van Canna » Tue Oct 12, 2004 5:29 pm

there is a strict emphasis placed on landing a step first, then blocking,
then punching. none of the moves are practiced simultaneously, even at the
black belt level. they are timed extremely close together, but there's
still that separation.


I find this fascinating because it is the method used by Kanbun Uechi, according to the information relayed by Toyama sensei.
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Postby SAN-DAI-RYU » Tue Oct 12, 2004 5:54 pm

sensei

it sounds very interesting! 8O

Carlos Sensei
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Postby Spike » Wed Oct 13, 2004 2:48 pm

8) I'm all ears
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More notes on the Uehara dojo sanchin

Postby Seth Rosenblatt » Fri Oct 15, 2004 4:15 am

Two years in Japan, but it feels like three. :)

I've been training with Uehara-sensei for a year and half. In that time, the development of the kingai sanchin has been one of the physically toughest parts of the workout. But we also use the Okinawan jars, gripping on to them while going through a full sanchin (without the <i>kaze kuruma</i>, the circle blocks at the end. Kaze kuruma means "circle wind".)

In Uehara's dojo, the movements within sanchin are broken down even more as a training tool than I remember in America. The first sanchin is done at a normal speed, perhaps with an emphasis on form, but with a body check throughout the kata.

The second sanchin uses the Okinawan jars, which help emphasize a low center of gravity and pulling the musculature down, which is tricky without contorting the body.

The third is the aforementioned kingai. Resistance is not only given by the instructor or partner pushing back on your limbs, but also by the person doing the kata as the arms are pulled back. The stepping and arm strikes are done this way, and then the kaze kuruma are done with explosive power, faster than in the first sanchin and with target areas on the center line of the opponents body, the face and groin.

There are other minor differences to the Uehara dojo sanchin. There are eye strikes following each of the double strikes. When we step off in the first sanchin, the steps are always forward, never backward. Kingai kaze kuruma is done from a cat stance. Also, when doing the kaze kuruma, we use the old style training technique of crossing the face-striking hand into the elbow crease of the groin-striking hand before doing the circle block and strike.

/.s./
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Postby Van Canna » Fri Oct 15, 2004 4:29 am

Hi Seth,

Great stuff, and thanks for posting. I was practicing some of what you describe, last night at Brandeis, with Cristian Kime, who visited you in Japan and worked out at Uehara's dojo with you.

He did show me a pronounced "back lean" in sanchin. It appears to be close to what Toyama sensei teaches. Is that related to the old style?

Best,
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Postby Van Canna » Fri Oct 15, 2004 4:42 am

explosive power, faster than in the first sanchin and with target areas on the center line of the opponents body, the face and groin.


This is interesting. 8O

And we will need some jars at Brandeis.
:wink:
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Postby Seth Rosenblatt » Fri Oct 15, 2004 10:08 am

heh. the "jars" we use are fairly easy to make - just wooden handles inserted into cylindrical concrete blocks, maybe 10" across by 24" tall, maybe 10kg each. i can find out exact measurements if anyone's interested.

we also have a makiwara set up like a sawhorse, so we hit down onto it. still makes for excellent conditioning of the knuckles and side of the hands, but it's easily portable.

after watching everybody - and i do try to watch as many people as i can, the new white belts up through the senior students with 40 plus years behind them, since the language barrier prevents a lot of verbal communication - it sure seems like the emphasis on the back is much further back than at the TC dojo, but because the shoulders are rolled forward and pulled down, it's not quite as extreme as it sounds.

as far as things being "old style" or not, my muscle memory is still fairly confused about which moves are american and which are japanese. i probably look very frankensteinesque when doing kata...
/.s./
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Postby SAN-DAI-RYU » Fri Oct 15, 2004 11:30 am

Seth
great happiness to listen of you

Sensei

this work is very interesting serious fantastico if to be able here to make a video of Seth doing this work of sanchin, and to fix it here.

I and many of the instructors to be very been thankful.
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Postby Van Canna » Sat Oct 16, 2004 3:35 am

but because the shoulders are rolled forward and pulled down, it's not quite as extreme as it sounds.


Yes, it sounds like the manner in which Toyama sensei teaches as per the old style as taught by Kanbun.

A whole different set of concepts/principles with that posture as I learned from Breyette sensei.

Carlos,

Sure. If Seth can come up with the video about Uehara sensei's training we would post it here.
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Postby Seth Rosenblatt » Sun Oct 17, 2004 10:14 am

i've procurred a video camera, videographer and post-production editor. we'll aim no lower than the oscars on this! :wink:

tomorrow night i'm going to ask sensei for permission to shoot. i'll keep y'all informed. i'm excited to see this interest in what's going on here in toks.

be good...
/.s./
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Postby benzocaine » Sun Oct 17, 2004 11:42 am

Kingai kaze kuruma is done from a cat stance.


I have a question about his.

When you land the strike does the cat stance convert to a sanchin stance for extra power, or does it remain a niko dachi?

Please post the video.Being in Japan you must have access to some kick azzz camera's. My piddley little 120.00 digital still camera can make a five minute MPEG or AVI clip.



Thanks So Much for sharing!! 8)
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Postby Seth Rosenblatt » Sun Oct 17, 2004 4:10 pm

the kingai kaze kuruma nekodachi (cat stance) transitions by sliding forward into a standard sanchin stance, timed with the forward strike of the arms.
/.s./
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Postby Spike » Mon Oct 18, 2004 5:25 pm

"i've procurred a video camera, videographer and post-production editor. we'll aim no lower than the oscars on this! "

Great Stuff 8)
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