Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:43 pm

f.Channell »

Joe,
Depending on the clothing either a collar choke or maybe a cupped hand behind the neck or hair, and a shoken or hiraken drilling in to the front of the throat.

The bridging being done towards the outside of the shoulders with a powerful hand movement of some type to assist and toss the bad guy off.

The bridge during the choke might help as well.

I know we started from the top mount, my instructor just always says "the best way to get out of a hold, is not to get in the hold". :) So I can't help thinking it.
And from your fight films Joe, I haven't seen you top mounted either. 8)
Fred
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:46 pm

RACastanet »

How did I get the elbow to break? The arm wrap is just above the elbow.

As the attacker is rolled off (as a clarification, if my right arm has wrapped the left arm, I would want to use my free left hand to apply a blow, push or some other pleasent softening technique to the attackers right shoulder, face, whatever to assist the bucking motion in the desired direction)

and I get up onto a knee or standing position, I'd let my right arm slide over the elbow towards the wrist. My left hand is now at the wrist positioning the attackers palm and elbow to face away from me (if it does not already).

From the kneeling position I can pull the wrist towards my body while thusting my hips into the elbow. If standing, I'd slip my foot under the shoulder and use my shin/knee/thigh to generate the hyperextension of the elbow as I pulled up and back on the wrist. In either case, my right arm is securely wrapped on the elbow or slightly towards the wrist. The tap outs come really quick in practice.

This sounds complicated but it happens very fast. If the attacker senses what is happening and yields there might be time to stop before the joint is damaged. If the attacker is thrashing, or grabbing for something important to distract you, let 'er rip!

Yes Joe, I'm well into the green belt and brown belt syllabus for MCMAP which includes the above grappling techniques. We have taken a month off from individual training because of bad weather and the need to train a slew of new Lts and instructors getting ready to head out into the fleet.

Hopefully I'll resume my weekly trips to Quantico next week. I'd love to get the green belt certification before July. Could get to brown belt by the end of the year but that is very optimistic.

By the way, my current emoticon is the official MACE (Martial arts Center of Excellence) emblem. Boy would I love to get one of their training blouses with the emblem.

Regards, Rich

Member of the world's premier gun club, the USMC!
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:48 pm

Strictly arm thrusting, except for a few selected moves, will make your “beefy” opponent mad, and you will pay dearly for your mistake.

If you cannot launch a stopping strike, then don’t raise your hands in self defense at all, because you will be digging your own grave, not only by pissing the opponent off but by giving him the “right” to stomp out your eyeballs.

Also, you will know that you do not possess “street stopping power” and you will not “launch” out of fear of making things worse for yourself..If you don’t believe anything, believe this.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:49 pm

There is also the fatigue factor involved here. People who are not used to try and “wiggle” free of a dead weight on their chest, while taking some vicious pummeling to the head sandwiched between the floor and the knuckles, have no idea how quickly they will exhaust physically and mentally.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:52 pm

Joe,
Interesting discussion on bill’s forum about the core Uechi techniques. Bill makes a point worth noting and one in the back of many people’s minds as to
the difference between NHB fighting and real self defense.
Uechi Ryu is a style of specialized striking techniques. If you aren't practicing to use your shoken, your hiraken, your boshiken, your sokusen, and your nukite, you aren't really practicing the lethal style Kanbun practiced and taught. You are merely doing a watered down imitation suitable for sport competition and gentlemanly fighting.

Check out what techniques they ban in "no holds barred" (sic) fighting. Then look at your Uechi style.


What is your opinion on this? Let’s say that tomorrow NHB allowed a top Uechi senior trained well in the techniques that bill mentions, to do “his thing” against the fighters of the caliber you fight.

Would they really have a chance of making those lethal techniques work?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:57 pm

Rick Wilson »

“When you are mounted and being punched in the face, what do you do?” – Attack so that you can dismount them.

First of all let me say I think that everyone should learn ground grappling. Not necessarily to become good enough to beat a ground grappler but learn enough to know what they can do to you.

Too many strikers get caught doing stupid things because they just don’t know any better.

Since this is part of an article I hope to try and have published I evidently can only paraphrase.

The issue of generating power while on the bottom of the mount:

Clearly the use of the knees and hips and inertia are removed while you are in this position. This is why we often see only arm strikes as previously mentioned.

However, there is body compression.

When in a protective position (hands must be raised and bring your forearms close together to protect your face) use your chest, back and shoulder muscles to pull the strike straight down from their protective position into your opponent's torso. (The action is very much like doing a sit up.)

Use a hammer fist, shuto (knife hand), crane beak or shoken (one knuckle strike but delivered like knocking on a door) and extend the arm down driving into your opponent's torso (or limbs).

This body compression method must be used to generate power or you will only be striking with arm power and it will be ineffective.

If you doubt the power of these strikes have a partner take the mount position with a striking pad placed against their stomach and chest. Try them out. Done properly the effectiveness should be clearly evident.

When they are riding higher or pinning you to the ground with their body is another part of the article, sorry.
Rick Wilson
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 12, 2018 3:01 pm

JDeLuca »

Joe P and to Those discussing being MOUNTED

Being mounted is certainly one of the worst positions to be in. While helping KF train for his last fight it was the positioned I dreaded the most.

What I attempt to do first is to keep the person on top close. If I can trap an arm, trap the same side leg, I have an opportunity to bridge and roll then fight out of the guard.

With a higher mount established (his knees in your armpits) things get a lot tougher.

First you must make enough space to regain a favorable elbow (yeah sanchin) position.

If the mounter is still upright in punching position look to trap his hands buck forward and roll.

More often than not against a seasoned grappler neither will work. I will then look for the opportunity to quickly bridge to occupy his hands as he bases, push low on the hips, and replace my legs to half, full or butterfly guard.

Things I don't look to do

*Punch while being mounted: don't want to go there, better to keep him wrestling.
*Reach under or between the legs while mounted: Triangle Choke City.
*Escalate the confrontation while being mounted: They are in the better position to give it back to you.

Jim Deluca
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:38 pm

Triangle choke...well worth the practice.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mDKZOaTzBM
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:12 pm

In addition to astronomical legal defense costs...you also need to understand that the court may order that you make restitution for damages you caused to someone while 'defending yourself' if you are found guilty or accept a plea bargain.

https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndga/victi ... estitution
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:30 pm

Any amount ordered paid as restitution shall be reduced by any amount later recovered as compensatory damages for the same loss in any related civil proceeding.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:34 pm

Keep in mind that 'restitution' in a criminal proceeding is not something covered under any of your insurance policies or legal services.

It becomes crucial having good criminal defense attorneys that know what they are doing and available at a moment's notice...or you are sunk.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:16 pm

Safe and Effective Counsel in Criminal Plea Bargains

Something you want to be familiar with if you are thinking about using your karate etc. in some altercation.


http://www.lawyersmutualnc.com/risk-man ... a-bargains

In Lafler v. Cooper and Missouri v. Frye, the Supreme Court for the first time said there is a Sixth Amendment right to effective counsel in plea negotiations. This means that if defendants get lousy legal advice regarding a plea deal, they might be entitled to a “do-over” if their case turns out badly.

Which places more pressure on trial lawyers.

It was conceded in both cases that the defense lawyers did poor jobs. In Cooper, a defendant turned down a plea offer based on erroneous advice from his lawyer. He went on to be tried, convicted and sentenced to prison. In Frye, the lawyer failed to communicate a plea offer to his client, who then accepted a less favorable plea.


And keep in mind that despite what you may think 'not to think' of any of this when you are 'defending' yourself and using empty hands or weapon...you really must think of it...

Because if you 'survive' 'wrong'...you will be contemplating your 'victory' financially destitute and in solitude behind bars for the rest of your years.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:22 pm

And keep remembering that any plea you go for will greatly impact the duty to defend and indemnify contained in the insurance contractual language of your insurance policy in a civil action against you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 14, 2018 12:54 am

This court has held that a self-defense instruction is not available when the parties are engaging in mutual combat. Mutual combat occurs when both parties enter into the combat willingly or voluntarily; it implies a common intent to fight. It does not matter which party initiated the confrontation when both parties willingly engaged in it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 14, 2018 12:59 am

K.S.A. 2017 Supp. 21-5202(h) defines intent:

“A person acts ‘intentionally,’ or ‘with intent,’ with respect to the nature of such person’s conduct or to a result of such person’s conduct when it is such person’s conscious objective or desire to engage in the conduct or cause the result.”
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