Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:25 pm

Then one researcher, Gary A. Klein, decided to study how "expert" field commanders actually made decisions. He observed firefighters at a variety of emergency scenes. Guess what? They did not use anything like the MDMP. Klein discovered experienced commanders used an intuitive process he called the Recognition Planning Model.

Instead of amassing a list of all possible courses of action, these decision-makers assessed the situation and picked one plausible course of action, based on their assessment. They mentally played out the probable outcome of that course of action, and if it seemed likely to work, they tried it, and then adjusted as needed.

Klein looked further into how these "experts" assessed situations and discovered two size-up strategies. If the decision-makers had encountered something similar in the past, they used a process called "feature-matching." In other words, they compared the known situation with the current, unknown one.

If there were enough similarities, they responded with tactics that had worked in the past. If, on the other hand, the situation was novel and unlike anything they had previously encountered, they tried to imagine a course of events that would result in the situation--a strategy Klein called "story-building."

In other words, they made up a story to match the facts and then chose a course of action that made sense with that story (somehow, it always comes back to stories).
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 15, 2019 4:26 pm

Expert decision-making depends on becoming good at two skills:

* Making accurate size-ups
* Choosing effective initial courses of action

Scenario-based training builds both these skills, because (like real life) they provide immediate feedback to the officer. If you assume the call for a man down in the park is a passed-out drunk, but it turns out to be a heart attack victim, you learn to assess the situation more carefully.

If you try bullying an obnoxious complainant and it just makes things worse, well, next time you'll try a different tack. Scenario-based training builds these skills, but--unlike real life--it also provides a safe learning environment.

You can try things out, and if they don't work, there's no harm. As the saying goes, "Good decisions come from experience...and experience comes from bad decisions."

Even better, because scenario-based training so fully engages learners, the lessons learned will also be retained. Officers get a head start on gaining the experience they need to be effective and safe on the street. And of course, they'll also come away from the training with a good story to tell.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:33 pm

Serious stuff most people gloss over...

Post Traumatic-Shock Disorder is the number one killer of combatants.

The universal human phobia is interpersonal aggression.

Immediately after the event, you may feel revulsion, not at the act, but at the repugnant sights, sounds and odors it produces.

You may become nauseous, throw up or even faint.

You may feel remorse, not regarding the moral justification of the event, but simply a sadness or sorrow over being forced into it.

You may feel self-doubt and start to second-guess your actions.

This can proceed to the point of denial.

Rational people will eventually conclude that they had no viable choice and finally come to accept what transpired.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:40 pm

How many of us think of this?

An extremely traumatic event occurs when, after you’ve just succeeded in remaining alive despite overwhelming odds and ...

1) Your primal response is one of, “That guy just tried to kill me but I’m still alive! I must have done something right! “ and

2) The “official” response to your life-preserving action is, “Get on the ground, scumbag! You’re under arrest!” and

3) The tool you just used to preserve your very life, and now have a fond regard for, is forcibly removed from you;

you’re, not gently, physically restrained and handcuffed, and then cruelly isolated by being tossed into a filthy cage intended for predatory criminals, with no contact with any compassionate individual who could calm and comfort you,

a form of torture for the specific purpose to psychologically defeat you when you’re at your lowest emotional point, impersonally “grilling” you, thereby fostering further doubt and insidiously “planting” their version of events which your information-starved brain regurgitates and solidifies -

permanently, through confabulation, so real you’ll pass a lie-detector test about it -into the “real” way it happened.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:41 pm


Your immediate body reactions may include: trembling, sweating, chills, hyperventilation, dizziness, jumpiness, hyperactivity, thirstiness, upset stomach, nausea, diarrhea, constant urge to urinate, sleep disturbance and nightmares.

Your long-term reaction may be a preoccupation with the event, reliving it over and over, second-guessing yourself, the feeling that you must have done something wrong, to the point where it metamorphosizes into your shadow, always with you:

to experience irritability, loss of ability to function, outbreaks of rage, loss of ability to eat and sleep, tremors, sweats, nightmares, clinical depression, possibly even to the point of suicide, sexual dysfunction including

impotence, flashbacks, inability to control your emotions, or other symptoms, such as survivor guilt, the “mark of Cain syndrome” (everyone knows what I’ve done), social withdrawal, ostracization, the feeling that “nobody else understands,” disorientation, confusion, inability to concentrate and exaggerated startle response;


but if you’ve trained properly and mentally prepared yourself in advance with a dedicated, close-knit team of reassuring friends and relatives who understand and agree with your point of view, then your psychic cost can be lowered.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:43 pm

Teach them this comforting phrase from Chris Pollack: “I’m so glad you’re O. K.!”

They haven’t been here before either. They suffer from social paralysis.

They’re embarrassed and don’t know what to say, and so are afraid to say anything for fear of saying the wrong thing.

Realize that it’s not your reaction to having had to justifiably kill; it’s your reaction to having survived -it’s society’s reaction to your having justifiably killed.

You’ll live with the image of that terrible moment burned into your soul, but no one can bear the burden but you.

But you’re not going to get a union- or municipally-paid counselor to help you through this -you’re on your own.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:45 pm


Why isn’t there a national victim advocate system to pay the medical and legal bills of honest unorganized Militia members illegally assaulted by predatory criminals?

Why is there no “eight-hundred” number you can dial at any hour to receive the required counseling for the psychological burden this lowlife scumbag has illegally dumped on you?

Still, I believe the most outstanding immediate thought will be the combination of joy that you’re still alive and justifiable anger that this slimeball’s forced this on you.

You may be surprised or repulsed by this reaction, but you can’t control it -at the time, your upper brain function was hijacked by your mid brain -which is overjoyed you lived. It’s called survival euphoria, and you’re not the first to experience it.


Lieutenant-Colonel Dave Grossman counsels, “you’re only as sick as your secrets: pain shared is pain divided; joy shared is joy multiplied.”
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:48 pm


How do you know it’s Post Shooting Disorder?

If it causes impairment or distress in any significant facet of your life and it lasts at least a month, you have it.

For you, there’ll be no powerful ceremony, no positively-reinforcing societal ritual conferring a physical talisman bestowing confirmation to you, your beloved family, cherished friends, respected neighbors and the public that you weren’t the bad guy,

that you did something good and deserving of approval, praise and adulation to their enthusiastic cheers and accompanying strains of “Fanfare for the Common Man” by Aaron Copeland.

At this time you’ll instead be reeling from the full weight of the certain knowledge that Der State holds predatory criminals in higher regard than you, since you’re now impoverished and imprisoned, and the creepy bad guy -

Mister Bad Guy to you -is being represented for free by the best lawyers that the Banana-head Brady Campaign can purchase with money supplied by every Hollywood druggie/actor-singer alive and every social fascist talk show host/reporter out there -and I do mean out there.


In spite of the fact that you’re being held almost incommunicado and that nearly every word that reaches your ears is a calculated lie, you still feel guilt over winning the fight, because you’re alive and he isn’t, while simultaneously feeling elation at the exact same thought.

Seems a little insane, doesn’t it?

See the article in the July/August 2003 issue of “The ‘Police’ Marksman magazine entitled “Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.”

Due to stress, there’ll be holes in your recollection, and you’ll swear you remember things happened that never did.

This is the mental condition you’ll be in when the District Attorney, a long-time evil social fascist, assaults your story with wild and absurd conjecture that a five-year-old would never believe, but every evil social fascist Rosie - watching juror is drooling over.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:51 pm

He’ll send your own lawyer in to you with a plea bargain to lower the charges to something less… something that will result in less than citizenship -and a criminal record guaranteeing you’ll never carry again!

Believe me, you don’t want to become part of the probation and parole population: arrogant mercenary proxy-guardian “police,” parole, and probation officers now boldly burst into homes without search warrants

as a way of life for those unfortunates subject to parole or probation, harassing and arbitrarily arresting and revoking their parole and probation for the most asinine and unconstitutional excuses.


The etymology of the word “Arrest” comes from the French word for “stop.”

Whenever predatory social fascist agents of the state brace an unorganized Militia member, stop him, and demand to see “your papers, please!” he’s been “arrested,” no matter whether he’s been “read his rights,” no matter what niceties the court may apply to the various steps of the process.

The 1980 u. S. v. Mendenhall decision stated that arrest occurs when a reasonable person feels that he’s no longer free to leave the presence questioning him, but I’m sure you’ll have no doubt of your status by that time.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:53 pm

A mercenary proxy-guardian “police” officer can’t seize your person [I.e. He can’t prohibit you from your coming and going] unless you’ve committed a crime-or, unless the officer has 'probable cause' to believe a crime has been, or is being, committed.

The term 'probable cause' refers to a felony [I.E., a serious crime.]

Hence, probable cause doesn’t apply to mere traffic infractions of the law, nor even criminal misdemeanors.

The burden is upon mercenary proxy-guardian “police” to explain being stopped.

Terry v. Ohio, 392 u. S. 1 [1968] was when the united States supreme court explained the circumstances under which a "stop-and-frisk" could be Constitutionally permissible.

The supreme court concluded that where a mercenary proxy-guardian “police” officer observes unusual conduct which leads the officer to reasonably conclude that criminal activity is taking place and that the person involved in that activity may be armed and dangerous the officer is entitled to conduct a limited search of the person's outer clothing specifically to discover weapons.

A “ frisk” for the sake of performing a pat-down is a violation of the united States Constitution.

The same supreme court that defines liberty as freedom of movement recently decided, in Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al., that the “crime” of failing to identify one’s self exists, thus judicially nullifying both the Fourth and Fifth Amendments.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:55 pm


The states of Alabama, Florida, Kansas, New York, Utah, and Wisconsin label a “Terry” stop specifically as “stop and identify.”

I hope your life was, up to this point, uneventful, because after this, you won’t believe the power brought to bear against you, not only by mercenary proxy-guardian “police” and prosecutors,

but by the threat’s lawyers and the investigators he hires to dissect your entire life, stalking you, recording your movements, harassing your (soon to be former) employer and friends, subpoenaing your records: has your permit ever been revoked?

Even judge Robert Bork’s video rentals were subpoenaed during his confirmation hearings: where have you been on the Internet you don’t want the whole world to know about?

Be cautious of your relation with your attorney because: "His first duty is to the courts... not to the client," u. S. v Franks D. C. N. J. 53 F. 2d 128.

"Clients are also called ‘wards of the court’ in regard to their relationship with their attorneys," Spilker v. Hansin, 158 F. 2d 35, 58 u. S. App. D. C. 206.

“Wards of court: Infants and persons of unsound mind,” Davis Committee v. Lonny, 290 Ky. 644, 162 S. W. 2d 189, 190.

Did you get that?

An attorney’s first duty isn’t to you, and when you have an attorney you’re either considered insane or an infant!

How do you select a good attorney?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 11:02 pm

The single attacker is mostly a delusion.

Being attacked by two or more assailants is the norm these days and not the exception.

You are the deer with the ‘sharp pointed antlers and hard hooves’ but you become confused and lash out ineffectively or try to run _ then you are brought down by the pack and eaten.

8 ways to survive:

1. Enter the mind of the assailants

2. Action still beats reaction; at best you will only be one step ahead of your assailants, and therefore, preemptive striking is mandatory.

3. You must instantly heighten your energy level to its maximum because you may have to hit multiple attackers repeatedly.

4. The shout is even more important as a psychological weapon since it can add to the demoralization of the rest of the attackers.

5. Mobility and footwork is crucial. Don’t get into a sanchin stance.

6. You can’t afford to give up thinking they will stop because each assailant will try to outdo the damage caused by the others_ this is something not many give it much thought.

7. The physical fighting techniques are almost the same; what differs is the openings which you must learn to see and create.

8. Positioning is the key, the strategy is a little like that found in a football playbook.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 11:03 pm

* avoid being alone

*Watch your back

*Make a heightened state of awareness your norm

* Maximize peripheral vision

*Utilize reflection

* Learn positioning

* Selection [from anthropology we learn that if you broke the morale of the enemy _ it would try to run and suffer 90% casualties]

Case 1.

In this scenario you are are approached by two men, side by side, both visible, making a threatening move towards you.

How do you position and move?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 20, 2019 11:09 pm

There is a very fine line between waiting for the blow to fall and acting when you see the blow forming.

If you determine you are in a lethal confrontation, you should know how to act- not to react - to solve the problem.

You direct your actions, not let the threat control you.


This is problem solving not problem avoidance. Positive immediate action beats the hell out of everything else.

“You are confronted by an individual who gets within your defensible space and commands you to give him all your money now or he’ll blow your head off or ‘cut you’ _

you can’t avoid this problem_ it is right here and now.”



What are you going to do? And if you do it...will it be half ass effective at least...or will it ****** you into the jaws of death?

Think of how many of us, regardless of a style, really think they can stop anyone with their 'power blows' like a 'huff and a puff, I'll blow your house down' ...

Not realizing that some people you will not stop even with pistol gunfire...so what makes you more effective than a .45 caliber slug?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Jun 26, 2019 9:38 pm

Peer Aggression (not bullying), A Paradigm Shift

Darren Laur »

Peer Aggression, A Paradigm Shift

“Why the Word Bullying Trivializes Aggressive/Criminal Behaviour”


Through my teachings of children, I have been asked by several concerned parents, and even school educators, if I could speak on the issue of “bullying” and the challenges needed to deal with it in a desirable manner. Based upon these enquiries, my research began, and what I found was that in dealing with this important issue, we need to create a paradigm shift on the semantics of this issue, starting with the word “bully”.

To me the word “bully” trivializes aggressive, and at times, criminal behaviour, especially once the “aggressor” turns the age of 12 in Canada. Often what has been called “bullying” behaviour is seen to be nothing more than normal childhood behaviour involving children with competing claims.

To me however, bullying behaviour is a conscious, willful, and deliberate aggressive activity that is intended to harm, be it emotionally, psychologically, or physically, and induce fear through the threats of further aggression, thus creating fear and terror in the identified target.

These types of behaviours in the criminal justice world are known as criminal harassment, utter threats, and assault; but yet in our schools it is treated more like undesirable, and sometimes “trivial” or “insignificant” like behaviour.

Darren
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